FOREWORDBut in science the credit goes tothe man who convinces the world,not to the man to whom the ideafirst occurs.Sir F...
JOURNAL IMPACT FACTOR - (THOMSON REUTERS)Developed in the 60’s Eugene Garfield and Irving Sher To help select journals f...
JOURNAL CITATION REPORTSThe JCR provides quantitative tools for ranking, evaluating, categorizing, andcomparing journals (...
THE IMPACT FACTORJournal Z IF 2011=All citations from Thomsons Reuters journals in 2011 to papers in journal ZNumber of ci...
THE IMPACT FACTORIntroduced in 1960’s by Eugene Garfield: ISI2009 and 20102011IF=5Articles published in 2009-2010were cite...
HOW THE JIF SHOULD BE USEDWisely!Thomson doesn’t depend on it alone to assess the usefulness ofjournals so neither should ...
THREE PROBLEMSNegotiableIrreproducibleNot mathematically sound
NEGOTIABLEPLoS Medicine, IF 2-11 (8.4)Current Biology IF from 7 to 11 in 2003 Bought by Cell press in 2001
NOT REPRODUCIBLERockefeller University Press buys their data from TRUp to 19% deviation from published recordsSecond datas...
NOT MATHEMATICALLY SOUNDLeft-skewed distributionsWeak correlation of individual article citation rate with journal IF
HOW IS ‘IMPACT’ MEASURED?“My article was publishedin a journal withan Impact Factor of 3.751”What the …?
SO, HOW COULD ‘IMPACT’ BE MEASURED?Where the work is published JournalRankCitations scholarly, hyperlinks, social bookma...
SO, HOW COULD ‘IMPACT’ BE MEASURED?Media/blog coverage Which sources are considered the most important?Policy development...
"NOT EVERYTHINGTHAT CAN BE COUNTED COUNTS,AND NOT EVERYTHINGTHAT COUNTS CAN BE COUNTED."Albert Einstein
SOME SUGGESTIONS
WHAT IS A GOOD SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE?Novelty Communication
DISTILLATIONBefore writing‘distillate’ your resultsto keep only 2-3 trendsthat show an advanceversus existingknowledge.
NOVELTYHow to select the new result?Think of:• Initial hypothesis• Hypothesis reformulation• Lab seminar• Meeting poster, ...
CLEARIf you can’t explain somethingsimply, you don’t understand itwell.Albert Einstein• Do not make science ‘secret’• Do n...
IMAGESDraw imagesshowing imaginationImages communicate100 times betterthan text
SOCIAL MEDIAShare yourfindings…And get cited
CONCLUSIONSNo single ‘perfect’ JIFObjective tools have a role and can contribute to the evaluation of research qualitywhen...
Impact factor
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Impact factor

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This lecture gives you all you need to know about impact factor in scientific publishing. What is it, how to calculate it, and how to use it.

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Impact factor

  1. 1. FOREWORDBut in science the credit goes tothe man who convinces the world,not to the man to whom the ideafirst occurs.Sir Francis Darwin
  2. 2. JOURNAL IMPACT FACTOR - (THOMSON REUTERS)Developed in the 60’s Eugene Garfield and Irving Sher To help select journals for theSCIJournal Citation Reports firstproduced in 1975
  3. 3. JOURNAL CITATION REPORTSThe JCR provides quantitative tools for ranking, evaluating, categorizing, andcomparing journals (Thomson Reuters)The Impact Factor is one of these toolsDerived using citation data in the Science Citation Index and the Social ScienceCitation IndexHelps determine a publication’s impact and influence in the global researchcommunity (Thomson Reuters)Widely accepted and used
  4. 4. THE IMPACT FACTORJournal Z IF 2011=All citations from Thomsons Reuters journals in 2011 to papers in journal ZNumber of citable articles published in journal Z in 2009 & 2010
  5. 5. THE IMPACT FACTORIntroduced in 1960’s by Eugene Garfield: ISI2009 and 20102011IF=5Articles published in 2009-2010were cited an average of 5 times in 2011.citations articles
  6. 6. HOW THE JIF SHOULD BE USEDWisely!Thomson doesn’t depend on it alone to assess the usefulness ofjournals so neither should anyone elseIt should be used with ‘informed peer review’ (lots of thingsinfluence citation rates)
  7. 7. THREE PROBLEMSNegotiableIrreproducibleNot mathematically sound
  8. 8. NEGOTIABLEPLoS Medicine, IF 2-11 (8.4)Current Biology IF from 7 to 11 in 2003 Bought by Cell press in 2001
  9. 9. NOT REPRODUCIBLERockefeller University Press buys their data from TRUp to 19% deviation from published recordsSecond dataset still not correct
  10. 10. NOT MATHEMATICALLY SOUNDLeft-skewed distributionsWeak correlation of individual article citation rate with journal IF
  11. 11. HOW IS ‘IMPACT’ MEASURED?“My article was publishedin a journal withan Impact Factor of 3.751”What the …?
  12. 12. SO, HOW COULD ‘IMPACT’ BE MEASURED?Where the work is published JournalRankCitations scholarly, hyperlinks, social bookmarksWeb usage Publisher platform; 3rd party locationsExpert ratings F1000; Peer Reviewers; Ed Boards etcCommunity rating & commenting Digging; Commenting; Rating etc
  13. 13. SO, HOW COULD ‘IMPACT’ BE MEASURED?Media/blog coverage Which sources are considered the most important?Policy development?Who published it? And where do they work? What did they publish before? How ‘impactful’ are they?Who is talking about it? And what authority do they have?Who is citing it ? And what authority do they have?
  14. 14. "NOT EVERYTHINGTHAT CAN BE COUNTED COUNTS,AND NOT EVERYTHINGTHAT COUNTS CAN BE COUNTED."Albert Einstein
  15. 15. SOME SUGGESTIONS
  16. 16. WHAT IS A GOOD SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE?Novelty Communication
  17. 17. DISTILLATIONBefore writing‘distillate’ your resultsto keep only 2-3 trendsthat show an advanceversus existingknowledge.
  18. 18. NOVELTYHow to select the new result?Think of:• Initial hypothesis• Hypothesis reformulation• Lab seminar• Meeting poster, oral• Scientists outside your field• Coffee breaks and friends
  19. 19. CLEARIf you can’t explain somethingsimply, you don’t understand itwell.Albert Einstein• Do not make science ‘secret’• Do not use complicated wordsto look ‘serious’• Editors hate abbreviations
  20. 20. IMAGESDraw imagesshowing imaginationImages communicate100 times betterthan text
  21. 21. SOCIAL MEDIAShare yourfindings…And get cited
  22. 22. CONCLUSIONSNo single ‘perfect’ JIFObjective tools have a role and can contribute to the evaluation of research qualitywhen used appropriately – must be aware of their limitations!More data sources available to rank journalsComplementary metrics (usage) should be used and studied furtherEvaluation: expert peer review complemented by appropriate journal ranking dataOngoing debate….

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