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Kona wahi pana
 

Kona wahi pana

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  • Ahu`ena (lit. red hot heap) Heiau is a temple that may have been used for human sacrifices as early as the 15 th century during High Chief `Umi’s reign. In the early 1800’s, Kamehameha I restored the temple and used it for religious ceremonies and other sacred practices. Six months after Kamehameha I’s death in 1819, his favorite wife, Ka`ahumanu, created a new post for herself, that of kuhina nui. She persuaded the heir to the throne, Liholiho (Kamehameha II) to abandon the kapu system. The kapu was officially broken in 1819 at the royal residence which adjoined the heiau. Liholiho & Ka`ahumanu cast aside the traditional societal structure by eating together. This illegal act of men and women eating together broke the kapu system and paved the way for missionaries who arrived later that same year. By doing so, the ancient religion was ended. Messengers were sent to all the districts of Hawai`i and to the other islands ordering heiau to be desecrated (the destruction of the temples) and the images destroyed. As a result, the heiau eventually was allowed to fall into disrepair. The area has been used for many things over the years including a boathouse and a commercial lumber yard before it fell into ruin. In 1978, with the help of the King Kamehameha Hotel, the site was recreate on a 2/3 scale replica of the original and is now registered as a National Historic Landmark.
  • The first Christian church in Hawai`i – a thatched structure bult in 1823 was constructed where the present Moku`aikaua Church stands today. A second, larger wooden church replaced the thatched building in 1826 to accommodate the expanding congregation. This structure burned to the ground in 1835. Governor Kuakini began construction of the present church on January 1, 1839 using adze-smoothed stones from the High Chief `Umi’s heiau. In the interior of the church are impressive `ōhi`a posts holding up the ceiling beams. The name Moku`aikaua may be derived from the forest land above Kailua where the `ōhi`a trees were harvested. Stone and mortar building completed in 1837 Built of stones taken from a nearby heiau and lime made of burned coral
  • Governor Kuakini constructed Hulihe`e as his home in 1838. After his death, Princess Ruth Ke`elikōlani had a hale pili (grass house) built on the palace grounds where she lived while she was governess. In 1884, King Kalākaua and Queen Kapi`olani transformed the palace to suit their Victorian taste. Hulihe`e Palace was placed on the National Register of Historic Sites in 1973. Today, it is a museum of Hawaiian relics maintained by the Daughters of HI. It is open 9:00-4:00 Monday-Saturday and closed on Sundays.

Kona wahi pana Kona wahi pana Presentation Transcript

  • NĀ WAHI PANA O KONA Noted Places of Kona HWST 100
  • KAMAKAHONU
    • Lit: The eye of the turtle
    • The small bay just west of the pier near King Kamehameha Hotel
    • In 1795, Kamehameha I won a battle which led to the unification of the Hawaiian kingdom.
    • In 1812, he moved his seat of government to Kona and ruled from this area until his death in 1819
  • AHU`ENA
  • MOKU`AIKAUA
  • HULIHE`E
    • Kona’s only existing royal residence
    • www.huliheepalace.org
  • PU`UHONUA O HŌNAUNAU
  • PU`UHONUA O HŌNAUNAU
  • PU`UHONUA O HŌNAUNAU
  •