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Cognitive, supportive , occupational theraphy, by manish Bijalwan .M.sc nursing.,Psychiatric

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  • WAT S TALK THERAPY?
  • Involves a patient and a psychotherapist sitting in a room talking, but it is much more than that.
  • Psychotherapy can be an effective treatment for depression, because it helps the patient delve into the underlying reasons for his depression and learn new coping skills.
  • All-or-Nothing Thinking: Failing to recognize that there may be some middle ground. Characterized by absolute terms like always, never, and forever.Overgeneralization: Taking an isolated case and assuming that all others are the same.Mental Filter: Mentally singling out the bad events in one's life and overlooking the positive.Disqualifying the Positive: Treating positive events like they don't really count.Jumping to Conclusions: Assuming the worst about a situation even though there is no evidence to back their conclusion.Magnification and Minimization: Downplaying positive events while paying an inordinate amount of attention to negative ones.Emotional Reasoning: Allowing your emotions to govern what you think about a situation rather than objectively looking at the facts.Should Statements: Rigidly focusing on how you think things should be rather than finding strategies for dealing with how things are.Labeling and Mislabeling: Applying false and harsh labels to oneself and others.Personalization: Blaming yourself for things that are out of your control.
  • Psychoanalytically informed therapists provide reassurance, encouragement, active teaching, comforting to the patient in distressPersuasion: modify patients behavior by reasoningRe education: educate pt regarding his problems, way of coping
  • Halfway homes: A place to allow convicted criminals to begin the process of reintegration with society, while still providing monitoring and support; this is generally believed to reduce the risk of recidivism or relapse when compared to a release directly into society. Halfway houses are meant for reintegration of persons who have been recently released from jail or a mental institution. 
  • Cso (1)

    1. 1. TALK THERAPY???? “Psychotherapy”
    2. 2. PSYCHOTHERAPY Patient Psychotherapist
    3. 3. PSYCHOTHERAPY Psychotherapists have training in a variety of techniques which may be employed in order to help patients to • recover from mental illness • resolve personal issues • create desired changes in their lives.
    4. 4. PSYCHOTHERAPY IN DEPRESSION Used for ferreting out the psychological factors that contribute to depression where antidepressant medication corrects the underlying chemical imbalance.
    5. 5. TYPES OF PSYCHOTHERAPY • Cognitive therapy • Behavioral therapy • Cognitive behavioral therapy • Dialectical Behavior Therapy • Psychodynamic therapy • Interpersonal therapy • • • • • • Supportive therapy Hypnosis Abreaction therapy Relaxation therapies Family therapy Group therapy
    6. 6. COGNITIVE THERAPY SUPPORTIVE THERAPY & OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY -Mr. Manish Bijalwan M.Sc Nursing 1st yr SCON
    7. 7. COGNITIVE THERAPY
    8. 8. COGNITIVE THERAPY At the heart of cognitive therapy is the idea that our thoughts can affect our emotions.
    9. 9. COGNITIVE THERAPY PRINCIPLE: • Thoughts precede moods and false selfbeliefs lead to negative emotions
    10. 10. COGNITIVE THERAPY • cognitive distortions common patterns of negative thinking 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. All-or-Nothing Thinking Overgeneralization Mental Filter Disqualifying the Positive Jumping to Conclusions Magnification and Minimization Emotional Reasoning Should Statements Labeling and Mislabeling Personalization
    11. 11. COGNITIVE THERAPY AIM: • To help the patient recognize and reassess his patterns of negative thoughts and replace them with positive thoughts that more closely reflect reality.
    12. 12. COGNITIVE THERAPY • Developed by American psychiatrist ‘Aaron T. Beck’ in 1960. • PROCESS: 1. 2. 3. 4. Development of skills for modifying beliefs Identification of distorted thinking Relate to others in different ways Change in behaviors
    13. 13. COGNITIVE THERAPY Cognition triad: cognition model of depression
    14. 14. COGNITIVE THERAPY INDICATION: • An effective treatment for depression • Combination of cognitive therapy and antidepressants has been shown to be effective in managing severe or chronic depression.
    15. 15. RECENT IN COGNITIVE THERAPY • Cognitive therapies for suicide prevention, and schizophrenia and other psychopathologies. • In addition, ongoing research is being conducted to measure the impact of city mental health agencies’ organization structure on the adoption of cognitive therapy by public health systems.
    16. 16. SUPPORTIVE THERAPY
    17. 17. SUPPORTIVE THERAPY Long term therapy with various attempt by a therapist by any practical means whatever to help patients deal with their emotional distress and problems in living.
    18. 18. SUPPORTIVE THERAPY PRINCIPLE: • Focus on conscious mind rather than interpreting unconscious • deals more superficially, but more immediately with the daily events patient’s life. • Not probing into the past and changing the personality
    19. 19. SUPPORTIVE THERAPY Yet even the most mature people lose their ability to provide support from within when they are excessively scared or in pain TECHNIQUES: – Ventilation. – Environmental modification – Persuasion – Re education – Reassurance
    20. 20. SUPPORTIVE THERAPY INDICATIONS: • Person may be too disturbed to cope effectively with day-to-day problems • Depressed • Schizophrenic • sexually disturbed • Neurotic • may be in crisis • chronically ill patient
    21. 21. ROLE OF THERAPIST IN SUPPORTIVE THERAPY • Inform patients about their illness and about how to manage it and how to adjust to it. • Intercede on a patient’s behalf with various authorities, including schools and social agencies, and with the patient’s familyindeed • Explain his patient’s behavior to others; at the same time, he may have to interpret the meaning of other people’s behavior to his patient.
    22. 22. ROLE OF THERAPIST IN SUPPORTIVE THERAPY • Educate him to the unwritten but crucial rules that govern all social interaction. • Encourages his patient to expand his/her interests in the world by making friends, or by going to school or to work. • Encourage participation in sports or hobbies. • serves as a model for proper and appropriate behavior.
    23. 23. As is usual in psychiatry, however, these distinctions blur in practice. No treatment of the emotionally disturbed can be applied as a formula. Supportive therapy can be done by anyone who care
    24. 24. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
    25. 25. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY Application of goal oriented, purposeful activity in the assessment and treatment of individuals with psychological, physical or developmental disabilities.
    26. 26. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY AIM: • To enable the patient to achieve a healthy balance of occupations through the development of skills that will allow him to function at a level of satisfactory to himself and others.
    27. 27. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SCOPE: • Children • Adolescents • Adults • Elderly patients
    28. 28. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SETTINGS • • • • • • • • • Psychiatric hospitals Nursing homes Rehabilitation centers Special schools Community group homes Community mental health centers Day care centers Halfway homes Deaddiction centers
    29. 29. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ADVANTAGES • Help to develop social skills and provide an outlet for self expression • Strengthens ego defenses • Develops a more realistic view of the self in relation to others.
    30. 30. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY INDICATIONS 1. Medical condition: rheumatoid arthritis 2. Learning disability: autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) 3. Mental health condition: bipolar disorder
    31. 31. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY • PROCESS ASSESSMENT FORMULATION OF GOALS DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPY PLAN SETTING UP FURTHER GOALS EVALUATION IMPLEMENTATION
    32. 32. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY TYPE OF ACTIVITIES: 1. Diversional 2. Therapeutic
    33. 33. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS SUGGESTED OCCUPATIONAL ACTIVITIES •Anxiety disorders Easy to learn Kitchen tasks, washing, sweeping, mopping, weeding gardens •Depressive disorder •Manic disorder Achievable tasks Crafts, mowing lawn, weeding gardens Non competitive activities Use of energy Frequently changes Raking grass, sweeping
    34. 34. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PSYCHIATRIC SUGGESTED TYPE OF ACTIVITIES: OCCUPATIONAL DISORDERS ACTIVITIES •Schizophrenia (Paranoid) Non competitive activities Require concentration e.g. puzzles, scrabble •Schizophrenia (Catatonic) Active involvement Continuous supervision to client e.g. molding clay, metal work •Antisocial personality Task enhance self esteem e.g. drawing, painting
    35. 35. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS SUGGESTED OCCUPATIONAL ACTIVITIES •Dementia Group and Short time activities Require less concentration Familiar activities •Substance abuse Group activities Talent oriented e.g. planning an interview with celebrity •Mental retardation Repetitive work Achievement oriented tasks e.g. cover making, candle making, packaging goods
    36. 36. BIBLIOGRAPHY • Burns, David D. Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy. Avon Books: New York, NY, 1999. • Rupke, Stuart J., David Blecke, Marjorie Renfrow. "Cognitive Therapy for Depression." American Family Physician. 73.1 (January 2006):83-6 • Sreevani. R; A guide to mental health and psychiatric nursing; edition 2; Jaypee brothers, medical publishers (P) LTD, New Delhi, pg no. 190,196-198. • http://www.beckinstitute.org/history-of-cbt/ • http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/fightingfear/201306/supportive-psychotherapy
    37. 37. ANY QUESTION?
    38. 38. Reflect on Your Negative Thinking Identify & Fight Negative Thoughts Live an Optimistic Life

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