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Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
Bba project about customer centric
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Bba project about customer centric

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  • 1. 1.1 INTRODUCTION ABOUT TOPIC A customer centric company culture can only be created if the CEO and all other topmanagement are continuously listening to the voice of customer and are a actively involved inimproving customer satisfaction. Top management prioritization of customer need should be manifested in muchtangible ways, from reviewing top customer complaints to creating incentive for all employeesbased on the customer satisfaction. The voice of the customer should truly be a priority for all functions, not just thecustomer facing ones (like call centers) which have an immediate effect on customersatisfaction. Voice of the customer as a top management priority does not mean that investmentsshould be made to increase customer satisfaction without proper business cases, but rather thatthe right investment needs are properly identified and that customer treatment is as good aspossible at all times given the situation.1.2Management Actions for Customer Centricity Frequently review which are the top customer complaints, questions and suggestions.Define frequently review key customer service KPIs – e.g., call center waiting times. Set timeaside to interact with individual customers – e.g., personally respond to a certain number of e-mails per month. Visit key corporate accounts and channel partners/distributors on a regularbasis to listen and learn. Visit customer facing staff – e.g., call center operators, regularly to get a sense of thesentiment in the customer base. Institutionalize customer satisfaction surveys and reviews ofthe results and implications on a regular basis. 1
  • 2. Drive usage of customer focus group and other research to get early customer input on newimportant initiatives Institutionalize a „best customer suggestion‟ – prize given out to the customer thatgives the best improvement suggestion. Encourage all employees to participate in driving customer satisfaction by introducingemployee suggestion reward programs. Create incentives for all employees based on customersatisfaction.1.3Capabilities to deliver CRMVoice of the customer as top management priorityCustomer insight Understanding of drivers of customer behavior and specific value of activities relatingto churn and cross/up sellSegmentation and customer valueCustomer profitabilityValue based segmentationValue VS other scoresRetention and development initiatives Customer retention and development initiatives leveraging both outbound and inboundcontact and including loyalty program which help drive new product uptake and reduce churn Campaigning, loyalty programs and customer experience execution to deliver retentionand development initiatives and delivery of a customer experience which maximizessatisfactionContinues improvementContinues improvement strategy for customer data gathering and satisfaction follow-up 2
  • 3. Organization Cross-functional processes and organization mechanisms, skill building programs,hiring and incentive systems closely linked to CRM objectives and KPIsIT IT architecture and investment prioritization linked directly to key capability buildingprogramImplementation approach „Do-it, try-it, fix-it‟ approach to implementationNew product development CRM input of customer insight to new sticky and innovative product and propositiondevelopment1.4. OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY What businesses today needs are customer service standards. For an organization to be„market– led‟ it must be „customer – driven‟. The only way to embed customer service into theculture of a business is through a „management – led‟ obsession for being „customer – driven‟.Businesses need to understand that customers are not something who is bolted onto a businessat the end of a process. They are rather the vital core element without which the businesswould not exist. To survive and grow, a business needs to make profit. In order to make profit, thebusiness should be able to find people who are willing to pay more for the products andservices than they cost to avail them. Thus, it clearly means customers are the profits of abusiness. This may look very simplistic, but its implications are meant to be understood. If allprofits of a business come from customers, then it makes sense to focus business on andaround this source of profit. 3
  • 4. Looking at this process, we can deduce that the employees of a company create andadd value directly or indirectly to the product or the services so that the customers are willingto pay the price they pay to avail them. We can thus state that if an employee is not serving acustomer directly, then he surely is serving someone who actually is serving the customerdirectly. Directly or indirectly all employees in an organization is actually serving thecustomer. This leads to the customer centric organizational structure of an enterprise – whichfrom a macro perspective should consist of two main layers: 1) Of People who server thecustomers directly, and 2) Of People who serve people, who serve the customers directly (i.e.people in layer 1). Once we have the organizational structure of a customer centric organization in place,what we next need to do is start estimating the lifetime worth of a customer. The organizationshould estimate how much the customer would spend on his purchases from the organizationfor the rest of his life if he were to purchase the supplies that the organization so provides tothe customer, i.e. his lifetime purchases. A single purchase is the „Transaction Value‟ andlifetime of purchases from the organization is the „Relationship Value‟. Diving at theRelationship Value is simple: from the Transaction Value we arrive to an estimated annualtransaction value (total sales / total no. of customers) figure and multiply the same with thepotential lifetime of purchasing to arrive at the Relationship Value of a customer. We thus, arrive to the magic figure, which states a customer‟s lifetime worth. Basingthese facts and figures, we can generate an organizational growth chart showing theprospective growth of an organization if the organization is able to deliver and keep itscustomers satisfied. This also enables the management to weigh organization‟s short – termand long – term potential. It is an excellent tool for comparing the present and future scenario.Thus, customer satisfaction becomes a must. Focusing on understanding customer satisfaction, there have been extensive researchesdone on understanding various levels of customer satisfaction. Let us consider a satisfied 4
  • 5. customer as the mid – point and try and categorize customers into various satisfaction levels.We find that there are mainly three categories that we can derive to – namely: “delightedcustomers”, “satisfied customers” and “dissatisfied customers”. Delighted customers are thosewho are more than satisfied. They fall above the satisfied customers on the customersatisfaction graph. Dissatisfied customers are those who fall below the satisfied customers onthe customer satisfaction graph.Satisfied Customers: How do we mathematically equate the term „satisfied customer‟? Asatisfied customer is a customer who arises from the equation of:What you Provide = what you Promised / or what they Expected out of the purchase.Satisfied Customers – are those who continue to purchase from you as long as there are nobetter options / alternatives. They are not to be mistaken as „Loyal Customers‟. They doprovide referrals, but very few in numbers. Therefore, we necessarily need to estimate whatfigurative gain a potential satisfied customers can provide = Average Relationship Value x No.of referrals. Thus, we deduce an average value of a satisfied customer.Dissatisfied Customers: Analyzing the equation of the occurrence of a satisfied customer, wecan deduce the equation of a dissatisfied customer:What you Provide < What you Promised / or what they Expected out of the purchase.If the customer does not get what he expected to deserve, he surely will be dissatisfied. Thereare of course various degrees and reasons of being dissatisfied. Dissatisfied customers are likean anchor to growth of a business. They could also be the reason to sink you.Dissatisfied Customers will surely stop purchasing from you sooner or later as they findanother supplier – if no extra steps are taken to remove the cause of dissatisfaction. Theycould further, affect you adversely by destroying potential customers. They could also spreadnews to competitors who could use and possibly exaggerate the story to spoil further potential 5
  • 6. customers. Research provides that 96% of the times, the cause of dissatisfaction will not bereported to you and up to 90% of these customers will never come back. The referrals made bythe dissatisfied customer are a lot more. Thus, the losses caused by a potential dissatisfiedcustomer = Average Relationship Value X No. of referrals. We would obviously not like tohave these losses on our Customer Relationship Balance Sheet. Therefore, it is a must toanalyze and go out of the way to pick up customer‟s complaints and exactly know how toreact to the same.Delighted Customers: Delighted customers can be defined by the equation:What you Provide > what you Promised / or what they Expected out of the Purchase.Satisfied customers are just not enough for an enterprise to survive the socio – economicculture so prevailing. How do we create delighted customers? How much is delight? Delight isany noticeable amount that the customer will value. It is a simple and an inexpensive thing putup at the right time and right moment in the right way that creates that little thing whichconverts satisfaction into delight. The only way to create delight is by being customer centric.It has to be a team effort by the organization as one entity. Every contact point between theorganization and the customer provides for an opportunity to create delight. Not only satisfiedcustomers can be transformed to being Delighted Customers, rather Dissatisfied customers toocan be recovered to become Delighted Customers.Delighted Customers can be considered as moving individuals creating direct publicity. Thesecan be considered as Loyal Customers. Potential of a Delighted Customer = AverageRelationship Value x No. of referrals where the No. of referrals is far > the No. of referrals ofa Satisfied Customer. Further, they are direct assets of the company as they directly increasemarket value of the company. 6
  • 7. Now, that we have all the potential worth‟s of the above-mentioned customers, you probablywill say „it sounds amazing and looks so farfetched‟. All calculations done on customer‟s lifespan and to achieve all of it at least ten to fifty years (as per your assumption of Customer‟sLife Span of Purchase). Who cares? Let us do another small experimental calculation – let usconvert those years to minutes and then hourly calculate the Bank Balance of the enterprise forone day. A few dissatisfied customers in few minutes could turn your company‟s balance intohuge losses and a few satisfied customers could create some real value. At the end of that day– you‟ll come to know whether you are still in business or are you one of the fortunes 500. Iguess you surely can feel the shiver. Customers are profits. Profits are the fuel towards growth.To create growth, create delighted customers. To create delighted customers, be CustomerCentric. 7
  • 8. 2.1profilTRF Limited is part of the TATA Group of companies – India‟s leading business group in theprivate sector.The combined competencies of three companies, the erstwhile Tata RobinsFraser (established in 1962), Tata Material Handling Systems (formerly Tata Man. Ghh.,established in 1978), and Tata Techno dyne (established in 1996), helped create TRF. Thecompany is regarded as one of the most comprehensive sources of engineering equipment,systems and services. It manufactures bulk material handling and processing equipment, bulkmaterial handling systems, coke oven equipment, coal dust injection systems for blastfurnaces, coal beneficiation systems, and port and yard equipment. EPC and EPCM servicesincluding mini blast furnace technology are also provided. The company caters to diverseindustries including power, metallurgy, chemical, mining and cement.As India‟s largest private sector employer, the group today has a family of about 2, 25,000employees. The TATA group is have been pioneer in India in areas like- Integrated steel plant Power utility I.T. Software venture Luxury hotel chain Indigenous passenger car Chemical and salt work works and so on.TRF, incorporated in 1962, on its part, has been the leader in engineering, manufacture,supply, erection, testing and commissioning of bulk material handling equipment and systemin India. Today TRF, with its expertise and extensive experience, provides a wide range ofquality equipment, system and service for material, sizing and dressing of bulk material.With the amalgamation of two TATA companies – TATA Material Handling System Limited– in April 1999, TRF now offers the most comprehensive range of port, yard and bulk material 8
  • 9. handling equipment and allied service and system .it is also carries out project implementationon EPC (engineering, procurement and construction) basic or provides EPC services forsetting up of small and medium size plants. The company operated through the following four divisions:  Bulk material handling equipment division.  Bulk material handling system division.  Port and York equipment.2.2VISION AND MISSIONTRF Ltd new vision was ceremoniously launched by its Chairman, Jamshed J Irani, along withManaging Director, Mr. Sudhir Deoras and President of Tata Robins Fraser Labour Union,Mr. Rakeshwar Pandey in the presence of its employees and external stakeholders in afunction held on April 5, 2008...Dr Jamshed J Irani, Chairman, TRF Ltd said that while it is important to set a Vision, it waseven more important to achieve them within a given time frame as vision without action wasjust a dream. He emphasized that the goals set in Vision-2013 must be achieved by the year2013, if not earlier.Mr. Sudhir Deoras, Managing Director, TRF Ltd said that he was confident that TRF Ltdwould achieve the goals laid in Vision 2013. The Company is gradually raising the bar of itsperformance and this indicated it had the potential to improve its performance. However, hesaid that the Company must now work with a sense of urgency and execute its projects andorders with the customer‟s interest in mind.The President of Tata Robins Fraser Lab our Union, Mr.Rakes warPandey, said that hebelieved that the employees of TRF Ltd had the potential to achieve the goals laid in Vision- 9
  • 10. 2013. This he said had been demonstrated by them and the new vision would facilitate them toenhance their focus on and help to achieve their targets on sustainable basis.We will grow five times in five years and become a Rs. 2500 crore company by 2013, byenhancing focus on material handling business and entering new businesses as necessary. Wewill expand our business on a sustainable basis by building a team that is passionate aboutserving all its stakeholders and is committed to making Trust, Respect and Fellowship, a Wayof life.To be an international leader in material handling equipment, processes and systems.2.3JOINT VENTURES TRF forms joint venture with Tata Capital and Jasper IndustriesTRF has entered into a shareholders‟ agreement along with Tata Capital and Jasper Industriesto form a joint venture viz, Adithya Automotive Applications.Adithya Automotive Applications is a private limited company constituted with one of themain objects of engaging in the business of automotive applications to provide end solutionsthrough fabrications and machining for vehicles to be used as tippers, load bodies, trailers,refrigerated bodies, etc. 10
  • 11. The shareholding pattern of the joint venture of Adithya Automotive Applications would beas follows: Sr.no Name of the company Shareholding per cent 1 TRF 51 per cent 2 Jasper Industries 29 per cent 3 Tata Capital 20 per cent2.4Listing on Stock ExchangesThe Company‟s shares are listed on - (1) Bombay Stock Exchange Ltd. (BSE);(2) National Stock Exchange of India Ltd. (NSE); (3) Calcutta Stock Exchange Ltd. (CSE).The Company has paid the annual listing fees to all the Stock Exchanges for the financial year2010-11.Stock Code: 505854 (BSE), TRF (NSE) &10030045 (CSE) 11
  • 12. Market Information: Market Price Data: High, Low (based on the closing prices) andvolume during each month in last financial year, as under: Bombay Stock Exchange National Stock Exchange High (Rs.) Low (Rs.) Volume High (Rs.) Low (Rs.) VolumeApril 2010 1140.00 883.05 (No. of 159774 1147.00 885.00 (No. of 138329May 2010 1175.00 852.55 Shares) 183154 1119.80 860.40 Shares) 332284June 2010 956.00 801.00 494816 955.80 780.00 568426July 2010 927.00 806.00 214998 928.85 757.50 348569August 2010 875.50 772.40 58237 849.95 771.50 123404September 2010 910.00 771.30 104570 904.70 775.05 179309October 2010 970.00 610.20 605652 984.80 600.00 1087962November 2010 670.00 526.65 333608 760.00 536.00 531594December 2010 614.40 521.10 209396 609.00 520.00 178481January 2011 585.00 486.00 138216 584.00 490.10 180271February 2011 538.00 414.05 181306 539.90 423.00 138331March 2011 499.00 436.10 172904 511.00 432.00 241613Performance of Company’s Share PriceTheperformanceoftheCompany‟ssharepricesincomparisontobroad-basedindicesBSE500duringthefinancialyear2010-11,isasunder 12
  • 13. 2.5Major customer of trf Trf limited being a sister concer of TATA Enterprises, thus TATA STEEl limited andTATA power comprises one of the major customer group. Beside it, there are many othercustomer group in the market such as:-  TATA STEEL  BHEL  BHUSANSTEL LIMITE  ACC  STSTE ELECTRICTY BOARD  NTPC  NMDC  STEEL AUTHORITY OF INDIA LIMITED (SALE)  KOLKATA PORT TRUST  JINDAL STEEL LIMITED2.6Division wise product profile TRF manufactures and supplies bulk material handling, loading and un-loading; bulkmaterial processing, i.e., screening and crushing; and stacking, reclaiming and blending ofbulk materials. It also manufactures coke oven equipment (specially stamping-charging-pushing equipment), coal dust injection systems for blast furnaces and coal beneficiationsystems. The TMHS range includes: stockyard equipment, level luffing cranes, grab unloaders, ship loaders, gantry cranes, container cranes and special purpose cranes. This is allcustom-engineered for installation and use at ports, harbors‟, and metallurgical and otherprocesses industries. 13
  • 14. The product / equipment of the division comprise- 1) Conveyor component , idlers ,pulleys and accessories 2) Crushers - jaw crushers, impactors, roll crushers, ring granulators, ball mills, and hammer mills. 3) Screening equipment – mechanical vibrating screen, scalpers, slurry screens, foundry shakeouts. 4) Feeders- vibrating feeders, apron feeders, plough feeders, rotary table feeders. 5) Wagon tippler & side arm charger. 6) Wagon load 7) Shuttle conveyors 8) Belt & chain elevator(1) Conveyor components:Conveyor may be best described as equipment for conveying a definable shape such ascartoon, pallet or casting. The load is usually placed directly on the conveying surface is veryimportant.Conveyor pulleys: the pulleys, which support and direct and control its tension. Conveyor idlers: the idler‟s which form the support for the troughed carrying strand of thebest and the flats return stand.TRFs range of crushers includes jaw crushers, impactors, ring granulators, rollcrushers, cone crushers and rotary breakers. 14
  • 15. (2) Crushers: A crusher is a machine designed to reduce large rocks into smaller rocks, gravel, orrock dust. Crushers may be used to reduce the size, or change the form, of waste materials sothey can be more easily disposed of or recycled, or to reduce the size of a solid mix of rawmaterials (as in rock ore), so that pieces of different composition can be differentiated.Crushing is the process of transferring a force amplified by mechanical advantage through amaterial made of molecules that bond together more strongly, and resist deformation more,than those in the material being crushed do. Crushing devices hold material between twoparallel or tangent solid surfaces, and apply sufficient force to bring the surfaces together togenerate enough energy within the material being crushed so that its molecules separate from(fracturing), or change alignment in relation to (deformation), each other. The earliest crushers were hand-held stones,where the weight of the stone provided a boost to muscle power, used against a stone anvil.Querns and mortars are types of these crushing devices.Features Crushing ratio can be set at an extremely large value: normally at 20 and maximum up to 40 A high crushing efficiency reduces the power consumption Selective crushing can be made with ease The shape of crushed material will increasingly become cubic 15
  • 16. (3) SCREENING EQUIPMENT: Based on the knowledge that no two screening applications are identical, TRF Ltdoffers to its customers “screening solutions” and not just screens. The company uses its vistaof experience and technology for selecting, engineering and manufacturing the screens. Eachnew screen is then optimised for its motion, throw, speed and weight characteristics resultingin greater value to the customer. Moreover, the screens are customised to face the weathercalamities, through one of the basic vibratory motions – circular, elliptical or linear. This, ofcourse depends upon the application.(4) Feeders: TRF Limited manufactures Rotary Plough Feeders that provide a convenient means ofextracting raw materials from longitudinal slot bunkers and delivering it to a reclaim beltconveyor running underneath. A rotary plough feeder is a heavy-duty machine used to reclaimstored bulk materials. The feeder is designed to operate in a tunnel beneath a storage pile. Aslot opening, running along the length of the tunnel, allows the stored material to flow on to aprotruding reclaim shelf. The stored material is prevented from flowing over the edge of thereclaim shelf by designing the shelf to intercept the angle of repose. The plough feederconsists of a paddle wheel, called “rotor”, having six curved arms revolving on a vertical axisthat sweep the stored material from the shelf on to a belt conveyor. The plough mechanism istransported onto a heavy duty self propelled wheeled frame, called “carriage” that travels onrails mounted either on a canopy of the bunker or on the beams supported on the floor of thetunnel.The plough feeder can be continuously traversed or positioned at any point along the reclaimshelf for maximum flexibility. The speed of the rotor is adjustable so that the reclaim capacitycan be controlled to meet the capacity requirement. The self propelled carriage enables the 16
  • 17. rotary plough feeder to reclaim materials every along the entire length of the bunker. Theoutput capacity of the rotary plough feeder is controlled by varying the rotor speed. This canbe accomplished by variable speed drives to meet any specific requirement. Variable speeddrive can be electro mechanical like eddy current drive, frequency controller or hydraulicdrive. The machine can have local and remote control arrangement or both for operation.Types of rotary plough feeder: A) Single plough with single reclaim shelf – where lowcapacities are required, carriage moves on rails supported on the tunnel floor, and B) Singleplough with double reclaim shelves – where high capacities are required, carriage moves onrails supported on the tunnel floor.They are frequently used as feeders located material handling. Its application is found inalmost all sectors like power, steel, cement plant, etc. The apron feeder consists of one or moreendless chains to which overlapping pans are attached to form a continuous moving bed undercrushers and hoppers. Apron feeders can be installed in horizontal and inclined conditiondepending on the feeding zone of system layout. The apron feeders are broadly classified asApron Feeders is mechanical equipment widely used in bulk particularly suited for conveyingheavy duty raw materials such as coal, coke, ore, slag, rock, stone, gravel, clay, etc. Extra heavy duty apron feeder with crawler chain-sprocket assembly Extra heavy duty apron feeder with link-chain assembly Heavy duty apron feeder with link-chain assemblyFeatures Can be installed below wagon tippler hopper, stockpile and primary or secondary crushers Capacity and speed adjustment features Either hydraulic drive or electromechanical drive arrangement Horizontal as well as inclined installation Sealed bearings for feed rollers and returned rollers to avoid frequent lubrication Safety device: Mechanical / Electrical 17
  • 18. (5) Wagon tippler& side arm charger. The state-of-the-art Wagon Tipplers manufactured by TRF are in accordance with theIndian standards and the prescribed norms lay down by the statutory bodies. The wagontippler is designed to unload materials like coal, coke, iron ore, etc., from the open typerailway wagons, viz; Box/Box N HA/Box N MKD-II /OZ/O, etc. It is also capable ofperforming the function of weighing the gross and tare weight of wagons by incorporating anintegral weighbridge. TRF wagon tipplers are of sturdy construction and require negligiblemaintenance. The tippler is of latest design having main sectors carried on shafts supported onturning bearings. The wagon is clamped, automatically on the table during tippling and nohand adjustments are necessary. A wide range of wagons can be accommodated and theclamping arrangements are such that it is firmly held without damage or undue pressure onany part of the wagon. The machine is capable of automatically clamping (by hydraulicclamping) and tipping specified 8-wheeler bogie type broad gauge open wagons. The tipplerempties wagons above rail level and inverts them through a maximum angle of 160 degrees soas to discharge the material into the hopper. The tippler is a positive gear operated hydraulicdriven machine of massive and robust construction and designed for continuous and arduousduty. It is counter balanced at each stage of its operation. It carries the wagon with pin-jointedconnections between the components, thus giving an articulated construction. The sector gearis mounted on the periphery of end rings and driven by pinion mounted on line shaft poweredby gearbox and motor, etc. Special features: failsafe EM brake, hydraulic clamping system,maintenance free operation, and power pack)/electro-mechanical, side/end ring with gearteeth, tippler platform, brakes, counterweights, hydraulic clamping, main bearing and mainshaft. 18
  • 19. (6) Wagon loader: Frigate offers a sophisticated range of wagon loading machines for automatic loadingof filled bags in closed wagons. These machines for allow automatic loading and stacking ofbags and are made available in capacities up to 2400 bags/hr and are suitable for BCH, BCX& BCN (broad guage) railway wagons. These machines also allow single well as double sideloading. The common design principle of this equipment is the multi-section construction ofthe machine and the connection of the various sections via heavy-duty slewing gears. Thematerial receiving section (which is brought into the railcar), as well as theMaterial discharge end remaining outside of the car are both adjustable in height and bothpivot on a circular path and order to carry out various operation, these machines are equippedwith self contained drives called “drum motor”. Particular attention is paid to machine safetydevices and to the technical measures required for locking the various mobile components intoposition during long distance transport. 19
  • 20. (7) Shuttle conveyors: Load-out stamping scrap with even distribution A transversing, bidirectional steel belt conveyor is designed for final load-out of stamping scrap into large trailers or railcars.Continuous, back and forth, operation provides for even distribution into larger scrap containers where swivel chute systems would be inadequate. Features Automatic level sensors provide visual alert when full Access platforms with safety railings are standard, meeting OSHA requirements Shuttle conveyors utilized heavy-duty PRAB steel belting Frames are supported on hardened rail track and steel wheels (8) Belt& chain elevator: Belt Conveyors The company design and manufacture a broad line of belt conveyors that work in a variety of applications. These conveyors are primarily material handling equipment fabricated using high grade raw material and latest technology so that it can offer highly efficient and reliable range of these belt conveyors to their respected clients. Features Long working life Require less maintenance Easy operation 20
  • 21. High functionality Simple in constructionChain Elevators The company provides a comprehensive range of chain elevators, manufactured usingquality raw material and cutting-edge technology. These heavy chain elevators are highlyefficient and are available in varied sizes and can be customized as per the specifications laiddown by the clients. Low power consumption, durability, rugged construction, corrosionresistance and long service life are some of the features of the chain conveyors. These are alsospecially designed using superior quality raw material and cater to the needs of variousindustries.Features Highly durable Low cost Maintenance free Robust construction 21
  • 22. 3.1RESEARCH METHODOLOGY3.1.1Research Design: Research design is the conceptual structure within which research would be conducted.3.1.2Data Sources The research involved gathering Secondary data. Lot of data has been pooled from trf ltdto use in the study.1. Primary Data- Primary data is known as the data collected for the first time through fieldsurvey. Such data are collected with specific set of objectives to assess the current status ofany variable studied. Primary data always reveal the cross section picture of anything studied.2. Secondary Data- Secondary data refers to the information or facts already collected andpublished or unpublished. Such data are collected with the objective of understanding the paststatus of any variable. Or the data collected and reported by some source is accessed and usedfor the objective of a study. 22
  • 23. 3.2REVIEW OF LITERATURE Creating a positive consumer experience at the point of sale and post-sale. Acustomer-centric approach can add value to a company by enabling it to differentiate itselffrom competitors who do not offer the same experience3.2.1:6 C’s Of Customer-Centric It‟s impossible to talk about customer experience excellence without discussingcorporate culture. Firms can‟t sustain customer experience success unless itbecomes embedded within their core operating fabric. According to leadership guru ArthurF. Carazo: The ability to do more than expected does not come from influencing others to dosomething they are not committed to, but rather to nurture a culture that motivates and evenexcites individuals to do what is required for the benefit of all. Culture is an important, yet all too often under-appreciated, aspect of corporateperformance. That‟s why “Invest in culture as a corporate asset” is one of my six newmanagement imperatives. When it comes to great customer experience, organizations must develop aculture that I call customer-centric DNA, which is defined as:A strong, shared set of beliefs that guides how customers are treated.My research uncovered the following six components of customer-centric DNA: 1. Clear beliefs. The only way for an organization to operate consistently is if everyone understands what’s important. High performing organizations don’t leave this to chance; they create clear descriptions of their core values. But these aren’t just posters or slogans; they’re used as guideposts for hiring, firing, and promoting employees. 2. Constant communications. When a company goes through a major transformation, which is true for most firms in the midst of a customer experience journey, it’s important for employees to continuously hear what’s going on. Leading firms develop explicit internal 23
  • 24. communications plans to make sure that employees are kept up to date on the priorities and progress of these efforts. 3. Collective celebrations. Organizations celebrate when individuals or groups outperform metrics for sales growth or profitability. In customer-centric cultures, companies generate the same excitement around customer experience success. These firms create customer experience metrics and use public acknowledgements and incentives to reward employees for exceeding those goals. (See law #5 of customer experience: Employees do what is measured, incented, and celebrated). 4. Compelling stories. The author Philip Pullman was quoted as saying “‘Thou shalt not’ is soon forgotten, but ‘Once upon a time’ lasts forever.” Stories play a powerful key role in shaping the culture of any firm. Companies use stories to tell how founders or employees have helped customers, demonstrating customer-centric behaviors that are valued by the organization. 5. Commitment to employees. There’s no way to deliver great customer experience if employees aren’t on board. But you can’t just “expect” employees to do what’s right. Companies need to help employees better serve customers with investments in training and enabling tools. Leading companies also provide incentives and perks that create highly- desirable work environments. (See law #4 of customer experience: Unengaged employees don’t create engaged customers).3.3Customer Centric Business (Plan) Success Planning to how to find and service your customers and make money while you do it.Five Business Plan Key Factors that you need to cover in any business plan. In this paper welook at why these are important from the customer centric view.1. Goals2. Product 24
  • 25. 3. Market4. People,5. Finance/Cash flowWhy are these important?1. Goals.Start with the end in mind. Unless you know what you are trying to achieve then it isimpossible to plan for, difficult to measure and you may never know when you have achievedyou original goals. Everything in your business should be then thought about in terms of howit helps you reach your goals.2. Productwhy will people buy your product?What will it do for them- what‟s their benefit?How do you measure this benefit in terms of value to them?What portion of that value can you charge as a price?How does the product differentiate itself from the current products on the market (what is itsUnique Selling Point? (USP).How do you make your USP sustainable?3. Marketwho will buy your product?What is their demographic?What is their geography?How will you identify them?How will you communicate with/target them?How big is this market?4. Peoplean “A” class team with a “B” class product will always succeed over a “B” class team with an“A” class product.People are you most important asset- what roles do you need to fill to make sure you canfulfill your plans under points 1 to 5? 25
  • 26. 5. Finance/Cash flowCFIMITYM (Cash Flow Is More Important Than your Mother)Business failure is due to lack of money – nothing else.Cash-flow is driven by Sales- Sales is driven by paying customers. Paying customers aregenerally satisfied customers, which is driven by product quality and service.3.4Customer Centric Marketing Generates New Business Leads Customer centric marketing although less espoused, is the ideal marketing approachfor small business seeking to generate B2B leads. Customer centric marketing is as its namesays, it centres‟ on the needs and wants of the customer, and not about what the person doingthe selling wants you to buy. Customer centric marketing focuses on understanding the problems, concerns, needsand wants of your customer not yours. It assumes nothing and seeks to gain insight into theconcerns of your potential customer, leading to a mutually beneficial business relationshipand a well-satisfied customer. It recognizes the sale is the natural result of forging a solidrelationship built on listening and problem solving, not forcing someone to buy. It beginswith building customer rapport and ends with a lasting business relationship. People often confuse the method used to deliver a marketing message with a type ofmarketing. Many people equate telemarketing, direct mail, print advertising, radio, TV,public relations, seminars, newsletters, audio and video presentations, email, and asmarketing. These are not marketing approaches they are delivery methods used to distributemarketing messages. People can and do use all of these delivery methods to send varioustypes of marketing messages. You can send a capabilities/capacities message, aconsultative/informative message or a customer-centric message using any of these deliverymethods. 26
  • 27. The key to successful B2B small business marketing is not about how you deliver themarketing message, it is all about the marketing message you deliver, to the right audience, atthe right time. We call delivering the right message to the right audience at the right timeachieving "B2B marketing message alignment". Understanding the differences between and among marketing approaches,(capabilities/capacities, consultative/informative, or customer centric), the application of theappropriate approach to your target audience, (B2C or B2B), and a multi-layered approach toutilizing delivery methods all at the proper time is the formula for marketing success. That iswhy we say Customer Centric Marketing is the best kept secret to generate B2B sales leads.3.5Customer Centric Marketing Benefits to You: Selling becomes effortless because there is no sales pitch. You simply offer to help aperson become more successful and by doing so you benefit too. 1. Enjoy increased referrals the best form of marketing and least expensive 2. Reach prospects before they have begun to seek solutions from others 3. Eliminate wasting marketing dollars on ineffective marketing approaches 4. Pre-qualified prospects actually call you 5. Earn profits not response rates. Quality not quantity is the way to a profitable ROI on your marketing investment. One hundred responses and no sales = $0.00 profits. Ten responses and three sales is money in the bank.Customer centric marketing is essential to small business if your goal is to achieve highquality B2B sales leads and marketing success at the lowest ROI. 27
  • 28. 3.5Customer Management Services Based on the foundation of a Customer Centric Hub, a repository is built to synchronizescattered customer information from legacy systems to provide you with the intelligence fromeffective campaign management that enhances customer life time value.You can select from a whole suite of services to meet your needs - customer databasecreation and building, membership management, CRM, campaign management and serviceactivities such as fulfillment and customer hotline services.3.6Customer benefits 1. Improvement to customer service quality driven by a single view of customer and comprehensive customer profiles 2. Facilitate utilization of resources for marketing and sales activities in a more cost-effective way 3. Increase enterprise revenue through exploration of new business opportunities and marketing retention programs 4. Streamline internal workflows of an enterprise, thereby uplifting efficiency 5. Enable enterprise customers to experience a more personalized service 28
  • 29. 4.1 IntroductionThe data for the research has been collected using internet questionnaire. Thequestionnairewas distributed randomly to a sample of employees, over 70 employees who were working invarious departments, with different job responsibilities and organization position.4.2 Data AnalysisAfter collecting the filled questionnaire, they were analyzed for presentation of researchfindings under data analysis1. How long have you worked with the present organization : Age Group No. of Respondents Percentage Less than 1 year 5 9.43 1-3 years 15 28.30 3.-5 years 12 22.64 5-10 years 21 39.62 Total 53 100 Table No.1 - How long have you worked with the present organization 29
  • 30. Figure No.3 - Employment DurationInterpretation- The research was directed to find information on the duration of service theemployee has been with the organization. Survey results indicated that highest number of 21(40.4%) respondents had been working between 5-10 years and this followed by 15respondents (28.8%) who have been with the organization between 1- 3 years. Respondentswho have been working for the shortest period of time less than 1 year stood with 5respondents (7.7%). 30
  • 31. 2. State the department you work in. Departments No. of Respondents Percentage Finance and Accounting 2 3.77 Human Resource Management 9 16.98 Information Technology 2 3.77 Manufacturing 5 9.43 Research and Development 11 20.75 Sales and Marketing 7 13.20 Other (please specify) 17 32.07 Total 53 100 Table No.2 - State the department you work inRegarding the inquiry on the nature of work performed by the respondents, a highest numberof 11 respondents (30.6%) were engaged in Research and Development. With 9 respondents(25%) came next for Human Resource Management. Closely following these respondents inother area have given their approval to proceed further:  Sales and Marketing = 7 (19.4%)  Manufacturing = 5 (13.9%)  IT and Finance & Accounting = 2 (5.60%) 31
  • 32. Figure No.4 - Nature of Work 32
  • 33. 3. Describe your job responsibilityOperative Employee 33Supervisor 13Manager 5Senior Management 1 Table No.3 - Describe your job responsibilityInterpretation- The research inquired to find the nature of jobs of respondents. The researchshowed that highest number 33 respondents (63.50%) were engaged in operative employeerelated job responsibilities and this closely followed by 13 respondents (25.58%). These werefollowed next by :  Manager = 5 (9.6%)  Senior Management = 1 (1.9%) 33
  • 34. Figure No.5 - Job Description 34
  • 35. 4. Which of the following aptly describes your satisfaction level with the presentorganization? Very Satisfied 6 Satisfied 32 Neutral 10 Dissatisfied 4 Very Dissatisfied 1 Table No.4 - Which of the following aptly describes your satisfaction level with the present organization?The research was directed to find how satisfied the respondents are with their presentorganization and results collected indicated the following:  Very Satisfied = 6 (11.5%)  Satisfied = 32 (61.5%)  Neutral = 10 (19.2%)  Dissatisfied = 4 (7.7%)  Very Dissatisfied = 1 (1.9%) 35
  • 36. Figure No.6 - Satisfaction level-Employee Evaluation 36
  • 37. 5. Inform about your supervisor / manager Perceptions Strongl Somewha Neutra Disagree y t l Agree Agree My supervisor listens to me 20 24 7 2 My supervisor is knowledgeable 17 25 8 3 about my work My supervisor is fair 12 23 16 2 My supervisor supports personal 11 27 13 1 Development My supervisor has realistic 10 26 13 4 expectations regarding my work Table No.5 - Inform about your supervisor / managerAn inquiry was made to know what kind of perceptions the employees have about theirsupervisor and manager. Results indicated the following:Listens to employees  Positive Agreement = 44 (83.02%)  Neutral = 7 (13.21%)  Disagreed = 2 (3.77%)Have knowledge about employee‟s work  Positive Agreement = 42 (79.25%)  Neutral = 8 (15.09%) 37
  • 38.  Disagreed = 2 (3.77%)Being fair to employees  Positive Agreement = 35 (66.04%)  Neutral = 16 (30.19%)  Disagreed = 2 (3.77%)Support personal development  Positive Agreement = 38 (71.70%)  Neutral = 13 (24.53%)  Disagreed = 1 (1.89%)Has realistic expectation of employee contribution  Positive Agreement = 36 (67.92%)  Neutral = 13 (24.53%)  Disagreed = 4 (7.55%) 38
  • 39. Figure No.7 - Supervisor / Manager Perception 39
  • 40. 6. Rate your satisfaction with your overall management Perceptions Very Good Neutra Bad Good l Your relationship with your boss 16 26 11 1 Your boss/supervisors management 11 26 15 1 abilities Communication with general management 11 13 24 5 Recognition from management 5 18 22 8 Career development support from your 5 19 22 7 supervisor or management Table No.6 - Rate your satisfaction with your overall managementAn inquiry was made to know whether the employees are fully satisfied with their currentmanagement. Results indicated the following:Relationship with boss  Very Good = 16 (29.63%)  Good = 26 (48.15%)  Neutral = 11 (20.37%)  Bad = 1 (1.85%)Boss‟s / Supervisor‟s management abilities  Very Good = 11 (20.37%)  Good = 26 (48.15%)  Neutral = 15 (27.78%)  Bad = 1 (1.89%)Communication with general management 40
  • 41.  Very Good = 11 (20.37%)  Good = 13 (24.07%)  Neutral = 24 (44.44%)  Bad = 5 (9.26%)Recognition from management  Very Good = 5 (9.26%)  Good = 18 (33.33%)  Neutral = 22 (40.74%)  Bad = 8 (14.81%)Career development support from supervisor/management  Very Good = 5 (9.26%)  Good = 19 (35.19%)  Neutral = 22 (40.74%)  Bad = 7 (12.96%) 41
  • 42. Figure No.8 - Satisfaction Level- Overall Management 42
  • 43. 7. State your satisfaction level with your supervisor, manager or management for response tosuggestions proposed by you. Very Satisfied 5 Satisfied 29 Neutral 13 Dissatisfied 4 Very Dissatisfied 1 Table No.7 - State your satisfaction level with your supervisor, manager or management for response to suggestions proposed by you.Inquiry on the satisfaction levels of employees to suggestions they propose to supervisor,manager and the management indicated that satisfaction registered with 29 respondents(55.8%) which is higher than employees expressing neutral with 13 respondents (25.0%) and5 respondents (9.6%) were very satisfied employees and 4 respondents were dissatisfiedemployees. In this case, the highest respondents were registered by the satisfactionsemployees which is very good indication. 43
  • 44. Figure No.9 - Satisfaction Level on Proposed Suggestion. 44
  • 45. 8. How would you rate your job satisfaction? Perceptions Satisfactor Very Unsatisfactor Very y Satisfactor y Unsatisfactor y y Recognition for your 30 11 8 3 hard work Development 25 4 18 6 opportunities available Your pay level as 25 6 11 11 compared to similar position in the industry Your performance 24 6 20 3 feedback from management Table No.8 - How would you rate your job satisfaction?With reference to job satisfaction in terms of the level of recognition employees 30respondents (56.60%) were satisfied as against 8 respondents (15.09%) who were notpresently satisfied with their work. 45
  • 46. Figure No.10 - Job Satisfaction 46
  • 47. 9. How satisfied are you with the level of training and development received? Perceptions Satisfactor Very Unsatisfactor Very y Satisfactor y Unsatisfactor y y Initial training received 26 6 14 7 when hired Ongoing training 19 11 13 9 necessary to perform your job well Self development support 18 8 18 7 Preparation for career 15 6 15 14 advancement Table No.9 - How satisfied are you with the level of training and development received?Whether the levels of training employees receive supports in the development of job handlingwas inquired into and the response indicates the following. In respect of initial training anddevelopment which employees receive 32 respondents (59.26%) expressed satisfied while 21respondents (38.89%) expressed dissatisfaction.As regard the ongoing training, 31 respondents (57.41%) expressed satisfied while 22respondents (40.74%) expressed dissatisfied 47
  • 48. Figure No.11 - Training & Development-Satisfaction Level 48
  • 49. 10. Job Knowledge among work force Perceptions Strongly Somewhat Neutral Disagree Agree Agree Workforce has job-relevant 8 27 15 2 knowledge/skills necessary for successful task completion Table No.10 - Job Knowledge among work forceInformation was also sought to find out whether the workforce around the employee has job-relevant knowledge and skills. Results obtained indicated that 35 employees stated in positiveagreement and this contrasts with 2 employees who disagreed the workforce is capable ofperforming given tasks. 15 respondents were neutral being unable to agree or disagree to thestated inquiry. 49
  • 50. Figure No.12 - Job Knowledge among work force 50
  • 51. 11. Employee Skills Development Perceptions Strongl Somewhat Neutra Disagre y Agree l e Agree Opportunities are given to improve my 8 20 18 6 skills for the job Supervisors/Team Leaders support 7 21 18 6 employee‟s development Management imitates efforts to improve 6 19 20 7 training on underperformers in my department Table No.11 - Employee Skills DevelopmentInformation on whether the workforce is given opportunity to improve their job skills resultsobtained indicated 28 employees (51.85%) were satisfied with agreement and against this alow number of 6 respondents (11.11%) disagreed to the issue and 18 respondents were unableto confirm their opinion either positively or negatively. 51
  • 52. Figure No.13 - Employee Skills Development 52
  • 53. 12. Employee Development Support. Perceptions strongly Somewhat Neutral Disagree Agree Agree Supervisors/ Team Leaders in my work 5 29 13 6 support employee development Table No.12 - Employee Development Support34 respondents (62.96%) positively stated their satisfaction but against this only 6respondents (11.11%) expressed their disagreement. While 13 respondents (24.07%) wereneutral being unable agree or disagree positively. 53
  • 54. Figure No.14 - Supervisor / Team leader supportTo the inquiry whether the supervisor / team leader offer valuable information on howincrease productivity. Results obtained indicated that 34 respondents (62.96%) were in strong/ somewhat agreement compared to 6 respondents (11.11%) who disagreed that management,supervisor and team leader offer great desired level of support. 13 respondents (24.07%) wereunable to voice their convictions either positively or negatively. 54
  • 55. 13. Right Use of Employee Talent Perceptions Strongly Somewhat Neutral Neutral Agree Agree Disagree Organization uses my talent in the 9 23 17 4 workplace Table No.13 – Right Use of Employee TalentTo the inquiry whether the organization is making use of employee‟s talent an overwhelming32 respondents (60.38%) expressed in positive agreement while only 4 respondents (7.55%)expressed their disagreements implying the employee has various other talents but themanagement is not allowing him or her to initiate. 55
  • 56. Figure No.15 - Use of Talent by Organization 56
  • 57. 14. Employee Performance Appraisals and Performance Expectation Understanding. Perceptions Strongl Somewha Neutra Disagre y t l e Agree Agree In my most recent performance appraisal, I 7 26 15 4 understood what I had to do to be rated at different performance level (for example fully successful, Outstanding) Table No.14 - Employee Performance Appraisals and Performance Expectation UnderstandingWhether the employees are able to understand performance appraisals which the organizationis carrying out every now and then, 33 respondents (61.11%) replied positively that they areable to fully understand what the appraisals demand or expect from them. Only 4 respondents(7.41%) denied that employees are able to understand them and to expect them to offerwholehearted collaborations to other employees. 57
  • 58. Figure No.16 - Employee Performance Appraisal & Performance Expectation Understanding 58
  • 59. 15. Respondents Classification According to the Age Age Group Below 30 30-40 40-50 50-60 Total No. of O 16 24 13 53Respondent Percentage 0 30.18 45.28 24.52 100 Table No.15- Respondents Classification According to the AgeShows that most of the respondents are in the age group of 40-50 and 45.28% of therespondents are in the age group of 30-40 and 50-60 respectively. 59
  • 60. 120100 80 60 NO. Of respondent percentage 40 20 0 below 30 30-40 40-50 50-60 totle 60
  • 61. 5.1 FINDINGRelationship with boss had registered as Good by 26 respondents (48.15%) as against only 1respondents who registered Bad relationship. This indicates that the boss has very goodrelationship with employees all the issues which concerns by the employees directly raised totop management or the boss solve the situations and keep a good improvement andrelationship with employees.26 respondents (48.15%) were of the belief that Boss‟s / Supervisor‟s management abilitiesas being Good and this is a very good indication. It shows that employees totally trusting andrespecting decisions of the top management.Communication with boss / management also, registered good with 24 respondents (44.44%)as against only 5 respondents (9.26%) who registeredBad in communication. This is a good indication with high good communication between theboss and the employees.Recognition from management was registered well with 23 respondents (42.59%) which is agood sign. Employees would become proud that their efforts are being recognized. They willget more of interest in their jobs and keep trying to do more and more efforts.Career Development support from Supervisor / Management was also, listedAs Good with 24 respondents (44.45%). 61
  • 62. 5.2 SUGGESTIONIn view of the analysis and with the change in industrial scenario it is felt that a companymust reorient its policies for betterment. TRF produces Bulk material handling equipmentproduct and now a days there is tough competition in the market of Bulk material handlingequipment. Hence company needs certain best policies for competition with its competitor indomestic as well as global market.In brief the following suggestions are:-  Company use perpetual inventory, which is very costly. Hence the company should use both perpetual and periodic inventory.  Besides automatic procurement items there is no specific system for calculating reorder level, minimum and maximum level. A proper system for different items should be developed.  Lead time for receipt of stores and spare items is around 6 months, which is very high. The lead time should be brought down by decreasing the time duration in paper work.  As understand from the explanation of the management, there is huge volume of non- moving and obsolete stores and spare items which are yet to be disposed of. 62
  • 63. 5.3 CONCLUSIONS It is clear from the study that the customer centric has direct impact on Productivityand growth. A highly motivated employee invests his / her best Efforts in carrying out eachand every element of his / her duties and responsibilities. Enhanced job performances of theemployee will add value to the organization itself and to the employee‟s productivity. Theempirical results of this study show that the motivation of the employee has advantages to theemployee and the organization and the organization will keep the loyalty of the employee atthe high peak. Also, the employee will trust his / her organization, supervisor and topmanagement. Form these observations of facts it is very clear that business organizations cansurvive and grow by taking care of their employees. In the free market economy undertodays globalization only organizations which pursue high-performance focused on theiremployees can survive and growth rapidly and safely. 63
  • 64. BIBLIOGRAPHY1. “Human Resource Management” by L.M. Prasad.2. “Personal Management” by Aswathapa.3. “Research Methodology” by C. Kothari.4. WEBSITES: www.trfltd.co.in , http://www.trf.co.in/ www.google.co.in 64
  • 65. Appendix1. How long have you worked in the present organization: o Less than 1 year o 1-3 years o 3-5 years o 5-10 years2. State the department you work in o Finance and Accounting o Human Resource Management o Information Technology o Manufacturing o Research and Development o Sales and Marketing Other (please specify) ……………………………3. Describe your job Responsibility? o Operative Employee o Supervisor o Manager o Senior Management 65
  • 66. 4. Which of the following aptly describes your satisfaction level with thepresent organization? o Very Satisfied o Satisfied o Neutral o Dissatisfied o Very Dissatisfied5. Inform about your supervisor / manager? o My supervisor listen to me o My supervisor is knowledgeable about my work o My supervisor is fair o My supervisor supports personal development o My supervisor has realistic expectations regarding my work6. Rate your satisfaction with your overall management? o Very Good o Good o Bad o Very Bad 66
  • 67. 7. State your satisfaction with your supervisor, manager or management forresponse to suggestions proposed by you? o Very Satisfied o Satisfied o Neutral o Dissatisfied o Very Dissatisfied8. How would you rate your job satisfaction? o Recognition for your hard work o Development opportunities available o Your pay level as compared to similar position in the industry o Your performance feedback from management9. How satisfied are you with the level of training and development received? o Initial training received when hired o Ongoing training necessary to perform your job well o Self development support o Preparation for career advancement 67
  • 68. 10. Job knowledge among work force? o Strongly Agree o Somewhat Agree o Neutral o Disagree11. Employee skills development? o Opportunities are given to improve my skills for the job o Supervisors/Team Leaders support employee’s development o Management initiates efforts to improve training to underperformers in my departments12. Employee development support? o Strongly Agree o Somewhat Agree o Neutral o Disagree 68
  • 69. 13. Right use of employee talent? o Strongly Agree o Somewhat Agree o Neutral o Neutral Disagree14. Employee Performance Appraisal and Performance ExpectationUnderstanding? o Strongly Agree o Somewhat Agree o Neutral o Disagree15. Respondent‟s classification according to age? o Below 30 o 30-40 o 40-50 o 50-60 69

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