Fotrot lecture

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  • Treatment is directed at preventing or controlling secondary infection. Administration of antibiotics to control secondary infection and good nursing care are recommended. Infection results in good immunity.
  • Treatment is directed at preventing or controlling secondary infection. Administration of antibiotics to control secondary infection and good nursing care are recommended. Infection results in good immunity.
  • Treatment is directed at preventing or controlling secondary infection. Administration of antibiotics to control secondary infection and good nursing care are recommended. Infection results in good immunity.
  • Treatment is directed at preventing or controlling secondary infection. Administration of antibiotics to control secondary infection and good nursing care are recommended. Infection results in good immunity.
  • Treatment is directed at preventing or controlling secondary infection. Administration of antibiotics to control secondary infection and good nursing care are recommended. Infection results in good immunity.
  • .

Fotrot lecture Fotrot lecture Presentation Transcript

  • Footrot
  • It is a painful, debilitating bacterial infection of the foot characterized by interdigital dermatitis and severe lameness and loss of body condition.
  • Etiology • Fusobacterium necrophorum (soil & animal feces). Benign footrot. • Dichelobacter (Bacteroides) nodosus responsible for sheep footrot infection. – lives feet of sheep, only survive for 7 to 14 days anywhere else. persist for up to three years in chronically infected hooves. Gram negative.
  • Epidemiology • Distribution. • Susceptibility: mainly sheep (goats. Cattle, deer) • Source of infection: diseased animals and carriers . • wet and rocked areas are predisposing factors.
  • Pathogenesis • Wet and worm weather  Damaged skin and invasion of fusobacterium necrophorum  iterdigital dermatitis invasion of B. nodosus which produce exotoxin  severe inflammation and damage of sensetive laminae of the claw lead to severe lameness and separation of its wall.
  • Clinical Signs • Lameness, animals carry the leg, walk on its knee, may be recumbent, foul-smell exudates oozes from the lesions, severe interdigital dermatitis and separation of hoofs. Systemic reaction may occur and characterized by anorexia and fever.
  • Diagnosis • Clinical • Smear from the lesions and stained by Gram.
  • Treatment • Paring: removal of dirt and infected tissues & exposure to air.
  • Treatment • Paring: removal of dirt and infected tissues & exposure to air. - foot bathing (5% formalin or 10% zinc sulphate (toxic) for 2 minutes.
  • Treatment • Paring: removal of dirt and infected tissues & exposure to air. - foot bathing (5% formalin or 10% zinc sulphate (toxic) for 2 minutes. - topical antibiotic (oxytetracyclines 5%) or injection of penicillin 70,000iu/kg.
  • Treatment • Paring: removal of dirt and infected tissues & exposure to air. - foot bathing (5% formalin or 10% zinc sulphate (toxic) for 2 minutes. - topical antibiotic (oxytetracyclines 5%) or injection of penicillin 70,000iu/kg. - vaccination against B.nodosus by either whole cell bacterin or pilus antigen vaccine.
  • Treatment For eradication: • Any chronic infected animals should be culled  clean animals – Paring then foot bathing, held in pens for an hour then release in the clean pasture which does not have animals for at least 2 weeks. Re-bathing after one week and if there is infected animals should be moved to dirty group  dirty animals – Paring then foot bathing, antibiotic treatment. Re-bathing after one week and examined, if they are still affected  culled – If they are clean  clean group.
  • Dermatophilosis lumpy wool, strawberry footrot, mycotic dermatitis
  • contagious exudative and proliferative epidermitis caused by Dermatophilus congolensis characterized by thick scab and lumpy wool.
  • Etiology • Dermatophilus congolensis. Gram positive facultative aerobic bacteria. Filamentous organism ( parallel rows of cocci). Zoonotic. Can live in dried scab for up to years.
  • Epidemiology • Distribution: tropical & subtropical. • Susceptibility: cattle, sheep, goats, horses (pigs, dogs, cats) • Source : diseased animals and carriers.
  • Epidemiology • transmission: direct contact or through exposure to contaminated (fomites) or by biting insects (vectors). • wet weather and abrasions are predisposing factors (3).
  • Pathogenesis • Wet and worm weather+ Damaged skin the zoospores become motile and germinate and commence filamentous growth penetrate epidermis  inflammatory reaction  accumulation of large numbers of neutrophils  microabscess formation  scab formation.
  • Clinical Signs • exudative dermatitis, moist scab at the base of the wool. • lumpy wool, accidental removal of scab lead to raw bleeding areas flies. • signs may disappear in 1-2 weeks in some cases. • strawberry footrot (hyperaemia, papules, exudation and scale dom- shaped).
  • Diagnosis • Signs + seasonal occurrence. • Smear or scab emulsified by water from the lesions and stained by Gram, Giemsa, methylene blue. • fluorescent antibody tech. • Culture on blood agar.
  • Treatment - Sheep dip in zinc sulphate 0.2% - 0.5%, potassium aluminium sulphate 1%. - long acting oxytetracycline 20mg/kg, penicillin 70,000iu/kg.
  • Control • isolation of infected animals. • avoid contact with infected materials. • dip all animals in summer and autumn in zinc sulphate 0.2% - 0.5%, potassium aluminium sulphate 1%.
  • Control • dusting animals with alum. • tick control. • avoid holding sheep indoor in wet conditions