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  • 1. intro/what/why\n2. overview of specific technologies\n3. general how tos\nI’ve tried to include info and encouragement for beginners as well as additional tips for those who are already using these tools.\nWe will stop for discussion periodically, but please feel free to ask along the way\n\n
  • In the beginning was the Internet...Arpanet, stuff for geeks. The potential for connection was there, but not everybody was doing it.\n
  • Around 1990, Tim Berners-Lee invented the hypertext standards (HTTP, HTML, URLs) of the worldwide web that made it easier to interact and connect with information through the Internet.\n
  • Email and older forums like Usenet as well as newer tools like the website farm Geocities made it easy to have discussions online and for anyone to have a personal website. However, you had to keep checking the boards and know some rudimentary HTML. \n
  • Over the last 10 years, the web has continued to evolve, with new technologies in the background providing the framework for new tools: blogs, wikis, dynamic websites, and more. We’ll talk about some of these background technologies in a few minutes.\n
  • There are lots of names for what the web has morphed into. A few years after the dot-com bubble burst, Tim O’Reilly coined the term and O’Reilly publishers held a Web 2.0 conference in 2005.\n
  • Another reason social media works as a term is that for some people it’s all about the social. For others, it’s all about the media and using the tools for personal benefits. I go for a blend of the two, but I don’t judge either extreme.\n
  • One thing that is deceptive about the term web 2.0 is that it sounds like a software release, but it’s not. This is one reason I’ve shifted to using the term social media. Others like to refer to the read-write web, since it is easier to publish as well as read. BTW, read write web is also the name of a very useful web 2.0 tech-focused website.\n
  • Web 2.0 is also not a fad. various web 2.0 tools/services have been going strong since mid-2000s. Popularity/use of some tools ebbs and flows as new ones arrive, but collectively they are not going away.\n
  • This is one reason why librarians cannot adopt an ostrich approach. But we’ll talk about more reasons why we should keep up with these developments later on.\n
  • Some of the changes we’ve already seen include...\n
  • Instead of emailing an author to comment on their website, there was no guarantee your comment would be read by anyone. With web 2.0, you can now comment instantly on lots of web content whether it be blogs, newspaper articles, photos, or facebook posts.\n
  • With all the new ease of connection, we could say that web 2.0 is (or is about) people. Many of its tools are prefaced with social: social bookmarking, social networking, and the all-encompassing social media.\n
  • One of the best things about web 2.0 is you don’t need deep technical knowledge to use it, but I will briefly mention a few of the backend tools that make it possible. You can use web 2.0 without knowing anything about how they work, but it’s helpful to recognize them when you hear about them.\n\nRSS is the backbone of web 2.0. It’s the protocol that enables blogs, twitter, and other web 2.0 sites to alert you when there is new content. Without RSS, web 2.0 would be hobbled.\n
  • AJAX is an acronym for Asynchronous Javascript and XML. It’s the technology that allows websites to update without reloading the whole page--think of zooming in on a Google Map, or getting new email in Gmail. AJAX makes dynamic websites possible.\n
  • APIs allow data from different programs to interact with each other. You might hear about Google’s or Netflix’s APIs. The map above was created using Google Maps and real estate listings from Craigslist. Tools created with APIs are often referred to as mashups.\n\n*origin of mashup, library examples*\n\nIf you want to know even more about “under the hood” web 2.0 technology, take a look at a post by the Other Librarian in the resources.\n
  • Moving along, many companies and institutions use social media to communicate with their customers. Many libraries are too. \n
  • ***\n
  • Getting started can be daunting if you haven’t explored web 2.0 before--and can be even if you have. Keeping up with all the new things could be a full time job.\n\n\n
  • Two important things to help it feel less daunting: 1. The great thing about many social media tools is that they are free. Technically. There’s no charge to use them, but there is the cost of your time, and that can be extensive. So think of them more like free as in free kittens--to keep them healthy and growing, you’ll have to feed and care for them regularly.\nNote that some, but not all, web 2.0 companies make money by charging for premium features--expanded storage, richer features, more users. But you and your libraries can use most of them without paying a dime.\n
  • 2. You don’t have to be this guy. Although knowledge of HTML can be helpful and it can’t hurt to know more advanced stuff, you can use any web 2.0 tool brilliantly without any of that. That’s part of the beauty of it. If you can sign up for an account online and use a Word-style editor, you’re good.\n
  • Impact on the legal system - juror use of Twitter, Facebook in family law, etc. ***more***\n
  • Interesting: .8% of lawyers don’t know if they have a personal presence in a social network\n
  • There are also legal specialty social networks, but they aren’t as popular. 1.4% are on Avvo, 2.1% on LawLink, 1.4% on Legal OnRamp, 1.2% on Legally Minded (which I haven’t even heard of.)\n
  • Not as many blogging or using Twitter. For more info, see the ABA Tech Survey\n
  • Even if you’re not interested in the social aspects, you can use web 2.0 tools to manage what I refer to as personal information flow--all that overwhelming information you want to keep track of. Instead of checking sites for new posts, news, or updates, you can subscribe to feeds and bring the new material to one site. The downside is that as information gets easier to manage, you may oversubscribe and be back where you started. But if you balance it carefully, you can make drinking from the hose less like this...\n
  • ...and more like this.\n
  • My colleague Michelle Pearse and other librarians who work on collection development use web 2.0 to have new titles pushed to them by publishers--some by RSS others via Twitter or even Facebook. Not all publishers offer this, but those that do provide a great convenience. Michelle says that RSS feeds helped tremendously with helping her feel like she could keep up. \n\nBook reviews from blogging law professors.\n\nALL-SIS webpage of Collection Development Resources on the Web specifies which resources include RSS feeds.\n\nShe also cited @law_book on Twitter--it uses an RSS feed of new books on Amazon tagged with law.\n\nLaw-acq-l ceasing in August\n
  • Web 2.0 tools also make it easy to find out what people are saying about your library, firm, and even you. It’s as simple as searching for the name of our library, including variations, in Google blog search and news and in TWitter and subscribing to the custom feeds.\n
  • Outreach: our patrons are out there finding and using information in new ways. They’re not going to wait for us. We should be out there with them, and we should also remind them that we’re still one of their best resources wherever they are. If we don’t do it, no one else will.\n\nPlus, we should know what some of these tools are when our patrons mention them.\n
  • That is not to say we should spread ourselves thin, which would be easy to do with all these different tools. Later on, we’ll talk about some tools and strategies for consolidating efforts and using social media as roads to lead users back to central locations.\n
  • In addition to these professional reasons for exploring web 2.0 is that it can be just plain fun. It’s a great way to get to know your colleagues. Because of Facebook and Twitter, I know which of my law librarian friends are runners, lolcat lovers, Tim Gunn afficionados, and sci-fi geeks.\n\nIt’s the people\n
  • It may sound frivolous, but sometimes the best way we learn is by playing. It you only ever use social media for serious, work-related purposes, you’re missing out on the whole point, which is the interaction. It’s okay to have fun with this stuff. For another thing: having some fun will help you better understand what users experience with these tools.\n\n***library interface stuff***\n
  • One more thing before we start to look at some specific tools: there are a lot of self-proclaimed experts and gurus out there making pronouncements about how to use social media. There are even librarians getting into the act claiming that if you don’t use X tool, you’re no longer relevant. \n\nDO NOT LISTEN TO THEM. Beware corporate advice. A couple months ago a librarian I know who had just started experimenting with Twitter went to a talk about using it by someone who is a full-time communications director. The full-time communications director said that if you can’t be on Twitter 24/7, you shouldn’t use it, so the librarian came back and shut down her account.\n\nI look at replies to our Twitter account about once a day and check the email address where the new follower notifications go to about once a week and that works for me. If our students need to reach us urgently, they now how to do it and they know it’s not by Twitter.\n
  • Everyone can be a social media specialist. \n\nSo take everything you hear about using these tools with a grain of salt. You are the expert on your community. Explore new things and make your own assessment of what will work for your patrons.\n
  • Any general questions before we move along to explore some things?\n
  • We’re going to start with RSS readers. I mentioned that we’ll talk about creating roads to lead your patrons to a central place. RSS readers are a way to bring the information you want to keep up with to a central location. \n\nInstead of going site by site to see if there is new material, RSS brings it to you. You check one place and if there’s nothing new, you haven’t wasted 15 minutes.\n\nThink of RSS like a newsstand, gathering the latest issues of all your favorite publications together.\n
  • How many people have an RSS reader account? How many of those use Google Reader? How many something else?\n\nTale of Bloglines, transition\n\nWhat to subscribe to?\n
  • Many institutions offer directories of RSS feeds: government, news, and libraries\n
  • Other web 2.0 services...photo sharing, videos, even podcasts. (iTunes basically uses RSS to feed new podcasts to your account. Anything with an RSS feed can be subscribed to with a reader. If you don’t see the icon and you’re not sure if it has a feed, copying and pasting the URL into your reader’s “add subscription” option. It may detect the feeds automatically.\n
  • \n
  • There are other options for subscribing to RSS--like many things 2.0, it depends on your preference: \n1. downloadable software readers\n2. in browser\n3. in Outlook/email client--I like to separate my rss feeds from my email, but if you only subscribe to a few feeds, this might work. You might also subscribe to most essential feeds--library search alert, your library’s blog--in email and do the rest in a reader.\n4. Some sites will also allow you to subscribe by email; they will send an email alert with new content.\n
  • How has or might RSS be useful in your job?\nHave you found RSS to help with information overload or to make it worse?\nHow does RSS compare with Lexis or Westlaw alerts?\n
  • Let’s shift from content collection to content creation. Blogging was one of the early popular successes of web 2.0. \n\nblogs - function sort of like reverse chronological journals - the most recent material at the top. And that’s about all they have in common\n
  • kinds of blogs - politics, crafts, photography, film, parenting, pets, food\n\none of my favorite food blogs to look at was started by some foodie librarians - recipicity.info\n\nBlogs for every interest and hobby. Lots of library blogs.\n
  • professional library blogs--institutional or organizational. Institutional ones tend to focus on issues of interest to their constituents--students, faculty, the public.\n\nI couldn’t find any firm library blogs on the open web, but some firm librarians blog independently (Canadian former firm librarian Connie Crosby) or are part of group blogs, like Greg Lambert blogging with lawyers at 3 Geeks and a Law and several contributors at Slaw.ca, the Canadian blog collective.\n
  • personal librarian blogs, both individual and collaborative. These are mainly librarians blogging about inside librarianship issues that wouldn’t interest our patrons. \n\nPersonal blogs tend to be more opinionated. Note Sarah’s warning that she uses salty language.\n
  • Looking for law library blogs? There were 219 law library or librarian blogs as of November 2010.\n
  • If you want to start a blog, there are many options...\nblogging platforms - blogger and wordpress most popular\nWP, my favorite - hosted or installed\nCMSes joomla and drupal also have blog modules\nyou probably don’t want to use LJ\n
  • *DEMO Wordpress*\n
  • what to do after you have a blog? you want it to be found by people interested in reading it. You could leave it to chance, but...\n\n
  • ...you could also add it to legal blog directories (blawg = blog+law). You might also email relevant listservs, post announcements around your building or library...\n
  • ...you should also feed it to other locations using the magic of RSS. In the back is our library’s students page, with a feed from the student category on our blog. We also have a full feed of all posts prominently displayed on our main page.\n
  • Once you have a blog set up, you can add other content to your blog with addons or widgets.\n\nGPLLA site, demo blogger ***\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n1. inform patrons about a service--interlibrary loan or research consultations\n2. cool new resource--or a refresher on an old favorite like Hein\n3. use the blog to introduce blog contributors or staff for a personal connection\n4. upgrading technology, construction, moving collection around, new hours\n5. what’s happening in the world? Royal wedding, Tyson tattoo, legal information advocacy\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n1. inform patrons about a service--interlibrary loan or research consultations\n2. cool new resource--or a refresher on an old favorite like Hein\n3. use the blog to introduce blog contributors or staff for a personal connection\n4. upgrading technology, construction, moving collection around, new hours\n5. what’s happening in the world? Royal wedding, Tyson tattoo, legal information advocacy\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n1. inform patrons about a service--interlibrary loan or research consultations\n2. cool new resource--or a refresher on an old favorite like Hein\n3. use the blog to introduce blog contributors or staff for a personal connection\n4. upgrading technology, construction, moving collection around, new hours\n5. what’s happening in the world? Royal wedding, Tyson tattoo, legal information advocacy\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n1. inform patrons about a service--interlibrary loan or research consultations\n2. cool new resource--or a refresher on an old favorite like Hein\n3. use the blog to introduce blog contributors or staff for a personal connection\n4. upgrading technology, construction, moving collection around, new hours\n5. what’s happening in the world? Royal wedding, Tyson tattoo, legal information advocacy\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n1. inform patrons about a service--interlibrary loan or research consultations\n2. cool new resource--or a refresher on an old favorite like Hein\n3. use the blog to introduce blog contributors or staff for a personal connection\n4. upgrading technology, construction, moving collection around, new hours\n5. what’s happening in the world? Royal wedding, Tyson tattoo, legal information advocacy\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n6. what do you love about your library’s location? what are your favorite local attractions or treats (very reusable with student populations)\n7. what’s your favorite study/work spot? Favorite GTD tactic? take a poll\n8. HarperCollins boycott, for one\n9. See something law or library-related on a trip? Or let your readers know about AALL.\n10. Last but not least...\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n6. what do you love about your library’s location? what are your favorite local attractions or treats (very reusable with student populations)\n7. what’s your favorite study/work spot? Favorite GTD tactic? take a poll\n8. HarperCollins boycott, for one\n9. See something law or library-related on a trip? Or let your readers know about AALL.\n10. Last but not least...\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n6. what do you love about your library’s location? what are your favorite local attractions or treats (very reusable with student populations)\n7. what’s your favorite study/work spot? Favorite GTD tactic? take a poll\n8. HarperCollins boycott, for one\n9. See something law or library-related on a trip? Or let your readers know about AALL.\n10. Last but not least...\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n6. what do you love about your library’s location? what are your favorite local attractions or treats (very reusable with student populations)\n7. what’s your favorite study/work spot? Favorite GTD tactic? take a poll\n8. HarperCollins boycott, for one\n9. See something law or library-related on a trip? Or let your readers know about AALL.\n10. Last but not least...\n
  • what to blog about (top ten list)\n6. what do you love about your library’s location? what are your favorite local attractions or treats (very reusable with student populations)\n7. what’s your favorite study/work spot? Favorite GTD tactic? take a poll\n8. HarperCollins boycott, for one\n9. See something law or library-related on a trip? Or let your readers know about AALL.\n10. Last but not least...\n
  • managing a blog\n\nblogging comments / spammers seeking reputable locations to link to their blogs - spammers are getting more clever, being complimentary and using keywords from the posts. But if you look at the links they include, it’s pretty easy to pick them out.\n\nThis is why many sites use captcha. Spam in different formats throughout web 2.0--bogus personal replies on Twitter, library page posts on Facebook. \n
  • blogging etiquette:\nhat tip\nnot reposting whole articles\nlinking contextual words rather than here.\n\n
  • What are everyone’s favorite law or library blogs? What is it you like about them?\nHow does or should tone differ between personal and professional blogs?\nDoes anyone participate on a blog? What do you blog about?\n\n\n
  • \n
  • Twitter is a short messaging service. Its creators wanted it to be compatible with text messaging, so content per message is limited to 140 characters, leaving 20 for mentioning names, hashtags, etc.\n\nYammer is an enterprise version of Twitter. You sign up with your work email to access an automatically private network restricted by email domain. (law.harvard.edu). We don’t get a ton of activity on ours, but if you are at a firm, I would definitely see if anyone’s there. If no one is, sign up and get notified when people join you.\n
  • Twitter is often derided for being pointless, people posting what they had for lunch, that they’re bored, etc. \nIt often takes awhile to get accustomed to Twitter. There’s a point of critical mass of followers/followees to experience it properly--to see it as a conversation and place that can be engaging. A lot of people give up before they get to this point. I’m not sure exactly what the critical number is, but I’d guess around 20.\n\nFailwhale - yet Twitter going strong since 2006 introduction. \n*demo*\n
  • Twitter - Library Innovation Lab mashed up circulation data in an experiment. A tweet for every check out.\n\nI briefly subscribed to the university wide version and it was too overwhelming.\n
  • One final thing: I sometimes see this question even in tech blogs. It’s a false dilemma. Maybe some people will use their RSS reader less and Twitter more to get news, but Twitter could not function without RSS to feed new posts together.\n
  • How does using Twitter compare to using an RSS reader?\nWhat sort of things might you use Yammer for?\nWhat should law libraries tweet about?\n\n\n
  • By which I mostly mean Flickr. \n\n\n
  • Library of Congress is the runaway success here. When they joined Flickr’s Commons project, \n\nFlickr intro\nsets - collections\nalbums\ntagging\ngeotagging\n
  • Flickr is also a great source of Creative Commons licensed photos for livening up blog posts, presentations. You can go to Flickr.com/creativecommons or use a site like compfight.com.\n
  • Who has used photosharing sites? Which ones? What did you like about it?\nDo you think there is a use in your library for photo sharing resources?\nDo you have concerns about the costs, privacy, and/or copyright issues involved in online photo sharing?\nWould you be willing to add CC licenses to your own photos?\n\n
  • major networks\nMySpace--still widely used by musicians\nFacebook--the most popular, people of all ages, students. How many of you are on Facebook?\n\nAnd how many on LinkedIn? \n\nA lot of people say they don’t know what LI is for or what the point is. It’s a network with a professional focus, a sort of web 2.0 rolodex--your contacts update their info. Whenever I need candidates to suggest for jobs or speaking, I give my LinkedIn contacts a look. There are also professional interest groups, groups for firms and university affiliates. \n\nFB-LI demo\n
  • FB-LI demo\n\nFacebook also has some built in tracking tools. Here’s a screenshot from before a mishap led to starting from scratch on our page a few weeks ago.\n\nThis Facebook chart also brings me to the next note: does anybody notice anything weird about the top cities my library’s fans are in?\n
  • I delete a lot odd stuff from our Facebook wall. Most of the posts are from people overseas or aspirational/cheerleading fans, or people trying to sell books or law-related stuff. And the crackpots. Most people who comment on our posts are also overseas. I remove the worst without guilt.\n\nThis is why I don’t spend much time on our Facebook account. Later I’ll show how I update Facebook and Twitter simultaneously.\n
  • Ning - DIY social network, various levels of privacy, RSS\nBig downside: last year went fee only $20/year for limited features, better features at $200. \nLaw Library Ning - several hundred members, has varied in activity. NELLCO sponsoring\nALLUNY and SFALL also used it for social space--now that AALLnet has integrated some social networking into the site, there may not be as much demand.\n\n\n
  • If you haven’t seen AALLnet recently, give it a look. They did an amazing job.\n\n*NING LAWLIBS DEMO*\n
  • There is another subset of specialty networks that may be of interest for personal/professional use - those for reading/books.\n\nYou can use them to track books you’re reading, want to read, own, and share reviews and comments with friends.\n\nLast year U of Chicago Law School joined GoodReads institutionally to promote fac scholarship, provide suggested reading lists. Let’s take a look. *GOODREADS DEMO*\n
  • What social networks are you on? \nAre you interested in following businesses/products/services on social networks? If you have done this, what did you like/dislike?\nUnlike most other web 2.0 services, there isn’t much data portability with social networks. Is that a problem? \nWhat other uses might we make of social networks, including the book focused ones?\n
  • \n
  • Back in the old days, we could bookmark sites and even organize them into folders, export/import between computers.\n\nWhich was great if you only used one computer and didn’t mind being limited to putting your bookmarks in only one folder.\n\n
  • The great thing about online, social bookmarking is that you can access your bookmarks from anywhere. You can also make them miscellaneous and add any kind of tags and notes them for easier finding.\n\nLike other 2.0 services, you can make your entire account or selected tags private. Mine: Babybaker, birthday presents, embarrassing pop culture interests. Not that I have any, of course.\n
  • What makes them social is that you can share them with people who can subscribe to rss for your entire feed or select tags.\n\nMy colleague Terri, a Villanova law alum, uses delicious to bookmark items of interest to LLM students she’s working with, who then subscribe to the tags student5 or student14. This strategy might also work with RSS-savvy attorneys\n\nOther law libraries have accounts on social bookmarking sites to share new legal resources or filter items to other sites like their blogs.\n
  • In 2009 our Special Collections department began an experiment with SB site Diigo, which has some shared website annotation features, to see if they could get visiting researchers to add information to finding aids as they used materials.\n\nIt turned out the sort of researchers they get aren’t tech savvy and the project never took off, but it was still a good learning experience.\n\n*DEMO DIIGO*\n
  • Who uses social bookmarking? Does anyone use services besides Delicious or Diigo?\nHas anyone transferred bookmarks between services?\nWhat other uses can you think of for social bookmarking? (One idea: blog widget, research guides--a libguide rss feed)\n
  • Wikis are easily editable websites: you don’t need to wait for a webmaster or someone who knows html, which makes them great for groups and organizations. \nMost have simplified syntax (caveat: sometimes nearly as tricky as html), but increasingly they use Word-style editors.\nWiki = Hawaiian for quick.\nMost famous, of course, Wikipedia.\n
  • wiki platforms - lots of choices. Most popular pbworks or media wiki. Some can be used online, others installed on your own server, like HLS Library’s.\n\nPBwiki morphed into additional services, popular for educational support\n
  • HLSL wiki screenshot ***\n\n*DEMO PBWORKS*\n
  • a change notification email from pbworks\n
  • Google Docs is similar to a wiki in that it is a collaborative editing tool, but it tends to be aimed more towards a single document than a website--it has some other bells and whistles.\n\nIf you’re not comfortable with Google having all your stuff, Zoho.com is an alternative. All my coworkers and collaborators have been assimilated by Google, so I am too.\n\n*DEMO G-DOCS*\n
  • Has your attitude about using Wikipedia for research changed over time?\nHave you ever edited Wikipedia or another wiki? How does it feel to edit in this fashion?\n\nCan you think of situations in the past that Google docs might have made life easier?\nHow do you feel about storing documents online with Google?\nHow does Google Docs compare with a service like Dropbox?\n\n
  • Google Wave: kind of a hybrid of idealized email and wikis--multiple users could edit and view edits happening live including editing each other’s material. You could add images and polls. Fantastic tool for planning and organizing. Rich Leiter uses it for planning Law Librarian Conversations radio. \n\nUnfortunately, Google botched its rollout making it too exclusive. Like Twitter, a lot of people missed the point because they didn’t have a critical mass of contacts on it, so it flatlined. It’s too bad, but something you have to be ready for.\n
  • Is gaming--especially with mobile devices--web 2.0/social media or something new altogether? I vote for grey area.\n\nLaw libraries are usually behind other libraries on tech, so there isn’t much info about the impact of games, but I’m going to mention a few and low commitment/energy ways to reach users.\n\n
  • FourSquare may be the most well known. When you are at a location--restaurant, convention center, sporting event, library--you pull up the mobile app which senses where you are with GPS and then you check off where you are. \n
  • There are a couple quick things you can do for your library on Foursquare: \nfirst is claim or create a place or venue for your library--add your contact info, website, and tag it. You’ll get some interesting stats. You can also note which users are employees.\n
  • You can also add tips about your library--collections, where to eat, etc. I just put one up about a new exhibit our HSC department has put up. Rotate them every couple months.\n\nWe’ve also run contests with bookshop gift card prizes for the mayor and the first new LLM and JD students to check in ten times.\n\nExplore adding tips to other locations in the area\n
  • Here’s what the public facing venue page looks like.\n\nIt’s hard to say where Foursquare is going since Facebook has added check in capabilities, but we’re watching.\n\nHarvard university tips/badge\n
  • More “check in apps” for going out, couch potatoes, readers.\n\nBadges for checking into action movies, with a crowd, reading four nights in a row, watching Freedom Ride.\n\nNot sure where it’s leading, or if it’s worth our time yet.\n
  • Planning is an important first step. \nIt will help keep you from feeling too overwhelmed or getting too carried away and trying everything at once.\nIt will help you be consistent.\nIt will help you create goals that you can aspire to and assess your efforts.\nIt will also help you be more efficient--this might be most important given the cost in time.\n
  • As you get started for yourself or your library, think of a handle that you can use across many sites. It might be fullname or first initial-lastname. I use my initials/birthday and hlslibrary. This way people who know you in one can find you in others. Not sure if it’s available? Use namecheckr. I also use namecheckr periodically to make sure I’ve claimed my handle on sites even if I don’t plan on using them.\n\nFor your library, you might want to set up a separate email (gmail) account for handling social media. And make sure more than one person has the login info for the sysadmin gets hit by a bus scenario. \n\nMake sure your library accounts have pictures and profile blurbs--another thing you may want to keep consistent from site to site.\n
  • Privacy settings--esp on social networking sites.\n\nFor personal, lock everything down as much as possible to friends only.\n\nFor library account, be as open as possible if you are at a school or county.\n\nBe vigilant - changing TOS.\n
  • Another valuable part of planning is finding a team, whether it be formal or informal.\n\nThe essential reason to have a team is to prevent burnout. Novalawcity v. weekly blogging. Different perspectives. New blood (Carli).\n\nSome people might love some tools and hate others. Or want to try something they don’t do in their normal job. Maybe you’ll have reference librarians working on soc bookmarking and cataloguers working on photo sharing.\n
  • To get the most out of our efforts, recycle. \n\nQuestion: are all of your patrons reading all of your publications/venues? Chances are, they won’t notice if an item from a newsletter is duplicated in your blog and then tweeted and sent to Facebook. And 3Ls probably won’t remember \n\nRecycling is a great way to get more mileage out of your efforts for less work.\n
  • You can also remix. Widgetize blogs and research guides. Stream your feeds where they’ll be seen. You can also mash up new creatures. This is the activity stream from Henderson Valley Eggs, a “themed information collective”/group blog. We each blog at our own sites and stream posts to HVE by tagging them with those letters. The sidebar is a stream of content from other sites--mostly social bookmarking but sometimes items from readers or twitter. You can subscribe separately from the main site. The HLS LIL has a similar feature. \n\nIt helps to have a great webmaster, but creations like this only get easier to make.\n
  • Friendfeed is a social media aggregator. You set it up and it draws automatically from all your other web 2.0 sites--photos, tweets, youtube, and more. It’s a little scary. There are communities there too--LSW.\n
  • Keeping stats to assess impact:\nFor example, when I was at Nova Southeastern University Law Library, I turned our blog posts into a quick newsletter every week or two and sent it out to our Townhall email list, and every Friday our blog stats spiked as a result.\n\nBuilt-in stats tracking tools at some sites are a start, but remember to record some basic info periodically about your social media accounts--number of followers/fans and so forth. I wish I had done that when we started our accounts. If you have a blog, see if it has a built-in hit tracking feature you can activate and if it doesn’t, check out sitemeter or statcounter to add one. Set up account/generate code to add in a hidden widget.\n
  • The more you can automate, the less time social media will take. My preferred tool at the moment is Hootsuite. Cotweet is a similar service I haven’t explored but may. Hootsuite used to allow team accounts for free, but they stopped doing it. ($5/month premium, but $15/month for each additional team member--too much)\n\n*DEMO HOOTSUITE*\n\n\n
  • Hootsuite also allows you to track the number of hits on links in your tweets, which can be useful for assessment.\n
  • I’ve begun using bit.ly instead. It’s cumbersome to use more than one service, but useful for additional features and better stats breakdowns.\n
  • As you start exploring web 2.0 tools, it’s useful to play Jane Goodall and study the community at the tool you’re interested in trying. Observe other institutions, read best practices (with grain of salt). Best way is to dive in with a personal account for a few weeks. You need time to study mores, etiquette, lingo, and ambience so you don’t make newbie mistakes.\n\nThere’s a big crowd of law librarians who can be found at nearly any social media site, so you will not be alone. \n
  • Another reason to study and observe is to try to avoid the Creepy Treehouse effect, especially if planning to make a presence somewhere students congregate. This is another reason I don’t stress about the lack of uptake on Facebook by our students.\n\nCreepy Treehouse is a term used in educational technology to describe:\n“institutional use of a technology/tool that emulates or mimics pre-existing technologies or tools that may already be in use by the learners. . . .Though such systems may be seen as innovative or problem-solving. . .they may repulse some users who see them as infringement on the sanctity of their peer groups.” (Jared Stein, Director of Instructional Design Services, Utah Valley University)\n\nIt’s a good rule of thumb not to repulse your users!\n
  • Because library \n\nThe past two summer, the AALL Computing Services SIS offered the Web 2.0 Challenge, an online course geared specifically for law librarians to learn about web 2.0 tools. We are planning to produce an online only edition in the near future, but until then you can still access the materials from the previous challenges--the only aspect you will miss are the small group discussions.\n\n5 Weeks, 23 Things\n
  • Once you’re using a social media tool, be prepared to engage the unexpected. Remember that web 2.0 is about interaction, connecting with people.\n\nLast year we got a question about the condoms that the Law Students for Reproductive Justice had put in the bathrooms. I wasn’t sure whether to reply, but after some deliberation, I replied that they were likely only there for a limited time and we would stick to providing free pencils and earplugs. (Situations like these demonstrate the usefulness of having a team--they can help you vet responding to the surprising.)\n
  • Once you get to know a few web 2.0 tools, it will keep you limber and you’ll be more comfortable exploring new ones. \n\nAdditional tools I’m keeping an eye on: QR quotes, mobile tech, tablets.\n\nWith the AALLnet site as just one example, social media features are popping up all over the web. Many news sites show you boxes indicating which of your friends have shared their articles on Facebook. \n\nAs web 2.0 features become commonplace, users expect to be able to interact with websites, including library sites and services. We can better anticipate the future if we’re keeping up with the present. \n
  • Before we finish, some final questions:\nWhich web 2.0 tools are you excited about exploring further? What tools do you think might be most successful at your type of library?\nAre there any web 2.0 tools we haven’t discussed that you’re curious about or already love?\nHow would you demonstrate the potential usefulness of a web 2.0 tool in order to achieve buy-in at work?\nWhat challenges do you think there might be in successfully implementing new tools?\n\n
  • Thank you for listening and thank you once again for inviting me to Philly!\n

Gplla1 Gplla1 Presentation Transcript

  • Rocky Statue by @Josh Self on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licenseSocial Media for Law Librarians: Meg Kribble Going the Distance June 3, 2011 | GPLLA Institute
  • Lanet-vi programThe Internet
  • Thanks, Tim! View slide
  • Usenet! Geocities! View slide
  • Evolution
  • Web 2.0? Social Media? Read-Write Web?
  • Social…………………………………Media
  • What it’s not
  • Gruene Croc by @loop_oh on FlickrNot like Crocs
  • Please I’ve Had Enough by @MJIphotoKeeping up
  • Ch-ch-changes
  • Talk Back Station by @leff on Flickr
  • Web 2.0 is people
  • RSS: Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary
  • Amphora: Ajax with the body of AchillesAJAX: Asynchronous Javascript and XML
  • http://www.housingmaps.comAPIs: Application Programming Interfaces
  • Two Ways by @noluck on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND licenseTwo way street
  • Social Media and the Workplace
  • Boston Marathon Starting Line by @Jim Plumb on FlickrGetting started
  • IMG_6451.JPG by @mak506 on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licenseFree—sort of
  • This Guy for President by @dogseat on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licenseNo nerdship required
  • Judge using his gavel by @IXQUICK on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licenseSocial media and the law
  • 17.3% firms with presence in an online social network 55.5%lawyers with presence in an online social network
  • 67.5%lawyers on Facebook 83%lawyers on LinkedIn
  • 17.1% career development 5.9% case investigation 41.5% client development 75.8% professional networking 62.1% socializingLawyers’ reasons for social networking
  • The Best Water is in the Hose @CaptPiper on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licensePersonal information flow
  • Water by @druid labs on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licensePersonal information flow
  • Library work
  • Restroom sign by @mandolux on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND licenseReputation management
  • Pon and Zi by Jeff Thomas aka Azuzephre http://www.azuzephre.netOutreach
  • Model of Rome during the Fourth Century CE by Italo Gismondi (ArtStor)All roads lead to Rome
  • Fun Photo by @t. magnum on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA license Slide by Deobrah Schander Georgia State University Law Library
  • Guitar Heroes by Rochelle Hartman Remix by Cable FlamePlay hard
  • If You Meet the Buddha, Kill Him by @laird! on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND license
  • Mars Rover | computer-generated image by NASAExploring Web 2.0 Tools
  • Newstand by @Benben on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licenseRSS: your newsstand
  • RSS Readers
  • RSS Feed Directories
  • More RSS sources
  • Google Reader demo
  • Email_subscribe by @derrickkwa CC:BY licenseOther subscription options
  • RSS Icons by Matt Forsythe http://comingupforair.net/2008/01/rss-icons/RSS discussion
  • Blogging
  • Float Away Scarf by @kpwerker on Flickr I am a librarian by @cindiann on Flickr yellow by @darkmatter on Flickr CC:BY-SA license CC:BY-NC-ND license CC:BY-NC-ND license La flor de mi secreta by @Felix42 on Flickr Small cheese olives by Scott Matheson CC:BY-NC-SA license at recipicity.info
  • CS-SIS Law Library Blog Directory
  • Popular platforms
  • Find it Fast Yellow Pages by @Thomas Hawk on Flickr CC:BY-NC licenseGet found
  • Crane Gears by @tallkev on Flickr CC:BY licenseGadgets, widgets, & add-ons
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging1. Library services
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 1. Library services2. New/notable resources
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 1. Library services2. New/notable resources 3. Introduce yourselves
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 1. Library services2. New/notable resources 3. Introduce yourselves 4. Library news
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 1. Library services 2. New/notable resources 3. Introduce yourselves 4. Library news5. Legal angle on current events
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 6. Local flavor
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 6. Local flavor7. Pose a question
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 6. Local flavor 7. Pose a question8. Issues in libraryland
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 6. Local flavor 7. Pose a question8. Issues in libraryland 9. Travel
  • Top 10 Ideas for Blogging 6. Local flavor 7. Pose a question8. Issues in libraryland 9. Travel 10. Make a list
  • Spam, egg, spam, spam, bacon, and spam
  • Blogging etiquette
  • RSS Icons by Matt Forsythe http://comingupforair.net/2008/01/rss-icons/Blogging discussion
  • to view by @remediate.this on Flickr CC:BY-NC licenseMicroblogging
  • Hattfield-McCoy Feud Historic Sign by @jimmywayne on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND license“Will Twitter kill RSS?”
  • RSS Icons by Matt Forsythe http://comingupforair.net/2008/01/rss-icons/Microblogging discussion
  • Frances goes to Coney Island by @annie bee on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND licensePhoto sharing
  • 3100 pictures 392,000 photostream views650,000 individual photo views 1.1 million total views 420 comments 1,200 photos favorited ...in a week. Sylvia Sweets Tea Room Library of Congress on Flickr Library of Congress on Flickr
  • Share, remix, reuse–legally
  • RSS Icons by Matt Forsythe http://comingupforair.net/2008/01/rss-icons/Photosharing discussion
  • Social Networking
  • Facebook tools
  • Facebook page spam
  • The DIY social network
  • AALLnet 2.0
  • All about reading
  • RSS Icons by Matt Forsythe http://comingupforair.net/2008/01/rss-icons/Social networking discussion
  • Marcadores de Quinta-Comprinhas by @HappyBatatinha on Flickr CC:BY licenseSocial Bookmarking
  • Old School
  • New School
  • That’s delicious
  • Diigo-ing special collections
  • RSS Icons by Matt Forsythe http://comingupforair.net/2008/01/rss-icons/Social bookmarking discussion
  • Wikis in Plain English
  • Popular wiki platforms
  • HLSL wiki
  • Change notifications
  • Collaborative editing
  • RSS Icons by Matt Forsythe http://comingupforair.net/2008/01/rss-icons/Wikis and Google Docs discussion
  • Wave flatlines
  • In the Law Library Castle! by @mak506 on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licenseGaming
  • Foursquare
  • Claim your place
  • Tips encouraged
  • Your venue
  • Checking in
  • Plan of Chicago, 1909 by Daniel BurnhamPlanning
  • Vintage Busby @cosmicautumn on Flickr CC:BY licenseBe consistent; be safe
  • another lock with green by @mak506 on Flickr“Keep it secret; keep it safe” –Gandalf
  • Blue Angels by John Ross, FAA Sun ‘n Fun 2011Finding your team
  • Rock & Recycle Signi by @Bukowsky18 on Flickr CC:BY-NC-SA licenseReuse - Recycle
  • Activity stream at http://www.hendersonvalleyeggs.com
  • Aggregating your life
  • Stats
  • Automation
  • More stats
  • Bit.ly
  • Gorillas! Volcanos National Park, Rwanda by @extremeboh on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND license Observe
  • old treehouse by @tompp on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND licenseCreepy treehouse
  • http://www.cssis.org/w2c2009
  • Expect the unexpected
  • Back to the Future by @darkmatter on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND licenseThe future’s so bright…
  • RSS Icons by Matt Forsythe http://comingupforair.net/2008/01/rss-icons/Social media @ your library
  • Griffin by @minwoo on Flickr CC:BY-NC-ND license Thank youmkribble@law.harvard.edu | http://www.slideshare.net/mak506