Careers In Educational And Child Psychology

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Presentation by Steve Rooney, part of the Careers in Psychology event at The University of Manchester, March 2010.

Presentation by Steve Rooney, part of the Careers in Psychology event at The University of Manchester, March 2010.

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  • 1. CAREERS IN EDUCATIONAL & CHILD PSYCHOLOGY Steve Rooney Principal Educational & Child Psychologist Oldham Council Slides from Psychology Careers Event March 2010 All of our handouts are copyright MLP, Careers and Employability Division
  • 2. INTRODUCTION
    • Educational and Child Psychologists have:
    • a degree conferring graduate basis for registration (GBR) with the British Psychological Society (BPS)
    • experience of paid work with children and young people - including planned and evaluated interventions - prior to applying for training
    • completed a course of professional training in Educational & Child Psychology (which is now a three year Doctoral programme)
  • 3. TRAINING
    • Training courses generally take students who have a first or upper second class degree, and have experience of working in one of the following fields:
    • Teaching
    • Classroom assistant, learning mentor, behaviour mentor
    • Education Welfare Officer
    • Youth worker
    • Counsellor
    • Assistant psychologist
    • Other paid employment which involves planned and evaluated work with children or young people
  • 4. TRAINING COURSES
    • Currently, postgraduate courses are based at the following English & Welsh Universities:
    • Manchester, Birmingham, Sheffield, Nottingham, Newcastle, Cardiff, Bristol, Exeter, Southampton, University College London, Institute of Education (London), Tavistock Centre, University of East London.
    • There are also two courses in Scotland and one in Ireland (see BPS website)
  • 5. STUDY
    • As part of your post-graduate training, you will study:
    • Typical and atypical child and adolescent development
    • The psychology of teaching and learning
    • Working with children, young people and adults
    • How groups function
    • How people communicate and maintain relationships
    • Contextual and individual assessment
    • Problem solving strategies
    • Therapeutic techniques (SFBT, CBT, Rogerian counselling…)
    • Research methodology & statistics
    • Working within a multi-agency context
    • Child neuropsychology
    • Additional & complex educational needs
    • Diversity and inclusion
    • Legislative frameworks
  • 6. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER TRAINING COURSE
    • Overview 2009-2012
    • 3 years full time – approximately 10 places
    • All applications to be administered through the Children’s Workforce Development Council at [email_address]
  • 7. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER: YEAR BY YEAR
    • Year 1 – five days per week University and private study, including substantial fieldwork placement
    • Year 2 – three days per week fieldwork placement in a local authority; two days per week at the University and private study
    • Year 3 – four days a week fieldwork placement in a local authority; one day a week at the University or private study.
    • Total 300 days supervised fieldwork over three years
  • 8. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER PROGRAMME UNITS
    • Research in Applied Educational and Child Psychology
    • Social, Organisational and Ecological Context
    • Child and Adolescent Development
    • Mental Health and Well-being
    • Communication and Interpersonal Effectiveness
  • 9. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER PROGRAMME ORIENTATION
    • Research within evidence-based practice
    • Use of frameworks for professional practice
    • Pupil and parent participation
    • Adult learning with problem-based learning cycle
    • Therapeutic intervention and personal development
    • Flexible needs-based support
  • 10. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER ASSESSMENT
    • 3 assignments (10,000 words each)
    • A professional practice portfolio (20,000 words approximately)
    • A thesis (40,000-50,000 words)
  • 11. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER THESIS RESEARCH-SOME EXAMPLES
    • Process of re-integration from Pupil Referral Unit
    • Cyber-bullying
    • Family support for parents of young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders
    • Effective education for children in residential care
    • The effect of nurture group practices on executive functions and social perception
    • Analytical evaluation of the ‘Seasons for Growth’ programme for change and loss
  • 12. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER APPLICATION PROCESS
    • Likely to be oversubscribed
    • Person specification is central to selection
    • 24 interviews – usually held in March
    • Eight minute presentation on your experience of planned and evaluated work with individuals or groups of children
    • Written task
    • Group task
    • Five questions to answer in individual interview
  • 13. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER APPLICATION PROCESS
    • Offers of places sent out by early April
    • Applicant responds to offer by mid April
    • Offers of places may be made after mid April if several applicants decline the offer
  • 14. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER: TEACHING AND LEARNING
    • PROBLEM BASED LEARNING (PBL)
    • PBL is a student-centred method of extending knowledge and understanding
    • Originated in medical settings in the 1960s
    • Utilises prior knowledge
    • Presents problems in the context in which they are likely to be encountered
    • Allows students to set learning objectives based on perceived knowledge gaps
  • 15. Typical PBL Cycle 1. Group meets to discuss the problem. Learning objectives agreed 2.Group meets to discuss findings. Further information about the problem provided 4. Group disseminates their case formulation/strategy to colleagues 3 .Group meets to discuss how to approach the problem. Dissemination planned Research/ private study Research/ private study Research/ private study
  • 16. UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER TEACHING AND LEARNING
    • TYPES OF ASSESSMENT
    • DYNAMIC
    • CURRICULUM BASED/CRITERION REFERENCED
    • STANDARDISED
    • ECOSYSTEMIC/INTERACTIONAL
  • 17. SOME READING
  • 18. WORK SETTINGS
    • Educational & Child Psychologists work in a variety of settings:
    • Local Authorities (Children’s Services)
    • Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services
    • Universities
    • Special Schools
    • Voluntary Sector
    • Private Practice
  • 19. ROLE
    • Most Educational & Child Psychologists work in Local Authority settings where they will have a patch of schools, early years provision, and children out of borough
    • They provide:
    • * consultation
    • * assessment
    • * intervention
    • * training/research/development
    • They work in multi-agency contexts with education, health, social care and voluntary agencies
  • 20. Typical work activities
        • assessing young people ’ s learning and emotional needs, which involves working directly with them and observing and consulting with multi-agency teams to advise on the best approaches and provisions to support their learning and development;
        • developing and supporting therapeutic and behaviour management programmes;
  • 21. Work activities contd.
        • designing and developing courses on topics such as bullying for parents, teachers and others involved with the education of children and young people;
        • writing reports to make formal recommendations on action to be taken, including formal statements;
        • advising, negotiating, persuading and supporting teachers, parents and other education professionals;
  • 22. Work activities contd.
        • attending case-conferences involving multidisciplinary teams on how best to meet the social, emotional, behavioural and learning needs of the children and young people in their care;
        • prioritising effectiveness: the context and environment that influences the child ’ s development is seen as increasingly important;
  • 23. Work activities contd.
        • liaising with other professionals and facilitating meetings, discussions and courses;
        • developing and reviewing policies;
        • conducting active research.
  • 24. SPECIALISATION
    • After a few years generic experience an Educational & Child Psychologist may specialise in one or more areas of work.
    • Some examples include:
    • Early Years
    • Behavioural, Social and Emotional Development
    • Complex Learning Needs
    • Sensory Impairment
    • Autistic Spectrum Disorder
    • Looked After Children
    • Speech, Language and Communication Difficulties
    • Medical and Neurological Needs
    • Quite a lot of etc….
  • 25. A DAY IN THE LIFE OF … An Educational & Child Psychologist
    • A typical day starts with a trip to the office to check in-tray and e-mails:
    • High priority work such as an enquiry from a parent or an urgent memorandum from the education office are dealt with before collecting files and materials for a school visit
  • 26. A day in the life…
    • 8:40am: set off on a six mile drive to the school for 9:00am appointment. The school is situated within a large housing estate on the outskirts of the borough, on the border with Manchester
  • 27. A day in the life…
    • On arrival I am greeted by the head-teacher and special needs co-ordinator (SENCO). I quickly settle down to my consultations. The first child they want to discuss has specific learning difficulties and is not making progress with basic skills, the second child is being investigated for possible autistic spectrum disorder, and the school need advice on behavioural, social and emotional management. The third child has a developmental disorder of a neurological nature which has resulted in visual difficulties, seizures and problems accessing the curriculum
  • 28. A day in the life…
    • Once I have talked to the staff about programmes they can do in school, and helped them formulate the individual education programmes for all three children, I see the third child individually to complete my assessments.
  • 29. A day in the life…
    • This time I do a neuropsychological battery of tests followed by a consultation with his parents, teacher and SENCO. I explain the process of statutory assessment and give them some information about what it would mean if he was given a Statement of special educational needs. Following a quick coffee with the SENCO we decide to set an agenda for my next scheduled visit in six weeks time
  • 30. A day in the life of…
    • It is lunch time by now, so I set off back to the office, eating a sandwich on the way (not necessarily! - important point!!) I write file notes for the morning’s visits, write a report on a child I saw yesterday, and finalise preparations for a 3:30 staff-training session at a special resourced unit for children with hearing impairment
  • 31. A day in the life…
    • This time I am working with a trainee psychologist who is delivering most of the training. At the end of the session we collect the evaluation sheets and head back to the office. We have a short supervision where we discuss what went well and how things could be changed. Another quick look at my e-mails then I head back home with an article to read from the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry for a seminar I am preparing with a CAMHS worker next week.
    • Then open a bottle of wine…go to the cinema….play some music…see friends…..watch the football….. very important!
  • 32. Any questions ?