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Powerpoint Plantas carnivoras

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  1. 4. Barthlott, W. et al. 2007; Juniper et al. 1989; Rice, B.A. 2006a; Schlauer, J. 2002; personal observations <ul><li>Caryophyllales </li></ul><ul><li>Dioncophyllaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Triphyophyllum (1 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Droseraceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Aldrovanda (1 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dionaea (1 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drosera (187 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Drosophyllaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Drosophyllum (1 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nepenthaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nepenthes (124+ species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ericales </li></ul><ul><li>Roridulaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Roridula (2 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sarraceniaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Darlingtonia (1 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heliamphora (18+ species) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sarracenia (11 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lamiales </li></ul><ul><li>Byblidaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Byblis (7+ species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lentibulariaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Genlisea (21+ species) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pinguicula (96+ species) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Utricularia (225+ species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Oxalidales </li></ul><ul><li>Cephalotaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cephalotus (1 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Poales </li></ul><ul><li>Bromeliaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Brocchinia (2 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Catopsis (1 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Scrophulariales </li></ul><ul><li>Pedaliaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ibicella (1, non-carnivorous) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Violales </li></ul><ul><li>Passifloraceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Passiflora (1 species) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Asterales </li></ul><ul><li>Stylidiaceae </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stylidium (? species) </li></ul></ul>More than 700 species
  2. 5. <ul><li>Room to Grow </li></ul><ul><li>Temperature </li></ul><ul><li>Light </li></ul><ul><li>Water </li></ul><ul><li>Air </li></ul>All plants need … <ul><li>NUTRIENTS </li></ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul>… seven things to grow:
  3. 6. especially NITROGEN . Carnivorous plants derive some or most of their nutrients (but not energy ) from trapping and consuming … typically insects and … live in boggy areas where the soil is thin or poor in nutrients, … but also protozoans or small animals . other arthropods …
  4. 7. Traps work in a variety of ways . Pitfall traps of pitcher plants are leaves folded into deep, slippery pools filled with digestive enzymes. Flypaper (or sticky or adhesive traps) of sundews and butterworts are leaves covered in stalked glands that exude sticky mucilage. Snap traps (or steel traps) of the Venus flytrap and waterwheel plant are hinged leaves that snap shut when trigger hairs are touched. Suction traps , unique to bladderworts, are highly modified leaves in the shape of a bladder with a hinged door lined with trigger hairs. Lobster-pot traps of corkscrew plants are twisted tubular channels lined with hairs and glands.
  5. 10. References: http://www.carnivorousplants.org/ http://www.botany.org/carnivorous_plants/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnivorous_plant http://urbanext.illinois.edu/gpe/case1/c1facts3a.html http://www.ehow.co.uk/list_7393669_nutrients-carnivorous-plants-eating-insects_.html Thank you for you atention.

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