kajian tindakan-cooperative learning

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kajian tindakan-cooperative learning

  1. 1.  <br />KPR4063 (B)KAJIAN TINDAKAN DALAM PENDIDIKAN <br />Effects of Collaborative Action Research on the Knowledge of Five Canadian<br />Teacher-Researchers.(teachers learning from other teachers) Elementary School<br />Prepared For: Prof Madya Dr. Abdul LatifBin.HajiGapor<br />Prepared By:<br />JamnahBintiIshak L20111006510<br />MaizatulAkmarBtMohdSukeri L20111006536<br />MarzilpahBinti Abdul Hamid L20111006492<br />Farina BintiPauzan L20111006498<br />
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION<br /><ul><li>They wanted to know whether studying peers helped teachers conduct inquiries into their own practice.
  3. 3. This research focused on action research helps teachers improve their individual practice in several ways.
  4. 4. The second purpose for focusing on action research is that it contributes to knowledge about teaching by drawing on teachers' experience to identify questions neglected by researchers and by enriching the interpretation of findings with the tacit knowledge of teachers</li></li></ul><li>the project focused on student evaluation because a district needs assessment had identified evaluation as a top in-service training priority for teachers who were using cooperative learning methods (hereafter CL).<br />The purpose of Phase 2 was for each teacher-researcher to construct her own interpretation of the Phase 1 findings and to use the findings and the inquiry process that generated them to strengthen her classroom practice.<br />
  5. 5. DESIGN<br />Five teachers are selected who had shown an interest in action research, cooperative learning, and student assessment. <br />All teachers were female and had been using CL for at least 2 years. The officer selected teachers who represented the four geographic areas of the district and a range of grades: grades 1-2 (the primary division), grade 6 (two teachers who worked together closely in the junior division in the same school), grade 7 (intermediate division), and grade 12 (senior division). <br />These teachers (hereafter the teacher-researchers) met with the three authors who focused their teaching, research, and field development activities on CL, two principals (from two of the schools of the teacher-researchers) for whom CL was their top school priority, and the district curriculum consultant responsible for CL in-service training.<br />The teacher-researchers selected teachers known to them (through district in-service sessions, district curriculum documents, newsletter reports, and personal contacts) as successful users of CL techniques.<br />
  6. 6. These teachers (hereafter the teacher-researchers) met with the three authors who focused their teaching, research, and field development activities on CL, two principals (from two of the schools of the teacher-researchers) for whom CL was their top school priority, and the district curriculum consultant responsible for CL in-service training.<br />The teacher-researchers selected teachers known to them (through district in-service sessions, district curriculum documents, newsletter reports, and personal contacts) as successful users of CL techniques.<br />
  7. 7. DATA COLLECTING<br />Interview<br />Teacher plans and reflections<br />Student reflective journal entries<br />Student surveys<br />Student interviews<br />Observations of students<br />Achievement test scores.<br />Observation of team deliberations.<br />
  8. 8. analysis<br />Categories for coding the transcripts were created.<br />The transcripts and codes were entered into text-analysis software which sorted the data into the categories of the coding scheme.  <br />Descriptive cross-case summaries were created for each coding category.<br />
  9. 9. The qualitative data were interpreted using analytic induction (scanning the data for categories and relationships among them), constant comparison (checking responses against other data for the same case), and triangulation of data sources.<br />
  10. 10. RESULT (Phase 1)<br />The exemplary teachers were less confident about student evaluation than about other aspects of their teaching.<br />The potential knowledge of the exemplary teacher group exceeded the private knowledge of each individual.<br />
  11. 11. 3. The exemplary teachers wanted to learn more about evaluation methods, but few mechanisms for doing so were available for them.<br />
  12. 12. RESULT (Phase 2)<br />The teacher-researcher used the strategies reported to them as a basis for creating new methods that they though would be more effective.<br />The exemplary teachers used brainstorming to elicit student input.<br />
  13. 13. TAKING ACTION<br />Teacher-researchers assemble a four step procedure for teaching students how to evaluate their work.<br />Teacher-researcher’s creating conditions for professional learning.<br />
  14. 14. 3. Analyzing the practices of exemplary teachers enabled the teacher-researchers to recognize deficiencies.<br />4.Provided teacher-researchers with personal practical knowledge.<br />
  15. 15. SUMMARY<br />Action research methods develop in this study provide greater opportunity than other methods for the enhancement of teacher efficacy. <br />Teacher’s expectation about their professional abilities have generative power. Action research processes are more likely to contribute to teacher’s expertise if the processes build confidence as they simultaneously build knowledge and skill.<br />
  16. 16. THANK YOU<br />

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