Technical, Tangible, Social (Xerox Research Center)
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Technical, Tangible, Social (Xerox Research Center)

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A version of my "technical, tangible, social" talk, given at Xerox Research Center in Webster, NY, August 2009.

A version of my "technical, tangible, social" talk, given at Xerox Research Center in Webster, NY, August 2009.

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  • Obviously we care about the technical—we wouldn’t be at a conference on Information Technology if we didn’t recognize its importance.But we care about the tangible, as well, even (or perhaps especially!) in the context of the technical—the iPhone is an obvious example. It feels good. It looks good. We want to touch it, hold, caress it. (The Google phone? Not so much.)Apple understands the importance of the design of physical objects—Jonathan Ive’s role in the company is evidence of that. http://www.flickr.com/photos/kitcowan/731269699
  • We’re learning that objects can be both beautiful and functional, that not all the information has to be served up in endless piles of text. We can get information in an ambient, unobtrusive form—even from technology-based systems. (We’ve always done this in the world around us.)Ambient orb, cube, home joule
  • RFID reader, with RFID “stamps” for items that don’t already have them. A “razor-blade model” for technology revenue?
  • Once things can interact with the Internet and with each other, they become inherently social objects. Increasingly, the technology to create these kinds of social objects is becoming affordable and usable.
  • “In conference call noone can hear you knit” – by permission of Patrick Barber, http://www.flickr.com/photos/hollyandpatrick/1908914304/“Knitting” – CC Licensed by Tim Ducket, http://www.flickr.com/photos/tim_d/558954300/ (need larger version if there is one available)
  • http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?ref=cat1_gallery_2&listing_id=16431796
  • Page2PubTakes web pages and allows you to compile them into a print-friendly booklet. Being piloted with wikis first, but usable for a variety of websites when finished. One of the most popular exhibits at RIT’s Imagine festival this year.
  • Intro Animation (click to play)We’ll add an “RSVP” link that will take the user to a login/register screen.
  • All these paper models were created by Elouise. Some of them will be papercraft models printed in the paper so that people can create their own.
  • Jigsaw puzzle on Mondays, Slider puzzle on WednesdaysAdvertiser logo can be watermarked on image(s)Pictures can be provided by us or by advertisers (must be related to game themes)Custom message when level is finished; can offer link to advertiser and/or coupons$500 per game per week
  • Coded tickets provided at 5-6 locations related to weekly themeCustom coupons can be printed on ticketAdvertiser location can be located near a landmark if it’s not related to themeCost: $500 per week
  • One weekend puzzle or activity, probably a crossword puzzleOne weekday puzzle, sometimes collaborativeOne advertiser will receive 6 colx 2” full color print ads with each game$7000 for package (14 ads)

Technical, Tangible, Social (Xerox Research Center) Presentation Transcript

  • 1.
  • 2.
  • 3. Technical/Tangible/Social
  • 4. “One day we will look back with embarrassment on this era when all of our virtual experiences were trapped behind a screen. This advance will have great implications for the role of games within society, and the wider possibilities of tangible game experiences could make the word ‘game’ insufficient to describe what we are doing.”
    - Game design legend Masaya Matsuura
    “One day we will look back with embarrassment on this era when all of our virtual experiences were trapped behind a screen. This advance will have great implications for the role of games within society, and the wider possibilities of tangible game experiences could make the word ‘game’ insufficient to describe what we are doing.”
    - Game design legend Masaya Matsuura
  • 5. “One day we will look back with embarrassment on this era when all of our virtual experiences were trapped behind a screen. This advance will have great implications for the role of computing within society, and the wider possibilities of tangible computing experiences could make the word ‘computing’ insufficient to describe what we are doing.”
  • 6. Flickr: Kit Cowan
  • 7.
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  • 9.
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  • 11.
  • 12.
  • 13.
  • 14. Flickr: Patrick Barber
    Flickr: Tim Duckett
  • 15.
  • 16.
  • 17. Etsy: Littleput Books™
  • 18.
  • 19.
  • 20. Flickr: Liz Lawley
  • 21.
  • 22.
  • 23. RIT OPL: Page to Pub
  • 24.
  • 25.
  • 26.
  • 27.
  • 28.
  • 29.
  • 30. LSC Projects: Social Genius
  • 31. LSC Projects: PULP
  • 32. Picture the Impossible:A city-based adventure game
    Created bythe RIT Lab for Social Computing
    andthe Rochester Democrat & Chronicle
  • 33. Can you picture an entire community coming together to play a game? A game that helps them learn about their city? A game that encourages them to support local charities?
    It may sound impossible, but we don’t think it is. And we’re asking you to join us in picturing the impossible…
  • 34. Intro Animation
  • 35. Two-Tier Registration
  • 36. SocialCollaborationProject:Foodlink
    The Watchmaker:Boys & Girls Club
    The Marquis:Golisano Children’s Hospital
  • 37. Initial Interface
  • 38. Web-based Casual Games
  • 39.
  • 40. Location Games
  • 41.
  • 42.
  • 43. Newspaper Games