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World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
World war one_poetry1
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World war one_poetry1

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  • 1. World War One Poetry.L/O: Learning to understand the importance of context to poetry
  • 2. Copy the statements and add a score out of five dependingon your confidence with the subject (5 = really confident)1. I can identify similes and metaphors.2. I can identify enjambment and alliteration in poems.3. I know the effect of similes and metaphors.4. I can write about poems using pee.5. I can explain why the context of a poem is important to the understanding of the poem.6. I can compare two poems confidently.7. I can explain the different purposes of a poem using evidence to support my ideas.8. I can evaluate a poem and justify my views using evidence.
  • 3. Revision of poetic terms: Draw in back of book.Poetic term DefinitionSimileMetaphorPersonificationEnjambmentAlliterationStanzaOnomatopoeia
  • 4. The context of WW1• What do you know about WW1?• In pairs make a list of any information that you know.(5min)
  • 5. Some information• 1914-1918• Fought between Germany and England/France/ Belgium and other Allied countries.• Mainly fought in Trenches.• British war dead:• About 880,000 men from the United Kingdom, plus a further 200,000 from other countries in the British Empire and Commonwealth. German dead: approximately 1,808,000
  • 6. Some video context of WW1• Over the top• The sniper• The end
  • 7. Some of the dead.
  • 8. The men were convinced to fight through effective propaganda. How are these effective?
  • 9. Now read the poem ‘Who’s for the game’ (Jessie Pope)• Who’s for the game, the biggest that’s played, The red crashing game of a fight? Who’ll grip and tackle the job unafraid? And who thinks he’d rather sit tight? Who’ll toe the line for the signal to ‘Go!’? Who’ll give his country a hand? Who wants a turn to himself in the show? And who wants a seat in the stand? Who knows it won’t be a picnic – not much- Yet eagerly shoulders a gun? Who would much rather come back with a crutch Than lie low and be out of the fun? Come along, lads – But you’ll come on all right – For there’s only one course to pursue, Your country is up to her neck in a fight, And she’s looking and calling for you.
  • 10. Who’s for the game?• In pairs decide how this poem persuades people to join up:• Do you think that it successfully achieves its purpose? How?• Who is this poem targeting?• What does it compare war to and how?• Which techniques can you find?
  • 11. Choose one of the following:• Either write your own enlisting poem/verse.• Or• Design your own Recruiting poster based around the ideas in the poem.

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