CO-OPERATIVE BANKING IN INDIA - AN OVERVIEWIn the previous chapter, we have reviewed the available literature oncooperativ...
federal organisations of primary co-operative credit societieswere left out. This lacuna was bridged by the Co-operativeSo...
grain banks are actively functioning as primary societies incertain states. Though the organisation of central and stateco...
3.4 Primary Agricultural Credit Societies in IndiaIn India, PACS are passing through an era of crisis.Increasing incidence...
3.5 Primary Agricultural Credit Societies in KeralaThe comparative performance of PACS in Kerala with respect totheir coun...
these primary societies form a federation for ensuringrational use of their funds and provide a common place to meetfor ex...
should not be given registration under the Co-operativeSocieties Act. Hence, no such banks exist in our countryat present....
marketing societies for marketing operations, industrialsocieties for supply operations and other societies forworking exp...
Societies Act 1913, The Travancore Co-operative Societies Act1914 and the Madras Co-operative Societies Act 1932respective...
from RBI and the National Bank for Agriculture and RuralDevelopment are invariably routed through them. Table 3.5presents ...
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Co operative

  1. 1. CO-OPERATIVE BANKING IN INDIA - AN OVERVIEWIn the previous chapter, we have reviewed the available literature oncooperative banking. In continuation of that, in this chapter, an attempt is madeto review the developments in co-operative banking in India in general and thatof Kerala in particular. This is considered essential for getting aclear picture of the background in which the DCBs are workingand for their evaluation later.3.1 OriginThe history of co-operative movement in India is about acentury old. The movement was started in India with a view toencourage and promote thrift and mutual help for thedevelopment of persons of small means such as agriculturists,artisans and other segments of the society. It was also aimedat concentrating the efforts in releasing the exploitedclasses out of the clutches of the money lenders. Keepingthis as one of the objectives, credit societies were formedunder Co-operative Societies Act of 1904.The 1904 Act was largely based on the Eng_ish FriendlySocieties Act, 1896 .Under this Act, only primary creditI societies were permitted to register and non-credit and
  2. 2. federal organisations of primary co-operative credit societieswere left out. This lacuna was bridged by the Co-operativeSocieties Act, 1912. This Act paved the way for theorganisation of central co-operative banks throughout thecountry. But the provisions of 1912 Act were inadequate tomeet the requirements of those states where co-operativemovement had made considerable progress. Bombay, the pioneersin this regard passed a new Act, viz., the Bombay Co-operativeSocieties Act, 1925 for serving the many sided development ofthe state. Later on, Madras, Bihar and Bengal passed theirown Acts in 1932, 1935 and 1940 respectively.3.2 Structure of Co-operative Banking in IndiaIndias co-operative banking structure consists of twomain segments, viz., agricultural and non-agricultural credit.There are two separate structures in the case of agriculturalcredit - one for short and medium term credit and the otherfor long term credit. The co-operative credit structure forshort and medium terms is a three tier one with primaryagricultural credit societies at the base level, the centralco-operative bank at the district level and state co-operativebank at the apex level. Over and above these institutions,
  3. 3. grain banks are actively functioning as primary societies incertain states. Though the organisation of central and stateco-operative banks was mainly for the benefit of theagricultural credit sector, they serve non-agriculturalsocieties too.3.3 Primary Agricultural Credit SocietiesPrimary Agricultural Credit Societies (PACS) are thefoundation of the co-operative credit structure and form thelargest number of co-operative institutions in India. Most ofthese societies have been organised mainly to provide creditfacilities and to inculcate the habit of thrift and economyamong their members.The share capital of a society is divided into units,called shares, contributed by the members. The most importantsource of finance of PACS is members deposits. Borrowingsconstitute the most important element of their workingcapital. The criteria for borrowings differ from state.tostate according to their liability. Punctuality in therepayment of loans has hardly been observed by the memberswith the result that there has been a steep rise in the amountofoverdues all over the country.
  4. 4. 3.4 Primary Agricultural Credit Societies in IndiaIn India, PACS are passing through an era of crisis.Increasing incidence of non-viability is one of the major setbacks. PACS have made little progress in attracting deposits.In majority of the cases, the deposits were collected throughbook adjustments by carving certain portion of loan amount.The repaying capacity of the PACS has been dwindledconsiderably, as a result mounted overdues in the loanoutstanding against members. Alongwith the increasing volumeof business the number of PACS running into loss and theamount of loss have increased considerably over the years.The important reasons for this situation are, existence ofnon-viable and dormant societies, uneven growth ofagricultural credit movement, inadequacy of the quantum ofloan supplied by them, defective loan policies, delay in loandisbursement, inadequate supervision and defective audit, nolinking of credit with marketing, high overdues, ineffectivemanagement, neglect of small farmers and domination of vestedinterests. Salient data of PACS in India from 1975-76 to1990-91 is given in table 3.1.
  5. 5. 3.5 Primary Agricultural Credit Societies in KeralaThe comparative performance of PACS in Kerala with respect totheir counterparts in the rest of the country is remarkable.Kerala had the highest rank (1987-88) with regard to membership,population coverage, borrowing members, loans and advances,deposits mobilisation and share capital contribution (Suresh, K.A.andVinaikumar, E., 1993. p.43). The rank with regard topercentage of overdue to demand was lowest during this period.The progress of PACS in Kerala for the period 1970-71 to 1991-92is explained in table 3.2.3.6 District Co-operative Banks in IndiaDistrict Co-operative Banks (DCBs) occupy the middlelevel position in the three tier co-operative credit structureof the country. In the beginning of the formation of PACSs,52they could not function effectively without gaining financialsupport from an outside agency. Over and above this, theywere in need of technical guidance and administrative support.At the same time, there were some societies which have gainedstrengthand possessurplus funds as well as talents. As aprecondition to get mutual help it became necessary that all
  6. 6. these primary societies form a federation for ensuringrational use of their funds and provide a common place to meetfor exchange of ideas and co-operative experience. Theformationof DCBs was thus a felt need for mutual help.The Co-operative Societies Act of 1912 permitted theregistration of DCBs. Even before the enactment of this Act,some DCBs were established to cater to the needs of primarysocieties. In 1906, forerunner of the first DCB wasestablished as a primary society in Uttar Pradesh. At Ajmerin Rajasthan the first DCB was established in 1910. But thefirstfull fledged DCB as per the provisions of the Act of1912 was started in Jabalpur District of the Central Province.As recommended by Maclagan Committee (1915) DCBs in Indiawere classified into, (Nakkiran, S., 1980, p.162).1. Banks whose membership is confined to individuals - Theseare banks wherein membership consists entirely ofindividuals or in which societies are admitted asshareholders on exactly the same footings as individuals,without any special provision for their adequaterepresentation on the board of management. The MaclaganCommittee was of the opinion that these type of banks
  7. 7. should not be given registration under the Co-operativeSocieties Act. Hence, no such banks exist in our countryat present.2. Banking Unions wherein only primary societies areallowed to become members under this category. As theshareholders, lenders and borrowers are the same, theclash of interest between the shareholders and borrowingsocieties can be eliminated.3. Banks with individuals and societies as members, certainportion of shares are assigned to societies and alsohave separate representation in the board ofdirectors. This category is considered to be better asit provides a combination of both rural and urbanpopulation. Majority portion of the DCBs in India are ofthis type.The DCBs are formed mainly with the objective of meetingthe credit requirements of member societies. As aninstitution for helping the societies in times of need, theyfinance agricultural credit societies for production purposes,
  8. 8. marketing societies for marketing operations, industrialsocieties for supply operations and other societies forworking expenses. In short, the major objectives of the DCBsare to provide loans to affiliated societies, to act as abalancing centre of finance for primary societies, to arrangefor the supervision and control of the affiliated societies,to raise deposits from members and non-members, to conveneconferencesof the member societies and also prescribe uniformprocedure for the working of primary societies, to openbranches of the bank at important places with the permissionof the Registrar of Co-operative Societies and to maintain andutilise state partnership. Generally, the area of operation ofa DCB is limited to one district. Progress of DCBsin India isexhibited in table 3.3.3.7 District Co-operative Banks in KeralaThe DCBs in Kerala have a history of about 80 years.They were organised separately in the erstwhile states -Travancore and Cochin and in the Malabar district of theMadras Presidency before the re-organisation of the states onlinguistic basis in 1956. There were separate Co-operativeSocieties Act for these regions, viz., the Cochin Co-operative
  9. 9. Societies Act 1913, The Travancore Co-operative Societies Act1914 and the Madras Co-operative Societies Act 1932respectively. In 1949, The Travancore-Cochin State was formedby amalgamating Travancore and Cochin States. For this newstate, The Travancore-Cochin Co-operative Societies Act waspassed in 1952. These legislations were in force in theKerala state till the enactment of the Kerala Co-operativeSocieties Act 1969.The Kerala Co-operative Societies Act, 1969 came intoforce on 15.5.1969 and the preamble states it as an "Act toconsolidate, amend and unify the law relating to Co-operativeSocieties in the State of Kerala" (Government of Kerala,1969. p.1). The progress of DCBs in Kerala is exhibited intable 3.4.3.8 State Co-operative Banks in IndiaThe State Co-operative Banks (SCBs) or the apex banksoccupy a crucial position in the three tier co-operativecredit structure in India. These apex banks or StateCo-operative Banks are formed by federating DCBs in eachstate. The apex banks assume a key-position in theco-operative credit structure because the financial assistance
  10. 10. from RBI and the National Bank for Agriculture and RuralDevelopment are invariably routed through them. Table 3.5presents the key statistics relating to SCBs in India for theperiod 1975-76 to 1990-91.3.9 State Co-operative Bank in KeralaThe Kerala State Co-operative Bank (KSCB) was initiallyregistered as the Travancore Central Co-operative Bank on 23rdNovember 1915. In 1954 the bank was transformed as theTravancore Cochin State Co-operative Bank and on November 1st,1956 the bank was reorganised as the Kerala State Co-operativeBank Ltd. It is the first State Co-operative Bank to beincluded in the second schedule of the Reserve Bank of IndiaAct, licenced to carry on the organised business in banking.The bank has built a highly organised network consisting of 14DCBs and 1581 PACSs functioning at the village level (on31.3.92). This wide, network has enabled the DistrictCo-operative Banks to reach the weaker sections and the commonman in the rural areas in Kerala. Progress of KSCB for theperiod 1970-71 to 1991-92 is displayed in Table 3.6.

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