HO`OMANA:
Native Spirituality
MANA
Mana
• nvs. Supernatural or divine power, mana, miraculous
power; a powerful nation, authority; to give mana to,
to m...
AKUA
• God, goddess, supernatural spirit.
• Occasionally used to mean supernatural
quality or even a human who has
superna...
AKUA
• 4 “major” gods
– K ne: God of creationā
– K : God of warū
– Lono: God of peace,
agriculture, fertility
– Kanaloa: G...
OTHER AKUA
• Laka – Goddess of hula
• Pele – Volcano goddess
• Kapo – Goddess of sorcery
• Ma iola – God of healingʻ
• La ...
`AUM KUAĀ
• 1. nvt. Family or personal gods, deified
ancestors who might assume the shape of
sharks (all islands except Ka...
KINOLAU
• According to the Hawaiian
dictionary, kinolau are “many
forms taken by a supernatural
body” (Literally: many bod...
FINAL THOUGHTS ON AKUA
• Traditionally speaking, the relationship that
the kanaka maoli had with their akua was a
part of ...
AO
• AO KUEWA/AO `AUANA
– Spirits of the dead who were doomed to wander
forever within specific geographic area
• AO `AUMA...
If you have any
questions, please
ask them on the
Discussion Board.
Mahalo!
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107 hoomana

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  • It is based on a strong, polytheistic tradition that was the backbone of Hawaiian culture until the kapu was abolished in 1819. The entire environment – from the land, the sea, the sky, and their creatures – are suffused with meaning. Religious beliefs and practices pervaded daily life, structuring society and influencing the behavior and decisions of the kanaka maoli Natural disasters were considered clear manifestations of the gods’ displeasure.
  • A form of spiritual energy that exists in all things and creatures Mana is in everything including rocks, plants and animals Mana is found to some degree in all forms of life Primary source of mana is nā akua Ho`omana comes from the root word mana. A form of spiritual energy that exists in all things and creatures The prefix ho`o is a causative that means “to do” or “to make happen” or “to imbue with.” Thus, ho`omana literally means “to cause something to have mana.” Ho`omana was found in almost all aspects of Hawaiian culture and life – from the building of canoes, to the hunting of birds for feathers – from farming and fishing to healing and dancing. It appears all aspects of Hawaiian culture required prayer or pule that are linked to ho`omana. Thus, ho`omana makes sense if you are using prayers, because prayers are meant, when chanted or invoked to cause something to happen that you cannot do alone. Prayers were necessary to begin and complete tasks. In fact, it was generally believed that any project should be preceded by prayer, often with ritual and feasting to clear the way. 2 different types of mana Generalized, diffused personal power A specific talent or aptitude for something in particular
  • Akua served specific functions and their purpose was specified. Akua presided over particular professions/occupations. The kanaka in those professions, occupations, and affairs would actively worship the gods that dealt with the affairs that concerned them. Hawaiians were firm believers in their god(s) and that these god(s) possessed the ability to destroy enemies, safeguard them, and prosper them with all types of blessings
  • Kane – provider of sunlight, fresh water, and the life substances in nature; creator of man, symbol of life, nature, god of fresh water and sunlight Ku – Represents the male generating power; god of war and chiefs, god of the forests, canoe making, fishing Lono – God of natural phenomena such as clouds, rain and winds; God of fertility, agriculture, clouds and weather Kanaloa – God of ocean and ocean winds, god of salt water
  • Ancestor gods, family or personal gods, deified ancestors They are both relatives and gods; the guardians of the family Dwell in the eternal Pō (Pō is considered a limitless space where the sea, sky, and land are one) One of the first ways `aumakua were said to originate was by the mating of akua and kanaka When a child was born unto this union, the akua became an ancestor to a human line He took on a dual role and became an `aumakua to his descendants. For example, Pele is considered an akua as well as a familial akua or ʻaumakua to the Pele family clan Essentially, the `aumakua is an ancestor that has died and come back in a different form An `aumakua usually communicates with, helps, inspires and guides members of the family Note: A pueo, or owl may be the `aumakua for a particular family but it does not mean that all pueo are guardians for that family One particular pueo is an `aumakua for that family, providing that the `aumakua is properly taken care of through offerings and prayer `Aumakua serves as a guardian. Helps in times of trouble and gives inspiration and strength in times of need, sometimes comes in dreams Brought warnings of coming misfortune and deliverance from immediate danger. For example, in some families, when a pueo cries in a strange way, it is considered to be a warning of some sort `Aumakua could also punish for misdeed Illness – ie: if a person took something he shouldn’t have, his `aumakua could cause swelling and pain in his hand or a sore foot could be a result of going somewhere you wasn’t supposed to One way to bring certain retribution was to eat the physical form Accounts tell of people becoming violently ill or dying as a result Things like greed, jealousy and dishonesty could strain family relationships and bring about punishment from the `aumākua of one’s `aumakua. If some sort of misbehavior offended the `aumakua, it was up to the family to make amends It is through our `aumakua that we sustain a practical connection with our ancestors
  • The kanaka maoli also believed that many natural objects – geological formations, rocks, plants, and animals were kinolau or body forms of the gods. Each of the four major gods had more than one kinolau in which they dwelled simultaneously Such manifestations include human, fish and plant forms, as well as phenomenon such as lightning, hailstones, and rainbows In these visibly earthly manifestations, the gods became a part of day to day life for the kanaka maoli Kinolau of Kāne = bamboo Kū = `ulu and niu Lono = kukui, pua`a Kanaloa = he`e
  • Akua, you see speaks to potentiality. If you think about akua as a god alone you will miss the entire point of why akua exist. Akua are within us, to call upon them is to call upon them within us, so that the potential within us is brought forth. To recognize a particular akua is to recognize that potential within us. The deification of our ʻāina and the personification of the ʻāina into story form was utilized for the kanaka (human) to better understand their relationship to the environment and the universe. You have to think how misconstrued the Hawaiian belief system was made out to be when colonization was in full force.
  • More in depth in the accompanying article
  • 107 hoomana

    1. 1. HO`OMANA: Native Spirituality
    2. 2. MANA Mana • nvs. Supernatural or divine power, mana, miraculous power; a powerful nation, authority; to give mana to, to make powerful; to have mana, power, authority; authorization, privilege; miraculous, divinely powerful, spiritual; possessed of mana, power. Ho`omana • To place in authority, empower, authorize • To worship; religion, sect.
    3. 3. AKUA • God, goddess, supernatural spirit. • Occasionally used to mean supernatural quality or even a human who has supernatural powers. • Children of Kamehameha by Keopuolani were sometimes referred to as akua because of their high rank.
    4. 4. AKUA • 4 “major” gods – K ne: God of creationā – K : God of warū – Lono: God of peace, agriculture, fertility – Kanaloa: God of ocean
    5. 5. OTHER AKUA • Laka – Goddess of hula • Pele – Volcano goddess • Kapo – Goddess of sorcery • Ma iola – God of healingʻ • La amaomao – Goddess of windsʻ • Hina – Goddess of the moon • Occupational gods – K huluhulumanu (god worshipped by birdū catchers
    6. 6. `AUM KUAĀ • 1. nvt. Family or personal gods, deified ancestors who might assume the shape of sharks (all islands except Kaua i), owls (asʻ at M noa, O'ahu and Ka and Puna,ā ʻū Hawai i), hawks (Hawai i), elepaio, iwi,ʻ ʻ ʻ ʻ mudhens, octopuses, eels, mice, rats, dogs, caterpillars, rocks, cowries, clouds, or plants. A symbiotic relationship existed; mortals did not harm or eat aum kua (theyʻ ā fed sharks), and aum kua warned andʻ ā reprimanded mortals in dreams, visions, and calls. (Beckwith, 1970, pp. 124–43, 559; N n 38.) Fig.., a trustworthy person.ā ā
    7. 7. KINOLAU • According to the Hawaiian dictionary, kinolau are “many forms taken by a supernatural body” (Literally: many bodies) • It is believed that when the gods tangibly manifested themselves on earth they did so in the forms of kinolau
    8. 8. FINAL THOUGHTS ON AKUA • Traditionally speaking, the relationship that the kanaka maoli had with their akua was a part of their daily lives as shown through protocol, ritual and ceremony. • Cultural practitioners today have an intimate relationship with their akua, though not to the same degree as i ka w kahiko (ancient times).ā
    9. 9. AO • AO KUEWA/AO `AUANA – Spirits of the dead who were doomed to wander forever within specific geographic area • AO `AUMAKUA – The desired realm of the spirit ancestors • AO O MILU – Realm of Milu – Dark and endless night
    10. 10. If you have any questions, please ask them on the Discussion Board. Mahalo!

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