Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning
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Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning

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This course provides a broad introduction to the methods and practice ...

This course provides a broad introduction to the methods and practice
of statistical machine learning, which is concerned with the development
of algorithms and techniques that learn from observed data by
constructing stochastic models that can be used for making predictions
and decisions. Topics covered include Bayesian inference and maximum
likelihood modeling; regression, classi¯cation, density estimation,
clustering, principal component analysis; parametric, semi-parametric,
and non-parametric models; basis functions, neural networks, kernel
methods, and graphical models; deterministic and stochastic
optimization; over¯tting, regularization, and validation.

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Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning Presentation Transcript

  • Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning -1- Marcus Hutter Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning Marcus Hutter Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia Machine Learning Summer School MLSS-2008, 2 – 15 March, Kioloa ANU RSISE NICTA
  • Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning -2- Marcus Hutter AbstractThis course provides a broad introduction to the methods and practiceof statistical machine learning, which is concerned with the developmentof algorithms and techniques that learn from observed data byconstructing stochastic models that can be used for making predictionsand decisions. Topics covered include Bayesian inference and maximumlikelihood modeling; regression, classification, density estimation,clustering, principal component analysis; parametric, semi-parametric,and non-parametric models; basis functions, neural networks, kernelmethods, and graphical models; deterministic and stochasticoptimization; overfitting, regularization, and validation.
  • Introduction to Statistical Machine Learning -3- Marcus Hutter Table of Contents 1. Introduction / Overview / Preliminaries 2. Linear Methods for Regression 3. Nonlinear Methods for Regression 4. Model Assessment & Selection 5. Large Problems 6. Unsupervised Learning 7. Sequential & (Re)Active Settings 8. Summary
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries -4- Marcus Hutter 1 INTRO/OVERVIEW/PRELIMINARIES • What is Machine Learning? Why Learn? • Related Fields • Applications of Machine Learning • Supervised↔Unsupervised↔Reinforcement Learning • Dichotomies in Machine Learning • Mini-Introduction to Probabilities
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries -5- Marcus Hutter What is Machine Learning? Machine Learning is concerned with the development of algorithms and techniques that allow computers to learnLearning in this context is the process of gaining understanding byconstructing models of observed data with the intention to use them forprediction. Related fields • Artificial Intelligence: smart algorithms • Statistics: inference from a sample • Data Mining: searching through large volumes of data • Computer Science: efficient algorithms and complex models
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries -6- Marcus Hutter Why ’Learn’ ? There is no need to “learn” to calculate payroll Learning is used when: • Human expertise does not exist (navigating on Mars), • Humans are unable to explain their expertise (speech recognition) • Solution changes in time (routing on a computer network) • Solution needs to be adapted to particular cases (user biometrics)Example: It is easier to write a program that learns to play checkers orbackgammon well by self-play rather than converting the expertise of amaster player to a program.
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries -7- Marcus Hutter Handwritten Character Recognition an example of a difficult machine learning problemTask: Learn general mapping from pixel images to digits from examples
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries -8- Marcus Hutter Applications of Machine Learning machine learning has a wide spectrum of applications including: • natural language processing, • search engines, • medical diagnosis, • detecting credit card fraud, • stock market analysis, • bio-informatics, e.g. classifying DNA sequences, • speech and handwriting recognition, • object recognition in computer vision, • playing games – learning by self-play: Checkers, Backgammon. • robot locomotion.
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries -9- Marcus Hutter Some Fundamental Types of Learning • Supervised Learning • Reinforcement Learning Classification Agents Regression • Unsupervised Learning • Others Association SemiSupervised Learning Clustering Active Learning Density Estimation
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries - 10 - Marcus Hutter Supervised Learning • Prediction of future cases: Use the rule to predict the output for future inputs • Knowledge extraction: The rule is easy to understand • Compression: The rule is simpler than the data it explains • Outlier detection: Exceptions that are not covered by the rule, e.g., fraud
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries - 11 - Marcus Hutter ClassificationExample:Credit scoringDifferentiating betweenlow-risk and high-riskcustomers from theirIncome and SavingsDiscriminant: IF income > θ1 AND savings > θ2 THEN low-risk ELSE high-risk
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries - 12 - Marcus Hutter Regression Example: Price y = f (x)+noise of a used car as function of age x
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries - 13 - Marcus Hutter Unsupervised Learning • Learning “what normally happens” • No output • Clustering: Grouping similar instances • Example applications: Customer segmentation in CRM Image compression: Color quantization Bioinformatics: Learning motifs
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries - 14 - Marcus Hutter Reinforcement Learning • Learning a policy: A sequence of outputs • No supervised output but delayed reward • Credit assignment problem • Game playing • Robot in a maze • Multiple agents, partial observability, ...
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries - 15 - Marcus Hutter Dichotomies in Machine Learning scope of my lecture ⇔ scope of other lectures (machine) learning / statistical ⇔ logic/knowledge-based (GOFAI) induction ⇔ prediction ⇔ decision ⇔ action regression ⇔ classificationindependent identically distributed ⇔ sequential / non-iid online learning ⇔ offline/batch learning passive prediction ⇔ active learning parametric ⇔ non-parametric conceptual/mathematical ⇔ computational issues exact/principled ⇔ heuristic supervised learning ⇔ unsupervised ⇔ RL learning
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries - 16 - Marcus Hutter Probability Basics Probability is used to describe uncertain events; the chance or belief that something is or will be true.Example: Fair Six-Sided Die: • Sample space: Ω = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6} • Events: Even= {2, 4, 6}, Odd= {1, 3, 5} ⊆Ω • Probability: P(6) = 1 , P(Even) = P(Odd) = 6 1 2 • Outcome: 6 ∈ E. P (6and Even) 1/6 1 • Conditional probability: P (6|Even) = = = P (Even) 1/2 3General Axioms: • P({}) = 0 ≤ P(A) ≤ 1 = P(Ω), • P(A ∪ B) + P(A ∩ B) = P(A) + P(B), • P(A ∩ B) = P(A|B)P(B).
  • Intro/Overview/Preliminaries - 17 - Marcus Hutter Probability JargonExample: (Un)fair coin: Ω = {Tail,Head} {0, 1}. P(1) = θ ∈ [0, 1]:Likelihood: P(1101|θ) = θ × θ × (1 − θ) × θ ˆMaximum Likelihood (ML) estimate: θ = arg maxθ P(1101|θ) = 3 4Prior: If we are indifferent, then P(θ) =const. 1Evidence: P(1101) = θ P(1101|θ)P(θ) = 20 (actually ) P(1101|θ)P(θ)Posterior: P(θ|1101) = P(1101) ∝ θ3 (1 − θ) (BAYES RULE!). ˆMaximum a Posterior (MAP) estimate: θ = arg maxθ P(θ|1101) = 3 4 P(11011) 2Predictive distribution: P(1|1101) = P(1101) = 3 2Expectation: E[f |...] = θ f (θ)P(θ|...), e.g. E[θ|1101] = 3 2Variance: Var(θ) = E[(θ − Eθ)2 |1101] = 63Probability density: P(θ) = 1 P([θ, θ + ε]) for ε → 0 ε
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 18 - Marcus Hutter2 LINEAR METHODS FOR REGRESSION • Linear Regression • Coefficient Subset Selection • Coefficient Shrinkage • Linear Methods for Classifiction • Linear Basis Function Regression (LBFR) • Piecewise linear, Splines, Wavelets • Local Smoothing & Kernel Regression • Regularization & 1D Smoothing Splines
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 19 - Marcus Hutter Linear Regression fitting a linear function to the data • Input “feature” vector x := (1 ≡ x(0) , x(1) , ..., x(d) ) ∈ I d+1 R • Real-valued noisy response y ∈ I R. • Linear regression model: y = fw (x) = w0 x(0) + ... + wd x(d) ˆ • Data: D = (x1 , y1 ), ..., (xn , yn ) • Error or loss function: Example: Residual sum of squares: n Loss(w) = i=1 (yi − fw (xi ))2 • Least squares (LSQ) regression: w = arg minw Loss(w) ˆ • Example: Person’s weight y as a function of age x1 , height x2 .
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 20 - Marcus Hutter Coefficient Subset SelectionProblems with least squares regression if d is large: • Overfitting: The plane fits the data well (perfect for d ≥ n), but predicts (generalizes) badly. • Interpretation: We want to identify a small subset of features important/relevant for predicting y.Solution 1: Subset selection:Take those k out of d features that minimize the LSQ error.
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 21 - Marcus Hutter Coefficient ShrinkageSolution 2: Shrinkage methods:Shrink the least squares wby penalizing the Loss:Ridge regression: Add ∝ ||w||2 . 2Lasso: Add ∝ ||w||1 .Bayesian linear regression:Comp. MAP arg maxw P(w|D)from prior P (w) andsampling model P (D|w). Weights of low variance components shrink most.
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 22 - Marcus Hutter Linear Methods for ClassificationExample: Y = {spam,non-spam} {−1, 1} (or {0, 1})Reduction to regression: Regard y ∈ I ⇒ w from linear regression. R ˆBinary classification: If fw (x) > 0 then y = 1 else y = −1. ˆ ˆ ˆProbabilistic classification: Predict probability that new x is in class y. P(y=1|x,D) Log-odds log P(y=0|x,D) := fw (x) ˆImprovements: • Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) • Logistic Regression • Perceptron • Maximum Margin Hyperplane • Support Vector MachineGeneralization to non-binary Y possible.
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 23 - Marcus Hutter Linear Basis Function Regression (LBFR) = powerful generalization of and reduction to linear regression!Problem: Response y ∈ I is often not linear in x ∈ I d . R RSolution: Transform x ; φ(x) with φ : I d → I p . R R Assume/hope response y ∈ I is now linear in φ. RExamples: • Linear regression: p = d and φi (x) = xi . • Polynomial regression: d = 1 and φi (x) = xi . • Piecewise constant regression: E.g. d = 1 with φi (x) = 1 for i ≤ x < i + 1 and 0 else. • Piecewise polynomials ... • Splines ...
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 24 - Marcus Hutter
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 25 - Marcus Hutter2D Spline LBFR and 1D Symmlet-8 Wavelets
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 26 - Marcus Hutter Local Smoothing & Kernel RegressionEstimate f (x) by averaging the yi for all xi a-close to x: Pn ˆ f (x) = Pn K(x,xi )yi i=1 K(x,xi ) i=1 Generalization to other K,Nearest-Neighbor Kernel: e.g. quadratic (Epanechnikov) Kernel:K(x, xi ) = 1 if { |x−xi |<a and 0 else K(x, xi ) = max{0, a2 − (x − xi )2 }
  • Linear Methods for Regression - 27 - Marcus Hutter Regularization & 1D Smoothing Splines to avoid overfitting if function class is large ˆ = arg minf { n (yi −f (xi ))2 + λ (f (x))2 dx} f i=1 • λ=0 ˆ ⇒ f =any function through data • λ=∞ ˆ ⇒ f =least squares line fit • 0<λ<∞ ˆ ⇒ f =piecwise cubic with continuous derivative
  • Nonlinear Regression - 28 - Marcus Hutter 3 NONLINEAR REGRESSION • Artificial Neural Networks • Kernel Trick • Maximum Margin Classifier • Sparse Kernel Methods / SVMs
  • Nonlinear Regression - 29 - Marcus Hutter Artificial Neural Networks 1 as non-linear function approximator Single hidden layer feed- forward neural network d (1) • Hidden layer: zj = h( i=0 wji xi ) M (2) • Output: fw,k (x) = σ( j=0 wkj zj ) • Sigmoidal activation functions: h() and σ() ⇒ f non-linear • Goal: Find network weights best modeling the data: • Back-propagation algorithm: n Minimize i=1 ||y i − f w (xi )||2 2 w.r.t. w by gradient decent.
  • Nonlinear Regression - 30 - Marcus Hutter Artificial Neural Networks 2 • Avoid overfitting by early stopping or small M . • Avoid local minima by random initial weights or stochastic gradient descent. Example: Image Processing
  • Nonlinear Regression - 31 - Marcus Hutter Kernel Trick The Kernel-Trick allows to reduce the functional minimization to finite-dimensional optimization. • Let L(y, f (x)) be any loss function • and J(f ) be a penalty quadratic in f . n • then minimum of penalized loss i=1 L(yi , f (xi )) + λJ(f ) n • has form f (x) = i=1 αi K(x, xi ) n • with α minimizing i=1 L(yi , (Kα)i ) + λα Kα. • and Kernel K ij = K(xi , xj ) following from J.
  • Nonlinear Regression - 32 - Marcus Hutter Maximum Margin Classifier ˆ w = arg max min{yi (w φ(xi ))} with y ∈ {−1, 1} w:||w||=1 i • Linear boundary for φb (x) = x(b) . • Boundary is determined by Support Vectors (circled data points) • Margin negative if classes not separable.
  • Nonlinear Regression - 33 - Marcus Hutter Sparse Kernel Methods / SVMsNon-linear boundary for general φb (x) nw=ˆ i=1 ai φ(xi ) for some a. ˆ n⇒ f (x) = w φ(x) = i=1 ai K(xi , x) ˆ depends only on φ via Kernel d K(xi , x) = b=1 φb (xi )φb (x).⇒ Huge time savings if d nExample K(x, x ): • polynomial (1 + x, x )d , • Gaussian exp(−||x − x ||2 ), 2 • neural network tanh( x, x ).
  • Model Assessment & Selection - 34 - Marcus Hutter 4 MODEL ASSESSMENT & SELECTION • Example: Polynomial Regression • Training=Empirical versus Test=True Error • Empirical Model Selection • Theoretical Model Selection • The Loss Rank Principle for Model Selection
  • Model Assessment & Selection - 35 - Marcus Hutter Example: Polynomial Regression • Straight line does not fit data well (large training error) high bias ⇒ poor predictive performance • High order polynomial fits data perfectly (zero training error) high variance (overfitting) ⇒ poor prediction too! • Reasonable polynomial degree d performs well. How to select d? minimizing training error obviously does not work.
  • Model Assessment & Selection - 36 - Marcus Hutter Training=Empirical versus Test=True Error • Learn functional relation f for data D = {(x1 , y1 ), ..., (xn , yn )}. • We can compute the empirical error on past data: 1 n ErrD (f ) = n i=1 (yi − f (xi ))2 . • Assume data D is sample from some distribution P. • We want to know the expected true error on future examples: ErrP (f ) = EP [(y − f (x))]. • How good an estimate of ErrP (f ) is ErrD (f ) ? • Problem: ErrD (f ) decreases with increasing model complexity, but not ErrP (f ).
  • Model Assessment & Selection - 37 - Marcus Hutter Empirical Model SelectionHow to select complexity parameter • Kernel width a, • penalization constant λ, • number k of nearest neighbors, • the polynomial degree d?Empirical test-set-based methods: Regress on training set and mini- mize empirical error w.r.t. “com- plexity” parameter (a, λ, k, d) on a separate test-set.Sophistication: cross-validation, bootstrap, ...
  • Model Assessment & Selection - 38 - Marcus Hutter Theoretical Model SelectionHow to select complexity or flexibility or smoothness parameter:Kernel width a, penalization constant λ, number k of nearest neighbors,the polynomial degree d?For parametric regression with d parameters: • Bayesian model selection, • Akaike Information Criterion (AIC), • Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC), • Minimum Description Length (MDL),They all add a penalty proportional to d to the loss.For non-parametric linear regression: • Add trace of on-data regressor = effective # of parameters to loss. • Loss Rank Principle (LoRP).
  • Model Assessment & Selection - 39 - Marcus HutterThe Loss Rank Principle for Model Selection ˆcLet fD : X → Y be the (best) regressor of complexity c on data D. ˆcThe loss Rank of fD is defined as the number of other (fictitious) data ˆc ˆcD that are fitted better by fD than D is fitted by fD . ˆc • c is small ⇒ fD fits D badly ⇒ many other D can be fitted better ⇒ Rank is large. • c is large ⇒ many D can be fitted well ⇒ Rank is large. ˆc • c is appropriate ⇒ fD fits D well and not too many other D can be fitted well ⇒ Rank is small. LoRP: Select model complexity c that has minimal loss RankUnlike most penalized maximum likelihood variants (AIC,BIC,MDL), • LoRP only depends on the regression and the loss function. • It works without a stochastic noise model, and • is directly applicable to any non-parametric regressor, like kNN.
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 40 - Marcus Hutter5 HOW TO ATTACK LARGE PROBLEMS • Probabilistic Graphical Models (PGM) • Trees Models • Non-Parametric Learning • Approximate (Variational) Inference • Sampling Methods • Combining Models • Boosting
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 41 - Marcus Hutter Probabilistic Graphical Models (PGM)Visualize structure of model and (in)dependence⇒ faster and more comprehensible algorithms • Nodes = random variables. • Edges = stochastic dependencies. • Bayesian network = directed PGM • Markov random field = undirected PGMExample: P(x1 )P(x2 )P(x3 )P(x4 |x1 x2 x3 )P(x5 |x1 x3 )P (x6 |x4 )P(x7 |x4 x5 )
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 42 - Marcus HutterAdditive Models & Trees & Related Methods Generalized additive model: f (x) = α + f1 (x1 ) + ... + fd (xd ) Reduces determining f : I d → I to d 1d functions fb : I → I R R R R Classification/decision trees: Outlook: • PRIM, • bump hunting, • How to learn tree structures.
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 43 - Marcus Hutter Regression Trees f (x) = cb for x ∈ Rb , and cb = Average[yi |xi ∈ Rb ]
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 44 - Marcus Hutter Non-Parametric Learning = prototype methods = instance-based learning = model-freeExamples: • K-means: Data clusters around K centers with cluster means µ1 , ...µK . Assign xi to closest cluster center. • K Nearest neighbors regression (kNN): Estimate f (x) by averaging the yi for the k xi closest to x: • Kernel regression: n ˆ i=1 K(x, xi )yi Take a weighted average f (x) = n . i=1 K(x, xi )
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 45 - Marcus Hutter
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 46 - Marcus Hutter Approximate (Variational) InferenceApproximate full distribution P(z) by q(z) Examples: GaussiansPopular: Factorized distribution:q(z) = q1 (z1 ) × ... × qM (zM ).Measure of fit: Relative entropyKL(p||q) = p(z) log p(z) dz q(z)Red curves: Left min-imizes KL(P||q), Mid-dle and Right are thetwo local minima ofKL(q||P).
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 47 - Marcus Hutter Elementary Sampling Methods How to sample from P : Z → [0, 1]? • Special sampling algorithms for standard distributions P. • Rejection sampling: Sample z uniformly from domain Z, but accept sample only with probability ∝ P(z). • Importance sampling: 1 L E[f ] = f (z)p(z)dz L l=1 f (z l )p(z l )/q(z l ), where z l are sampled from q. Choose q easy to sample and large where f (z l )p(z l ) is large. • Others: Slice sampling
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 48 - Marcus HutterMarkov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) SamplingMetropolis: Choose some conve-nient q with q(z|z ) = q(z |z).Sample z l+1 from q(·|z l ) butaccept only with probabilitymin{1, p(zl+1 )/p(z l )}.Gibbs Sampling: Metropolis withq leaving z unchanged from l ;l + 1,except resample coordinatei from P(zi |z i ). Green lines are accepted and red lines are rejected Metropolis steps.
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 49 - Marcus Hutter Combining Models Performance can often be improved by combining multiple models in some way, instead of just using a single model in isolation • Committees: Average the predictions of a set of individual models. • Bayesian model averaging: P(x) = Models P(x|Model)P(Model) • Mixture models: P(x|θ, π) = k πk Pk (x|θk ) • Decision tree: Each model is responsible for a different part of the input space. • Boosting: Train many weak classifiers in sequence and combine output to produce a powerful committee.
  • How to Attack Large Problems - 50 - Marcus Hutter BoostingIdea: Train many weak classifiers Gm in sequence andcombine output to produce a powerful committee G.AdaBoost.M1: [Freund & Schapire (1997) received famous G¨del-Prize] oInitialize observation weights wi uniformly.For m = 1 to M do:(a) Gm classifies x as Gm (x) ∈ {−1, 1}. Train Gm weighing data i with wi .(b) Give Gm high/low weight αi if it performed well/bad.(c) Increase attention=weight wi for obs. xi misclassified by Gm . MOutput weighted majority vote: G(x) = sign( m=1 αm Gm (x))
  • Unsupervised Learning - 51 - Marcus Hutter 6 UNSUPERVISED LEARNING • K-Means Clustering • Mixture Models • Expectation Maximization Algorithm
  • Unsupervised Learning - 52 - Marcus Hutter Unsupervised LearningSupervised learning: Find functional relation-ship f : X → Y from I/O data {(xi , yi )}Unsupervised learning:Find pattern in data (x1 , ..., xn )without an explicit teacher (no y values).Example: Clustering e.g. by K-meansImplicit goal: Find simple explanation,i.e. compress data (MDL, Occam’s razor).Density estimation: From which probabilitydistribution P are the xi drawn?
  • Unsupervised Learning - 53 - Marcus Hutter K-means Clustering and EM • Data points seem to cluster around two centers. • Assign each data point i to a cluster ki . • Let µk = center of cluster k. • Distortion measure: Total distance2 of data points from cluster centers: n J(k, µ) := i=1 ||xi − µki ||2 • Choose centers µk initially at random. • M-step: Minimize J w.r.t. k: Assign each point to closest center • E-step: Minimize J w.r.t. µ: Let µk be the mean of points belonging to cluster k • Iteration of M-step and E-step converges to local minimum of J.
  • Unsupervised Learning - 54 - Marcus Hutter Iterations of K-means EM Algorithm
  • Unsupervised Learning - 55 - Marcus Hutter Mixture Models and EMMixture of Gaussians: KP(x|πµΣ) = i=1 Gauss(x|µk , Σk )πkMaximize likelihood P(x|...) w.r.t. π, µ, Σ.E-Step: Compute proba-bility γik that data point ibelongs to cluster k, basedon estimates π, µ, Σ.M-Step: Re-estimate π,µ, Σ (take empiricalmean/variance) given γik .
  • Non-IID: Sequential & (Re)Active Settings - 56 - Marcus Hutter7 NON-IID: SEQUENTIAL & (RE)ACTIVE SETTINGS • Sequential Data • Sequential Decision Theory • Learning Agents • Reinforcement Learning (RL) • Learning in Games
  • Non-IID: Sequential & (Re)Active Settings - 57 - Marcus Hutter Sequential Data nGeneral stochastic time-series: P(x1 ...xn ) = i=1 P(xi |x1 ...xi−1 )Independent identically distributed (roulette,dice,classification):P(x1 ...xn ) = P(x1 )P(x2 )...P(xn )First order Markov chain (Backgammon):P(x1 ...xn ) = P(x1 )P(x2 |x1 )P(x3 |x2 )...P(xn |xn−1 )Second order Markov chain (mechanical systems):P(x1 ...xn ) = P(x1 )P(x2 |x1 )P(x3 |x1 x2 )× ... × P(xn |xn−1 xn−2 )Hidden Markov model (speech recognition):P(x1 ...xn ) = P(z1 )P(z2 |z1 )...P(zn |zn−1 ) n × i=1 P(xi |zi )dz
  • Non-IID: Sequential & (Re)Active Settings - 58 - Marcus Hutter Sequential Decision TheorySetup: Example: Weather Forecasting For t = 1, 2, 3, 4, ... xt ∈ X = {sunny, rainy} Given sequence x1 , x2 , ..., xt−1 yt ∈ Y = {umbrella, sunglasses} (1) predict/make decision yt , Loss sunny rainy (2) observe xt , umbrella 0.1 0.3 (3) suffer loss Loss(xt , yt ), (4) t → t + 1, goto (1) sunglasses 0.0 1.0Goal: Minimize expected Loss: yt = arg minyt E[Loss(xt , yt )|x1 ...xt−1 ] ˆGreedy minimization of expected loss is optimal if:Important: Decision yt does not influence env. (future observations). Loss = square / absolute / 0-1 error functionExamples: y ˆ = mean / median / mode of P(xt | · · · )
  • Non-IID: Sequential & (Re)Active Settings - 59 - Marcus Hutter Learning Agents 1 sensors percepts ? environment agent actions actuators Additional complication: Learner can influence environment, and hence what he observes next. ⇒ farsightedness, planning, exploration necessary. Exploration ⇔ Exploitation problem
  • Non-IID: Sequential & (Re)Active Settings - 60 - Marcus Hutter Learning Agents 2 Performance standard Critic Sensors feedback Environment changes Learning Performance element element knowledge learning goals Problem generator Agent Actuators
  • Non-IID: Sequential & (Re)Active Settings - 61 - Marcus Hutter Reinforcement Learning (RL) r1 | o1 r2 | o2 r3 | o3 r4 | o4 r5 | o5 r6 | o6 ... ¨¨ ‰ r rr ¨ % ¨ r Agent Environ- p ment q €€  I  € €€   € q y1 y2 y3 y4 y5 y6 ... • RL is concerned with how an agent ought to take actions in an environment so as to maximize its long-term reward. • Find policy that maps states of the world to the actions the agent ought to take in those states. • The environment is typically formulated as a finite-state Markov decision process (MDP).
  • Non-IID: Sequential & (Re)Active Settings - 62 - Marcus Hutter Learning in Games • Learning though self-play. • Backgammon (TD-Gammon). • Samuel’s checker program.
  • Summary - 63 - Marcus Hutter 8 SUMMARY • Important Loss Functions • Learning Algorithm Characteristics Comparison • More Learning • Data Sets • Journals • Annual Conferences • Recommended Literature
  • Summary - 64 - Marcus Hutter Important Loss Functions
  • Summary - 65 - Marcus HutterLearning Algorithm Characteristics Comparison
  • Summary - 66 - Marcus Hutter More Learning • Concept Learning • Bayesian Learning • Computational Learning Theory (PAC learning) • Genetic Algorithms • Learning Sets of Rules • Analytical Learning
  • Summary - 67 - Marcus Hutter Data Sets • UCI Repository: http://www.ics.uci.edu/ mlearn/MLRepository.html • UCI KDD Archive: http://kdd.ics.uci.edu/summary.data.application.html • Statlib: http://lib.stat.cmu.edu/ • Delve: http://www.cs.utoronto.ca/ delve/
  • Summary - 68 - Marcus Hutter Journals • Journal of Machine Learning Research • Machine Learning • IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence • Neural Computation • Neural Networks • IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks • Annals of Statistics • Journal of the American Statistical Association • ...
  • Summary - 69 - Marcus Hutter Annual Conferences • Algorithmic Learning Theory (ALT) • Computational Learning Theory (COLT) • Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI) • Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS) • European Conference on Machine Learning (ECML) • International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML) • International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI) • International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks (ICANN)
  • Summary - 70 - Marcus Hutter Recommended Literature[Bis06] C. M. Bishop. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning. Springer, 2006.[HTF01] T. Hastie, R. Tibshirani, and J. H. Friedman. The Elements of Statistical Learning. Springer, 2001.[Alp04] E. Alpaydin. Introduction to Machine Learning. MIT Press, 2004.[Hut05] M. Hutter. Universal Artificial Intelligence: Sequential Decisions based on Algorithmic Probability. Springer, Berlin, 2005. http://www.hutter1.net/ai/uaibook.htm.