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Halemano
 

Halemano

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    Halemano Halemano Presentation Transcript

    • Halemano: HWST 104
    • MOE ʻUHANE • Dream; to dream • Lit., soul sleep • It is believed that dreams are the doings of the ʻuhane (soul) after the body has fallen asleep • All of the things that the ʻuhane sees and remembers after the awakening of the body is the dream
    • MOE ʻUHANE • Some dreams are merely pastimes or trickery; some are riddles that one must think over and analyze; and some dreams are self-evident • It is believed that dreams foretell good and bad fortune, sickness; sacred names are given in dreams, and a song or hula may be learned in sleep • The understanding of dreams is important. Some interpretations concerning the meaning of dreams are understood throughout the islands, while others belong only to certain family groups
    • KILU – A small gourd or coconut shell, usually cut lengthwise, as used for storing small, choice objects, or to feed favorite children from – Used also as a quoit in the kilu game: the player chanted as he tossed the kilu towards an object placed in front of one of the opposite sex. If he hit the goal, he claimed a kiss