Designing Social Software

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This is a presentation I gave at Intuit for their "Social Lab" based on our work designing social software at Yahoo.

This is a presentation I gave at Intuit for their "Social Lab" based on our work designing social software at Yahoo.

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  • We could talk about each of these, none is the one "right" way to do social, but my personal interest are "social" activities that combine to create something larger than the sum of its parts. So I'm not going to talk much about: Chat, status, social media. Wine and cheese partyKegger: Drinking and smokingChurchObama in Berlin (one to many, many to one, many to many, public or private)Child naming ceremony

Transcript

  • 1. Designing Social Software
      • Illustration by Bernard Kerr
      • Micah Alpern: Yahoo! Search
  • 2. What is Social?
  • 3. One ->many
    • social
  • 4. many -> one
    • social
  • 5. Small Groups, status
    • social
  • 6. informal
    • social
  • 7. size, duration, intensity, exclusivity
    • social
  • 8. Architecture of participation
      • Social activities that combine to create something larger than the sum of their parts. People coming together and through their individual action created something amazing.
    Tim O’Reilly
  • 9.  
  • 10. Aids quilt
    • 54 Tons of community participation
  • 11. Oxford ENGLISH DICTIONARY
    • it would take 120 years to type the 59 million words of the OED 2nd edition
  • 12. Wikipedia
  • 13. Wikipedia
  • 14. Mechanical turk: sheep market
    • 10,000 sheep, two cents at a time
  • 15. Yahoo! Answers
  • 16. Yahoo! Answers
  • 17. How you can use social software to build aggregate value * Tom Coats: “Greater than the sum of its parts”
  • 18. How:
    • An individual should get value from their contribution.
    Tom Coats: “Greater than the sum of its parts”
  • 19. How:
    • An individual should get value from their contribution.
    • These contributions should provide value to their peers as well.
    Tom Coats: “Greater than the sum of its parts”
  • 20. How:
    • An individual should get value from their contribution.
    • These contributions should provide value to their peers as well.
    • The organization that hosts the service should derive aggregate value and be able to expose it back to the users.
    Tom Coats: “Greater than the sum of its parts”
  • 21. How:
    • An individual should get value from their contribution.
    • These contributions should provide value to their peers as well.
    • The organization that hosts the service should derive aggregate value and be able to expose it back to the users.
    Tom Coats: “Greater than the sum of its parts” INDIVIDUAL MOTIVES
  • 22. How:
    • An individual should get value from their contribution.
    • These contributions should provide value to their peers as well.
    • The organization that hosts the service should derive aggregate value and be able to expose it back to the users.
    Tom Coats: “Greater than the sum of its parts” SOCIAL VALUE INDIVIDUAL MOTIVES
  • 23. How:
    • An individual should get value from their contribution.
    • These contributions should provide value to their peers as well.
    • The organization that hosts the service should derive aggregate value and be able to expose it back to the users.
    Tom Coats: “Greater than the sum of its parts” BUSINESS / ORGANIZATIONAL VALUE SOCIAL VALUE INDIVIDUAL MOTIVES
  • 24. Example: Flickr
    • Individual Motives
    • Social Value
    • Business & Organizational Value
  • 25. Two approaches: to generating aggregate value to generating aggregate value
  • 26. Consensus many contributions make one voice Polyphony many voices with emergent order
  • 27. Consensus many contributions make one voice Polyphony many voices with emergent order
  • 28. Consensus many contributions make one voice Polyphony many voices with emergent order Generates canonical or definitive representations of data.
  • 29. Consensus many contributions make one voice Polyphony many voices with emergent order Generates canonical or definitive representations of data.
  • 30. Consensus many contributions make one voice Polyphony many voices with emergent order Generates canonical or definitive representations of data. Generates lots of material, makes it comprehensible
  • 31. Polyphony
    • What's the motivation? Personal, Social, Community
    • When designing the incentives: Actions/behaviors you want to incent Points == crack (use with care) Competition can hamper cooperation Thumb rating != quality (fine for engagement)
    • Social signals are key to relevance. Implicate signals are better.
  • 32. Consensus many contributions make one voice
  • 33. Consensus many contributions make one voice Fernanda Viegas: History Flow
  • 34. Consensus many contributions make one voice
    • 32 PAGES
    • 218 REFERENCES
    • 16 ILLUSTRATIONS
  • 35. Consensus many contributions make one voice
    • 1 PAGE
    • 0 REFERENCES
    • 0 ILLUSTRATIONS
  • 36.
    • wikitorial
    PROJECT DATE CLIENT 2005 LA TIMES
  • 37. How does wikipedia work? PROJECT DATE CLIENT SEPT 2008 PHOEBE AYERS , CHARLES MATT HEWS, BEN YATES
  • 38. How does Wikipedia work?
    • Cultural & social norms
    • Peripheral awareness
    • Transparency
    • Accountability
    • Policy: Community defined processes for self governance
  • 39. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 40. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 41. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 42. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 43. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 44. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 45. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 46. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 47. DATE CLIENT SESSION 5 WP:LOST
  • 48. How does Wikipedia work?
    • Cultural & social norms
    • Peripheral awareness
    • Transparency
    • Accountability
    • Policy: Community defined processes for self governance
  • 49. 5 Pillars, WP:NPOV, WP:ADMIN, WP:Patrol
    • Values -> Attract certain people -> Cultural Norms -> Policies and roles
  • 50. Commons-based governance (offline)
    • Elinor Ostrom’s Research
  • 51. Featured article process
  • 52. yochai benkler: commons based peer production The Work
    • Divided it up:
      • Granular
    • Modular
    • Integratable
  • 53. The People
    • Self-selective
        • In or out mechanism
    • Communication
    • Trust construction
    • Norm creation
    • Transparency
    yochai benkler: commons based peer production
  • 54. Lessons
    • "Wise" crowds don't happen automatically
    • You must design the incentive structure when you design the product. Look for win, win, wins.
    • Make sure you have the right people when you start.
    • Make sure there is personal value, social value, and community value to their actions.
  • 55. Lessons
    • treat people with respect Golden Rule: Would you use this incentive with your own team at Intuit?
    • culture matters a lot : The community has to believe it and own it. Your culture defines what you value and how things grow.
  • 56. Where to learn more
    • Fernanda Viegas
    • Tom Coats
    • James Surowiecki
    • Phoebe Ayers
    • Jon Udell
    • Yochai Benkler
    • Clay Sherky
  • 57. Thank you
    • Micah Alpern
    • email: alpern@yahoo-inc.com
    • twitter: malpern