2.28.11 webinar

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2.28.11 webinar

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  • Step 3 Overview Part A and B
  • 3A Guide Questions
  • 3A Tutorial
  • 3A Tutorial
  • 3B Instructions
  • 3B Guide Questions
  • 3B Tutorial
  • 3B Tutorial
  • Step 4 Guide Questions
  • Step 4 Tutorial
  • 2.28.11 webinar

    1. 1. C2L Jam on Reflective Practice Webinar 2.28.11
    2. 2. Why Reflection? <ul><li>“ The function of reflection is to make meaning, to formulate the relationships and continuities among the elements of an experience, between that experience and other experiences, between that experience and the knowledge that one carries, and between that knowledge and the knowledge produced by thinkers other than oneself…. The creation of meaning out of experience is at the very heart of what it means to be human. It is what enables us to make sense of and attribute value to the events of our lives.” </li></ul><ul><li>Carol Rodgers </li></ul><ul><li>“ Defining Reflection: Another Look at John Dewey and Reflective Thinking,” </li></ul>
    3. 3. Reflection & Cognition <ul><li>“ Perhaps the most significant message [of the new cognitive research on learning] is the role of reflection in learning. Learning occurs, not necessarily as a result of the experience itself, but as a result of reflecting on the experience and testing it against further experience and the experience of others.” </li></ul><ul><li>Patricia K. Cross </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Is About Making Connections </li></ul>
    4. 7. Reflective Praxis <ul><li>Examining our practices to generate theory </li></ul><ul><li>Considering theory to strengthen our practices </li></ul>
    5. 8. Reflective Praxis <ul><li>Posting practice to our portfolios </li></ul><ul><li>Webinar </li></ul><ul><li>Examine portfolios; use theory to analyze & discuss </li></ul><ul><li>Implications for practice – reflecting in our portfolios </li></ul>
    6. 9. A Doorway into the Literature on Reflection <ul><li>Dimock, V., Martinez, D., & Burns, M. (2000, Winter). Learning is an Active and Reflective Process . TAP into Learning , 1-12. </li></ul><ul><li>Eynon, B. (2009). Introduction. In Transit, The LaGuardia Journal on Teaching and Learning , v-xvi. </li></ul><ul><li>Rodgers, C. (2002). “Defining Reflection: Another Look at John Dewey and Reflective Thinking.” Teachers College Record , 842-866. </li></ul><ul><li>Rodgers, C. (2002). “Seeing Student Learning: Teacher Change and the Role of Reflection.” Harvard Educational Review , 230-254. </li></ul>
    7. 10. Dewey’s Criteria for Reflection <ul><li>Carol Rogers has summarized Dewey’s criteria for effective reflection into these four statements: </li></ul><ul><li>A. Reflection as connection </li></ul><ul><li>B. Reflection as systematic and disciplined </li></ul><ul><li>C. Reflection as social pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>D. Reflection and personal growth </li></ul>
    8. 11. Reflection as Connection <ul><li>Reflection is a meaning-making process that moves a learner from one experience into the next with a deeper understanding of its relationship with and connections to other experiences and ideas. It is the thread that makes continuity of learning possible. </li></ul>
    9. 12. Exp Exp Exp Exp
    10. 13. Exp Exp Exp Exp Reflection
    11. 14. Exp Exp Exp Exp Reflection Reflection
    12. 15. Exp Exp Exp Exp Reflection Reflection Reflection
    13. 16. Exp Exp Exp Exp Reflection Reflection Reflection Prior Learning
    14. 17. Exp Exp Exp Exp Reflection Reflection Reflection Prior Learning Making Meaning Integration
    15. 18. Reflection as Systematic & Disciplined
    16. 19. Reflection as Social Pedagogy <ul><li>Reflection needs to happen in community, in interaction with others. </li></ul>“ The experience has to be formulated in order to be communicated. To formulate requires getting outsider of [the experience], seeing it as another would see it, considering what points of contact it has with the life of another, so that it may be got into such form as he can appreciate its meaning.” John Dewey, Democracy and Education
    17. 20. Reflection and Personal Growth <ul><li>Reflection requires attitudes that value the personal and intellectual growth of oneself and others </li></ul>
    18. 21. Dewey’s Criteria for Reflection <ul><li>Carol Rogers has summarized Dewey’s criteria for effective reflection into these four statements: </li></ul><ul><li>A. Reflection as connection </li></ul><ul><li>B. Reflection as systematic and disciplined </li></ul><ul><li>C. Reflection as social pedagogy </li></ul><ul><li>D. Reflection and personal growth </li></ul>
    19. 22. <ul><li>Your task in this step of the Online Jam is to visit each other’s Campus Portfolios to examine, learn from, and comment on each other’s reflective practices. As you do so, please consider and utilize Dewey’s criteria. </li></ul><ul><li>What do you observe about this practice? What connections does it help students make? What’s most interesting about it? </li></ul><ul><li>Based on what you know & what you see, what are the strengths of this practice? Can you identify & highlight some elements of the practice that make it particularly effective? What leads you to believe that it’s effective? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this practice demonstrate any of Dewey’s criteria, as outlined by Rodgers? Which one(s)? Do these criteria help us understand or highlight the strengths of the practice? Do they suggest ways it could be strengthened? </li></ul><ul><li>What are some similarities or differences between this practice and something you do in your class, or in your project? Does it confirm your thinking or push you to think in new ways? </li></ul>
    20. 23. Case Studies of Reflective Practice <ul><li>Randy Bass discussing Pace University & Three Rivers CC </li></ul><ul><li>Trent Batson discussing Tunxis CC </li></ul><ul><li>Judit Torok discussing Virginia Tech </li></ul><ul><li>C2L discussing C2L </li></ul>
    21. 24. Pace University Three Rivers CC Randy Bass
    22. 25. What make a reflective practice an effective practice? <ul><li>Reading campus portfolios: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What kinds of questions should we be asking each other (and ourselves) about effective reflection practices? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What should we be identifying as the possible portable elements of practices (e.g. iteration, sequencing, scaffolding, social feedback, etc.) </li></ul></ul>
    23. 26. Pace University: Single Course Writing Portfolio <ul><li>Reflective Blogs in LIT 132 and ENG 201 </li></ul><ul><li>Four Blog posts required as part of ePortfolio </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(3 “postwrites” and a final reflection) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Focus on accomplishments as a critical reader and writer, writing process, learning gains </li></ul>
    24. 27. Pace University: Single Course Writing Portfolio Iterative reflection on writing practice culminates in a final reflection
    25. 28. Pace University: Single Course Writing Portfolio Connections
    26. 29. Pace University: Single Course Writing Portfolio How do prompts lead to connections? What kind of scaffolds are necessary to facilitate the kinds of connections we are hoping to see?
    27. 30. Pace University: Single Course Writing Portfolio Faculty Reflection “ I think having students develop the ‘habit’ of reflecting on their writing and reading throughout the semester enables them to practices reflective thinking, and deepen their learning.” “ Certainly, reading these reflections enables me to appreciate students’ concerns and challenges, and often the authentic voice that comes through in the blogs is quite strong.”
    28. 31. Pace University: Single Course Writing Portfolio what makes effective practice? Intuitively, there seems to be a correlation between strong reflections and more effective essays…but there is need for further research. For example, how much does becoming more a reflective learner influence students to revise more carefully?
    29. 32. In search of effective practices of reflection… Reflection as professional development: iterative program-level design N101 N102 N201 N203 N205 <ul><li>Description of experience </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on goals & outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Self-evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Increasingly comparative </li></ul><ul><li>Social at all stages </li></ul>Three Rivers Community College
    30. 33. Three Rivers CC (Nursing) Foundational
    31. 34. Foundational Description of experience setting up comparison with other work “ Backward design” of reflective practice implies that faculty think forward and together: “All clinical faculty promote development of reflective skills.” Three Rivers CC (Nursing)
    32. 35. Three Rivers CC: Iterative design
    33. 36. Three Rivers CC: Making reflection “social” and public
    34. 37. Three Rivers CC: Making reflection “social” from the beginning Reflection as social pedagogy begins with entry level courses
    35. 38. Three Rivers CC: Questions that emerge from reading Questions: What are the markers of increasingly authentic voice in reflection? (Especially in light of program goals and outcomes)? What are the mechanisms whereby faculty get on the same page? This is an inspiring example, which is rooted in practice. Are there portable practices here that could work in other kinds of disciplinary development?
    36. 39. Response & Analysis of a Reflective Practice at Tunxis Trent Batson Connect to Learning Project
    37. 40. My Analysis <ul><li>What this instructor did to elicit reflective and integrative thinking: Reflection not revision </li></ul><ul><li>Re-casting of this practice: Recursion </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis: Importance of time to deep reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion: Using reflection as “field notes” to your self 11 weeks later: Reflection on Reflection. </li></ul>
    38. 41. Where does this fit in the C2L “Possible Prompts”? <ul><li>A. Reflection as connections. </li></ul><ul><li>B. Reflection as systematic and disciplined: Reflection is a systematic, rigorous, disciplined way of thinking, with its roots in scientific inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Use field notes (reflections) as a scientist would: a process of data collection, field notes, analysis over time. </li></ul>
    39. 42. Virginia Tech’s SERVE Living Community Judit Torok
    40. 43. Comments on Campus Practices <ul><li>What do you observe about this presentation? What kinds of connections does it seek to help students make? What’s most interesting to you about it? </li></ul><ul><li>Based on what you know and what you can see, what are the strengths of this practice? Can you identify and highlight some elements of the practice that you think make it particularly effective? What would lead you to believe that it’s effective? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this practice demonstrate any of Dewey’s criteria, as outlined by Rogers? Which one(s)? Do these criteria help us understand or highlight the strengths of the practice? Do they suggest ways it could be strengthened? </li></ul><ul><li>What are some of the similarities or differences between this practice and something you are doing on your campus, in your class, or in your project? Does it confirm your thinking, or push you to think in new ways? </li></ul>
    41. 44. Observations, Strengths, Connections <ul><li>Well structured, scaffolded prompts, clear instructions; </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection encourages synthesis. </li></ul><ul><li>Connections: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Students to community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students to each other </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students to course content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students to themselves as first year college students and service oriented individuals </li></ul></ul>SERVE “ These SERVE ePortfolios represent the Co-Curricular Engagement portfolio” “ SERVE community members are encouraged to be active through both service and reflection . In their portfolios, you will find detailed experiences of their engagement as well as reflective pieces synthesizing their journeys ” (VT ePortfolio page)
    42. 45. Comprehensive Reflection Assignment Comprehensive Reflection Assignment
    43. 46. Strengths & effective elements <ul><li>Final Reflection Assignment: detailed, well articulated, clear, completes a cycle </li></ul><ul><li>eP structure is conducive to reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Step One: upload everything on the eP - review, reflection (past) </li></ul><ul><li>Step Two - description of the comprehensive reflection points to course objectives, other specific assignments (present) </li></ul><ul><li>Summary – How has your understanding of definitions and theories discussed in class changed? Give concrete examples. </li></ul><ul><li>Step Three – Write a letter to your future self (future) </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt to think about the learning process </li></ul>
    44. 47. “ Final Exam Replacement” – ePortfolio Assembly, Comprehensive Reflection, and Letter to Self (200/1000 total points) <ul><li>Step II - Comprehensive Reflection (150 points) </li></ul><ul><li>Your comprehensive reflection entry will be the home page for the “Synthesis and Reflection” tab. This final paper should demonstrate your ability to reflect critically on the whole of the class (readings, discussions, projects, experiences ) and articulate how your views and understanding has progressed. This comprehensive paper is a synthesis of both the theoretical and practical constructs of reflection, dialogue, group process, service, and leadership . Look to the “course objectives” outlined in the syllabus as one possible checklist of tracking potential learning and reflecting on the course. More specifically, the paper should include exploration of some of the following questions: </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>What are some critical components of community building? </li></ul><ul><li>How h as your understanding of “the call to service,” “citizenship,” and/or “democracy” evolved over the course . Include relevant and updated pieces from your “My ‘why’” assignment </li></ul><ul><li>Provide concrete examples of particular experiences, discussions, or readings that illustrate areas of learning or personal growth </li></ul><ul><li>How has your service personally impacted you ? What did you learn about the social issues being addressed at your site? </li></ul><ul><li>How has the study of social change and the change lab activity s haped you ? How might you consider using some of these experiences/studies to help you in future pursuits? </li></ul><ul><li>Step III – Letter to Self (25 points) </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>It is the end of the semester, and you have just finished your comprehensive reflection. This is your last bit of work before you can close the book on this class and your first semester here at VT. Write a letter to your future self (the one who, presumably, will spend the winter break enjoying some much deserved relaxation. Catch this future self up on all you’ve accomplished and give him/her some direction into your favorite parts of your ePortfolio, some learning points / experiences / reflections you want to highlight . Then take a minute to give some direction on where you would like to go for your second semester here at VT. Is there some new project you would like to initiate to address some social issue or meet some student need? Is there someone you met this semester whom you need to get to know better or want to learn more from? Whatever it may be, big or small, take this opportunity to jump-start yourself into action. </li></ul>Reflect critically on the whole class (readings, discussions, projects, experiences) and articulate how your views and understanding has progressed. This paper is a synthesis of both theoretical and practical constructs of reflection, dialogue, group process, service, and leadership How has your understanding … evolved? How has… it impacted you? What did you learn? How has it…shaped you? Write a letter to your future self: catch yourself up on all you’ve accomplished… give yourself some direction into your favorite parts, some learning points and experiences, reflections you want to highlight.
    45. 48. Dewey’s criteria for Reflection <ul><li>Dewey's theory: Meaning making out of experience. Common, shared experiences: volunteering, community service, classroom, living experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Interaction and continuity. Students interact with their environment, with theory, with other people in their community and other students. Students make sense of the new experiences based on prior knowledge, their own experiences and other students experiences – through ePortfolio. </li></ul><ul><li>Educative experience. Broadens the field of experience (connecting service learning and classroom); leads to intelligent action (reinforced by final reflection). Direct the course of future experiences, envisioning possibilities; Step Three: Writing a letter to future self </li></ul><ul><li>Reflection as set of attitudes. Taking responsibility, recognizing real-life implication of student’s own thinking and actions; meaning doesn't stand alone. </li></ul>
    46. 49. Every single reflection forced you to question your thoughts and actions, and to find meaning to even to the most seemingly insignificant things. You gained knowledge about yourself , like your strengths, which you were previously clueless about. You have already started to learn and come up with ideas on your own . There were many great experiences you acquired, like community service projects and bonding with other SERVE members… but when you look back you will realize that the highlights during your time in this program were all those small steps you took in an effort to develop a well-rounded person . Next semester you will continue to learn… be sure to apply everything you have learned … to your leadership involvement in the Spring.
    47. 50. Similarities and Differences to our project <ul><li>Similarities to LaGuardia's Internship page </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internship page is connected to a course </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internship page is a scaffolded set of reflective prompts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on real-life student experiences while they are completing their internships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VT assignment connects student reflections on their changing identities as first year students to seeing themselves as active members of their community. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VT assignments pushes the reflection cycle deeper, encourages meaning-making out of their past experiences, current learning (in classroom and outside) and their visions for themselves in the future. </li></ul></ul>http://eportfolio.vt.edu/servegallery.html
    48. 51. Next Steps Instructions, Guide Questions & Tutorials
    49. 52. Collective Research & Analysis Tues., March 1 – Mon., March 7 Participants: at least 2 members from each team. More welcome. Part A. Review & Comment, in Digication Portfolios. Part B. Asynchronous Discussion Board Exchange. Next Steps Post-Jam Reflective Post to Campus Portfolio Mon-Fri, March 7-11 Participants: at least 1 portfolio post per team. More welcome. Team (as a team or as individuals) posts a reflection in your portfolios
    50. 53. <ul><li>Group A </li></ul><ul><li>Manhattanville </li></ul><ul><li>University of Delaware </li></ul><ul><li>Long Island University </li></ul><ul><li>Johnson & Wales </li></ul><ul><li>IUPUI </li></ul><ul><li>Tunxis CC. </li></ul><ul><li>Group B </li></ul><ul><li>Norwalk CC. </li></ul><ul><li>Pace University </li></ul><ul><li>Virginia Tech </li></ul><ul><li>Boston University Queensborough CC. </li></ul><ul><li>Group C. </li></ul><ul><li>St. John’s University </li></ul><ul><li>Rutgers University </li></ul><ul><li>LaGuardia CC </li></ul><ul><li>Salt Lake CC. </li></ul><ul><li>Lehman C. </li></ul><ul><li>Hunter C. </li></ul><ul><li>Group D. </li></ul><ul><li>Empire State C. </li></ul><ul><li>Three Rivers CC. </li></ul><ul><li>San Francisco State U. </li></ul><ul><li>NWCC </li></ul><ul><li>School of Professional Studies </li></ul>Groups for Portfolio Review
    51. 54. <ul><li>As you review and comment on specific campus practices, via the portfolio, please keep these questions in mind: </li></ul><ul><li>What do you observe about this practice? What kinds of connections does it seek to help students make? What’s most interesting to you about it? </li></ul><ul><li>Based on what you know and what you can see, what are the strengths of this practice? Can you identify and highlight some elements of the practice that you think make it particularly effective? What would lead you to believe that it is effective? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this practice demonstrate any of Dewey’s criteria, as outlined by Rogers? Which one(s)? Do these criteria help us understand or highlight the strengths of the practice? Do they suggest ways it could be strengthened? </li></ul><ul><li>What are some of the similarities or differences between this practice and something you are doing on your campus, in your class, or in your project? Does it confirm your thinking, or push you to think in new ways? </li></ul>Case Review & Commenting – Guide Questions
    52. 55. Engagement and Integrative Learning >> Student and Faculty Practice >> Reflection Practice On the ‘Reflection Practice’ page, click ‘ Show Comments and Tags ’ http://c2l.digication.com Case Review & Commenting – How to Comment
    53. 56. Engagement and Integrative Learning >> Student and Faculty Practice >> Reflection Practice <ul><li>What do you observe about this practice? What kinds of connections does it seek to help students make? What’s most interesting to you about it? </li></ul><ul><li>Based on what you know and what you can see, what are the strengths of this practice? Can you identify and highlight some elements of the practice that you think make it particularly effective? What would lead you to believe that it is effective? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this practice demonstrate any of Dewey’s criteria, as outlined by Rogers? Which one(s)? Do these criteria help us understand or highlight the strengths of the practice? Do they suggest ways it could be strengthened? </li></ul><ul><li>What are some of the similarities or differences between this practice and something you are doing on your campus, in your class, or in your project? Does it confirm your thinking, or push you to think in new ways? </li></ul>Case Review & Commenting – How to Comment
    54. 57. Next Steps: 3B – Asynchronous Discussion Board Exchange Participants report to the large group on one of the practices they reviewed and the patterns they observed. Give and take.
    55. 58. <ul><li>What was the most interesting thing you learned from looking at others practices?  What seemed most promising or intriguing?  Why? </li></ul><ul><li>What did the homework readings and the campus review reveal about the meaning of  effective reflective practice?  What patterns emerged for you? What did you observe, for example, in terms of variations of effective reflection according to context -- or the type of connection reflection helps make? </li></ul><ul><li>Using Dewey’s criteria (eg reflection as connection, or reflection as systemic and disciplined), what type of reflective practice seemed most common?  Least common?  Why might this be?   What does this suggest about the strengths and weaknesses of our practice?  About the strengths and weaknesses of Dewey’s 4 part framework? </li></ul><ul><li>How might you define reflection at this point?  Based on readings and the examples from the C2L Campus Portfolios, how is your definition of reflection changing? </li></ul><ul><li>What questions did these examples of effective practice raise for you? </li></ul>Discussion Board Exchange – Guide Questions
    56. 59. Log in to the Connections blog, then in the Connect to Learning main tab. Click ‘ Enter Forum Here ’. http://connections-community.org/c2l Discussion Board Exchange – Getting Started
    57. 60. Click ‘ C2L Spring 2011 ’ Then Click ‘ Reflection Forum ’ 1 2 Discussion Board Exchange – Getting Started
    58. 61. <ul><li>Post-Jam Reflective Post to Campus Portfolio </li></ul><ul><li>Mon-Fri, March 7-11 </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect on your learning. We ask at least one portfolio post per team, (more welcome) that answers the guide questions below. </li></ul><ul><li>What did you take away from this Online Jam about reflection? What are the 2-3 most important things you learned from the conversations and comments? </li></ul><ul><li>What are some of the crucial issues it raised for you? What did it make you want to learn more about? </li></ul><ul><li>How might you apply what you’ve learned to your campus plans for next year? What could you do differently in terms of your campus’ reflective practices? How could strengthening reflection fit into your project as a whole? </li></ul>Next Steps: 4 Guide Questions
    59. 62. Engagement and Integrative Learning >> Reflection http://c2l.digication.com Post your reflection under: Next Steps: 4 Guide Questions
    60. 63. Collaborative Learning <ul><li>Everyone is a learner. We’re all trying to figure it out. No one has all of the answers </li></ul><ul><li>The more energy and attention we put into this, the more we’ll learn. </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoy the community dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you for your thoughtful practice and commentary!!!! </li></ul>
    61. 64. Thank You!!!

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