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    Seminar 2 presentation, Project Communicating Biodiversity Seminar 2 presentation, Project Communicating Biodiversity Presentation Transcript

    • Communicating Biodiversity Storybook Design Seminar 2, 8th Aug, 2013
    • Topics to Explore Diversity is transformed into monocultures. CULTURAL DIVERSITY is born out of the planet’s BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY. Urban migrants are not economic refugees but ecological refugees, displaced by building of dams, mines, deforestation. The biggest ally in demand for an ecologically / socially sound environment is womankind. We do not yet know how to construct an INDICATOR (social / ecological / economic) to reflect the change. Relevance Is a growing concern, will lead to no alternatives. Affects lifestyles, economy, ecology. Affects many classes. Speaks about loss and conservation. Closely linked and easy to relate to. Interesting because culture is multi-faceted. Involves a smaller segment of society. Focuses on rights of access. Might get technical. Focuses on one gender, may fail in communicating responsibility. Useful as a starting point, important for city-dwellers, indicators can be identified through participatory methods. { Purpose: To communicate Biodiversity to the wider public. }
    • Topics to Explore Diversity is transformed into monocultures. CULTURAL DIVERSITY is born out of the planet’s BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY. Urban migrants are not economic refugees but ecological refugees, displaced by building of dams, mines, deforestation. The biggest ally in demand for an ecologically / socially sound environment is womankind. We do not yet know how to construct an INDICATOR (social / ecological / economic) to reflect the change. Relevance Is a growing concern, will lead to no alternatives. Affects lifestyles, economy, ecology. Affects many classes. Speaks about loss and conservation. Closely linked and easy to relate to. Interesting because culture is multi-faceted. Involves a smaller segment of society. Focuses on rights of access. Might get technical. Focuses on one gender, may fail in communicating responsibility. Useful as a starting point, important for city-dwellers, indicators can be identified through participatory methods. { Purpose: To communicate Biodiversity to the wider public. }
    • Understanding Monocultures In Cities In Agriculture Characteristics Malls Supermarkets I.T. Centres Education Centres Generated by Capitalism, Dependent on Capitalism Affect code of conduct, behaviour Affect local / indigenous varities Affect consumption patterns Eliminates alternatives Rice Wheat Eucalyptus Acacia Run by western standards, owned by American / European nations. Serve as human resource centers. Controlled, surveillance, No bargains, Shipping and importing. Local markets, products, grocers, local economy affected. No communication with the producer. Rise in consumerism, dependence on international standards and products. Local brands, cheaper alternatives are disappearing. Imported, G.M. seeds. Dependent on chemical pesticides, fertilizers. Turn towards monoculture, prone to epidemics, debts, suicudes. Millets, ragi, bajra, jowar dropped in demand and cultivation. Land use shift from horticulture, biodiverse to monocultures. Dietary diversity affected, nutrition from fruits, vegetables, millets is unfulfilled. Practice of horticulture near urban areas decreasing. PDS also distributes Rice and Wheat. Do not occur in nature. To increase efficiency and productivity. To meet the demands of the masses.
    • Understanding Monocultures In Cities In Agriculture Characteristics Malls Supermarkets I.T. Centres Education Centres Generated by Capitalism, Dependent on Capitalism Affect code of conduct, behaviour Affect local / indigenous varities Affect consumption patterns Eliminates alternatives Rice Wheat Eucalyptus Acacia Run by western standards, owned by American / European nations. Serve as human resource centers. Controlled, surveillance, No bargains, Shipping and importing. Local markets, products, grocers, local economy affected. No communication with the producer. Rise in consumerism, dependence on international standards and products. Local brands, cheaper alternatives are disappearing. Imported, G.M. seeds. Dependent on chemical pesticides, fertilizers. Turn towards monoculture, prone to epidemics, debts, suicudes. Millets, ragi, bajra, jowar dropped in demand and cultivation. Land use shift from horticulture, biodiverse to monocultures. Dietary diversity affected, nutrition from fruits, vegetables, millets is unfulfilled. Practice of horticulture near urban areas decreasing. PDS also distributes Rice and Wheat.
    • Conversations
    • “Most of our customers for regular organic provisions are from the upper class or are non-indians. We supply several cartons of tea to offices. We are tied with several farmers across the country.” - Organics , Fabindia. “To increase the income of these farmers we encourage many of them to grow medicinal, aromatic and dye plants as intercrops, or to sustainably collect wild herbs that are already growing on their land. “ - Phalada Agro, Supply to Fabindia, 24 Letter Mantra “Though biodiversity means lower land usage per crop, we source the produce from several farmers as a co-operative and maintain productivity.” -Buffalo Back Organics “For the past year, the only pest-control I use is biodiversity. Each pest has a predator and in such a way, an eco-system is maintained.” - Hamsa Organic Farm “The problem with our consumption patterns is not the quantity but the quality of food. Horticulture suffers the most in biodiversity around urban areas, making fruits and vegetables less available and accessible.” - Govind Shivkumar, LGT Venture Philantrophy
    • Offering Map
    • Offering Map Biodiversity communicated through dietary diversity addresses a relevant, vital need. Biological Diversity affects Cultural Diversity Gradual shift towards monocultures. Eliminating alternatives. Elders are the custodians of traditional knowledge, endemic ingredients. Need for documentation. Upper Middle / Middle class create consumption hubs and contribute largely to patterns. They tend to be aspirational. Target for communication. Organic farms hold the potential to become biodiverse as opposed to G.M. / Monoculture / Intensive farming. Has the potential to market biodiversity. Conflict between bodiversity and market needs. Farmers, lower class most affected by changes in the demands. Health, Environemental and Economic benefits of biodiversity, healthier, inexpensive, nutritious. A smart choice. Can we map our indicators? Play, Meaning Meaning Story, Symphony, Story Design Empathy Symphony, Design
    • Storytelling Character / Persona: Structure
    • Storytelling StructureCharacter / Persona: The one who witnesses change The Shopping Bag: Reflects the personality of the user. Has witnessed change in consumer patterns / behaviour. Is a vessel, ever changing, does not resist. Removed perspective, observing change and reflecting. Comment on what might happen in the future. see think wonder Observations. How it was used earlier, how it is used now. See the market change, his user change, the environment change. Map changes for reader. Think about how the change is affecting health, economy, environment. Identify the issues and who is affected. Wonder if the change is for the better. How will the future be if this continues? How can we conserve what we have before it is lost? What is the role of the bag? Can the form be similar to a shopping bag, can it be a shopping companion for a consumer ? Can the bag be disassociated from consumerism and become a catalyst in biodiversity conservation? Eg. To transport saplings, to become a companion on a nature trek.
    • Storytelling StructureCharacter / Persona: The one who embarks upon a journey The Sack of Grain: Different connotations to farmer, scientist, consumer. Undergoes several changes before it reaches the market. Can take the reader through many experiences. Can develop resistance, nature vs. nurture. Initiation Seperation Transformation Return Mundane world. Lives in a farm with several species. Harvested, going to the market to be made into flour. Instead heads towards lab to be modified. Meets other species. Observes city-life, consumerism. Distressed by lack of diversity. Realises the effect ofthe atrocities. Slowly becomes resilient to the change. thrives only in diversity, conveys the importance. Sent back to the farm, flourishes without harming diversity, becomes exemplary. Can the reader empathize with the journey as his own? Can we provide the reader ways to chart his own journey, trials and triumphs?
    • Storytelling StructureCharacter / Persona: The one who becomes marginalized The Monkey: Playful, represents habitat loss, encroachment. Shares a tense relationship with humans, a contrast to harmony. Observes, mimics, learns. Diet changes with humans. Dependent on waste / stealth. The challenge will be to keep interspersing the plot with peaks and troughs to keep the reader interested. How can we also involve the reader and their own experiences in the short story? Illustrate the conflict between living in harmony with other species. Heighten and exaggerate. Statis Trigger Conflict surprise Critical Choice Climax Return
    • Resources On Monociltures: http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/article/agriculture_02 Agrobiodiversity and Food: http://www.bioversityinternational.org/?id=5597 Monoculture of the Mind: http://permaculturenews.org/2013/04/25/tackling-monoculture-of-the-mind/ FAO on monotony: http://www.fao.org/getinvolved/food-monotony-boring-and-risky/en/ FAO on biodiversity, Slow Food and Biodiversity: http://www.fao.org/fileadmin/user_upload/newsroom/docs/2012-03-25-universi- ty-of-gastronomic-sciences-lectio-aulamagna-DG-speech-en.pdf On millets: http://thealternative.in/environment/no-quinoa-for-me-thanks/ Bhaskar Save: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6z6-GD2POY Nancy Duarte: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nYFpuc2Umk National Sample Survey, transition in food consumption: http://wcd.nic.in/research/nti1947/6.%20Consumption%20expenditure.pdf Eucalyptus Monocultures: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/sep/26/monoculture-forests- africa-south-america