Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
104+mookuauhau
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

104+mookuauhau

487

Published on

Published in: Self Improvement
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
487
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. MO`OKŪ`AUHAU: GENEALOGY HWST 104
  • 2. WHY STUDY GENEALOGY? • • • • • To strengthen family ties To personalize history and geography To create a legacy for your descendants To learn research techniques To create history, not just study it
  • 3. Mo`okū`auhau • Mo`okū`auhau, or genealogy, is very important to the Hawaiian people • It is important to know where you come from • Genealogy determined rank of ali`i • You will find that most mo`olelo and ka`ao begin with some form of genealogy
  • 4. TIPS ON RESEARCHING YOUR OWN MO`OKŪ`AUHAU • Do interviews with your parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins in your family lines to research your family roots. • Find out at much as you. Some things you may want to ask include: – Birth and death dates and places, marriage dates and places and who the person married, children, etc. – Education, Occupation, Religion, Adoption, Military Service, Foreign Language(s) spoken, Immigration, Family Stories about this person.
  • 5. CREATING YOUR MO`OKŪ`AUHAU • Do not just use first names if at all possible. • Use given names rather than nicknames on your official genealogy chart. • When using names for women, use given last names (maiden names) rather than married names
  • 6. GENOGRAM SYMBOLS • A genogram is a graphic representation of a person’s mo`okū`auhau, or genealogy. It displays the interaction of generations within a family. – For example, males are represented by a square ; females by a circle . – For more on genogram symbols, visit the following website: http://www.genopro.com/genogram/symbols/
  • 7. KA MOʻOKŪʻAUHAU O KA ʻOHANA CHONG Chong Family Genealogy (Sample)
  • 8. Reginald Joseph Wailana Chong Evelyn Leimamo Apo Paternal Grandmother Paternal Grandfather Herbert Yamashita Paternal Grandfather Rachel Elaine Gapol Paternal Grandmother Vaughn W. Chong Uncle Rachelle Yamashita Auntie Reginald K. Chong Uncle Brandon Yamashita Uncle Miles K. Chong Uncle Scotty Yamashita Uncle Ryan Kauʻi Chong Father Rion Keakakaiuli Ichiro Chong Gabrielle Kamālamalamaonālani Yamashita Mother Callie Kapuahiwaikauika’iu Sayuri Chong Lainey Haliʻalaulani Kimiko Chong
  • 9. PATERNAL GRANDPARENTS • ʻO Reginald Joseph Wailana Chong ke kāne no Kailua, Oʻahu • ʻO Evelyn Leimamo Apo ka wahine no Pāʻia, Maui. • Noho pū lāua. Hānau ʻia mai ʻo Ryan Kauʻi Chong, he kāne.
  • 10. MATERNAL GRANDPARENTS • ʻO Herbert Yamashita ke kāne no ʻŌlaʻa, Hawaiʻi • ʻO Rachel Gapol ka wahine no ʻŌlaʻa, Hawaiʻi. • Noho pū lāua. Hānau ʻia mai ʻo Gabrielle Kamālamalamaonālani Yamashita, he wahine
  • 11. ʻO Ryan Kauʻi Chong ke kāne no Hilo, Hawaiʻi ʻO Gabrielle Kamālamalamaonālani Yamashita ka wahine no Keaʻau, Hawaiʻi. Noho pū lāua. Hānau ʻia mai ʻo Rion Ichiro Keakakaiuli Chong, he kāne. A hānau ʻia mai ʻo Callie Kapuahiwaikauikaʻiu Sayuri Chong a me Lainey Haliʻalaulani Kimiko Chong, he mau wāhine.

×