Asian Drama: Discovering and Unleashing the Mobile Services Asia, Africa, Australasia Regional Conference 26-28 August 200...
Agenda <ul><li>The Telecoms Universe </li></ul><ul><li>Context </li></ul><ul><li>Target Policy Mix </li></ul><ul><li>And t...
The Telecoms Universe THE FOCUS OF THIS PRESENTATION:  UNIVERSAL SERVICE THRU TELECOMS  PRIVATIZATION, LIBERALIZATION,  AN...
Context
Target Policy Mix <ul><li>The Issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In the early 1950s and 1960s, most countries were confronted wi...
And the Experts Say <ul><li>The experts from the World Bank and other international lending institutions also promoted est...
The Grand Experiment <ul><li>PRIVATIZATION </li></ul><ul><li>It was up to each national administration to implement the va...
Research Approach <ul><li>PURPOSE </li></ul><ul><li>In the context of building a conceptual model that has a moderate degr...
Findings <ul><li>Reforms have dramatically transformed the telecommunications sector in several countries.  </li></ul><ul>...
Lessons Learned: India <ul><li>Privatization and competition had a large positive impact on telecommunications performance...
Lessons Learned: China <ul><li>China did not allow any privatization, which should lead one to investigate further the cou...
Overall Conclusions/Theoretical Findings: All Roads Lead To Rome <ul><li>To translate the preceding observations into poli...
Take Your Pick <ul><li>India and China –these two countries have very different governments and policies, leading to diffe...
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Asian Drama V2

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Asian Drama V2

  1. 1. Asian Drama: Discovering and Unleashing the Mobile Services Asia, Africa, Australasia Regional Conference 26-28 August 2007 Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia International Telecommunications Society (ITS) Dr. Amit K. Maitra Weatherhead School of Management Case Western Reserve University
  2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>The Telecoms Universe </li></ul><ul><li>Context </li></ul><ul><li>Target Policy Mix </li></ul><ul><li>And the Experts Say </li></ul><ul><li>The Grand Experiments </li></ul><ul><li>Research Approach </li></ul><ul><li>Findings </li></ul><ul><li>Lessons Learned </li></ul><ul><ul><li>India </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>China </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Overall Conclusions/Theoretical Findings: All Roads Lead to Rome </li></ul><ul><li>Take Your Pick </li></ul>
  3. 3. The Telecoms Universe THE FOCUS OF THIS PRESENTATION: UNIVERSAL SERVICE THRU TELECOMS PRIVATIZATION, LIBERALIZATION, AND REGULATORY REFORMS IN: CHINA and INDIA
  4. 4. Context
  5. 5. Target Policy Mix <ul><li>The Issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In the early 1950s and 1960s, most countries were confronted with three challenges: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rapid technological change; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Abysmal performance of state-owned telecom providers [1] ; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lack of adequate financial resources to deploy and integrate new technologies that could offer better and expanded services to the customers. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[1] By the 1980s, it was evident that nationalized monopoly telecommunications firms in developing countries could not provide telecom services. Potential customers faced long waiting periods before getting connected to the network. A 1992 study by The World Bank indicated that many large firms bypassed the monopoly provider by building their own networks. Refer to Wellenius et al.., “ Telecommunications: World Bank Experience and Strategy ,” World Bank Discussion Paper 192. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Policy Choices </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Privatization of the monopoly service provider; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduction of competition; [2] The experts promoted competition to create the right incentives for superior economic performance. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creation of independent regulatory agencies [3] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>[2] The experts promoted competition to create the right incentives for superior economic performance. </li></ul><ul><li>[3] They also suggested the creation of independent regulatory authorities that “supervise” deregulation by simulating the effects of competition in a way that generates the right level of market competition. </li></ul>
  6. 6. And the Experts Say <ul><li>The experts from the World Bank and other international lending institutions also promoted establishment of independent regulatory authorities that could oversee competition to create the right incentives for superior economic performance. They wanted the reforms to proceed in the following order: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Create independent regulatory agencies </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Introduce competition </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Privatize the state-owned monopoly provider. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. The Grand Experiment <ul><li>PRIVATIZATION </li></ul><ul><li>It was up to each national administration to implement the various components in as many different ways and as extensively as they could. </li></ul><ul><li>Initially, government often retained partial ownership of the incumbent. </li></ul><ul><li>REGULATION </li></ul><ul><li>Regulation also took many forms, with its details impacting the sector performance and the incumbent’s ability to exercise market power. </li></ul><ul><li>COMPETITION </li></ul><ul><li>In a few instances, government also allowed the newly privatized firm a temporary monopoly by barring competition to entice investors. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Research Approach <ul><li>PURPOSE </li></ul><ul><li>In the context of building a conceptual model that has a moderate degree of generality, it is important to study as many countries as possible that made different responses to telecoms restructuring, including </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Countries that have emphasized minimizing unemployment; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Countries that have responded to international organizational pressures; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Countries that were primarily seeking outside capital. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>IMMEDIATE OBJECTIVE </li></ul><ul><li>Review and analyze only a select few countries, which, until recently, </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preferred monopolies involving authoritarian and centralized decision making procedures, but then suddenly caught a glimpse of the potential for rapid gain through telecommunications privatization and liberalization efforts and began making plans for entry into market based economy. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Viewed privatization as a unique opportunity to increase revenues.[1] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>RESEARCH QUESTIONS </li></ul><ul><li>How the interests and values of private actors create institutional pressures that affect the nature of privatization decisions; </li></ul><ul><li>How those interests and values get processed; and </li></ul><ul><li>The extent to which decisions affect the behavior of interest groups in ways that are consistent with regulatory policy choices for a flexible and open regulatory environment conducive to sustaining advancement of telecommunications technology and services and through that, economic development. </li></ul><ul><li>[1] State control did not quickly disappear through privatization, particularly when the State retained partial ownership and golden shares. Michael Whincop et. al. underscore a problem, that is, many governments interested in privatization may have smaller short-term incentives to liberalize. These governments act under the pretense that an entity to be privatized could be sold for a higher value if it retains all or some of its monopoly power, permitting higher prices to be charged and then higher profits to be achieved. See Whincop, Michael and Rowland, Stuart, “ Plus Ca change … ”. (The effect of markets and corporate law on the governance of </li></ul>
  9. 9. Findings <ul><li>Reforms have dramatically transformed the telecommunications sector in several countries. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two percent of telecommunications firms in 167 countries were privatized in 1980; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By 1998, the number increased to forty-two percent. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In many developing countries, competition, especially in mobile phone , has increased rapidly since 2003. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The worldwide movement toward privatization and competition in the telecoms sector in the 1990s provides an industry context for studying the effects of privatization and competition in general. </li></ul><ul><li>Countries often use privatization and liberalization in this sector to signal their seriousness about instituting pro-market reforms. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Lessons Learned: India <ul><li>Privatization and competition had a large positive impact on telecommunications performance in both India and China </li></ul><ul><li>More reforms were associated with more performance gains. </li></ul><ul><li>Full privatization, which gave private owners control rights in India, were much more effective in improving performance than partial privatization, which left control rights in the hands of bureaucrats in the Indian Department of Telecommunication. </li></ul><ul><li>The Indian case history also suggests that privatization works best when there is competition that limits the market power of the incumbent(s). </li></ul><ul><li>Competition could thus be a complement to privatization. More recent research by the author includes a vector of these telecommunications reforms (i.e., reform measures). </li></ul><ul><li>India also experienced faster network expansion and improvements in both labor and total factor productivities (TFP). </li></ul><ul><li>Because of the greater incentives to innovate and save costs, the Indian telecommunication sector, particularly the mobile service sector, experienced higher TFP after privatization. </li></ul><ul><li>The increase in competitive pressure was associated with rising investment, teledensities, decreasing price for a three-minute off-peak hour local cellular phone call cost, and similar other performance measures. </li></ul><ul><li>Given the lack of telecommunications infrastructure in many developing countries, one of the main yardsticks in measuring the success of telecommunications reforms should, therefore, be the pace of network and services expansion and the concomitant lowering of price for a three-minute off-peak hour local cellular phone call cost. </li></ul><ul><li>The number of mobile phone lines per 100 inhabitants (Mobile_Densitry) and the price of a three-minute off-peak hour local cellular phone call cost (CELLCALLCOST) are, therefore, good candidates for outcome measures. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Lessons Learned: China <ul><li>China did not allow any privatization, which should lead one to investigate further the country specific effects. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The question to ask: Do the benefits of privatization depend on market institutions being in place? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>About China, the biggest concern that many foreign investors have is that appropriate institutions are not in place </li></ul><ul><li>Foreign investors anticipate less dramatic performance improvements for the Chinese economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Privatization in China is slow in coming </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Foreign investors are making positive impacts in that even partial foreign equity ownership, particularly in the equipment manufacturing sector, exhibits the highest productivity bidding process. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>China is carefully allocating the foreign equity ownership in the equipment manufacturing business. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>China’s strategy seems to be geared toward receiving a high price for all joint venture/co-production agreements because it is important for fiscal reasons. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potentially, such high prices would generate other favorable impacts: they might ensure the political legitimacy of emerging private property rights and the continued evolution of reforms that foreign investors so eagerly seek in China. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Overall Conclusions/Theoretical Findings: All Roads Lead To Rome <ul><li>To translate the preceding observations into policymakers’ language, the lessons from this privatization research are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Privatization can deliver substantial benefits. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In some cases productivity doubles; in other cases productivity can increase by single percentage points. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Privatization usually causes either no change or reduction in employment. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Based on experience, it seems that most privatizing countries manage this problem reasonably well. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Policy trade-offs are better handled when privatization is attained under transparency and openness to foreign investors. Often there are pressures from insiders and domestic investors against allowing participation by foreign entities, along with strong nationalistic fervor. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>However, disallowing foreign ownership always lowers privatization prices, with attendant decreases in post-privatization efficiency. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Privatization works well, if good institutions are present. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>China is not an outlier. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>China’s growth has come from private sector development and the empirical evidence from China suggests that non-privatizing reform measures, such as market liberalization and increased use of incentives can improve the efficiency of SOE. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Foreign investors opening up beach-heads in China argue that these reforms would yield greater dividends if the government allowed privatization. </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Take Your Pick <ul><li>India and China –these two countries have very different governments and policies, leading to differing approaches to the introduction of telecommunication competition and infrastructure development </li></ul><ul><li>India has set policy via recommendations of publicly visible independent regulatory authority </li></ul><ul><li>China has pursued a strategy of competition among government-owned organizations. </li></ul><ul><li>The Indian case study shows evidence of complimentarity between privatization and competition in deepening network penetration and in dramatically restraining the rise of service pricing among privatized operators. </li></ul><ul><li>China’s case study reveals that the state retained all the control rights, planned the country’s infrastructure development and made very little progress in regulatory reform including the enactment of telecoms laws, yet made substantial progress in infrastructure development. </li></ul><ul><li>It remains to be seen whether India's relatively transparent and market driven approach to telecommunications policy (and access) will prove effective in the long run. </li></ul>

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