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  • 1. EXPORT PROCEDURE & DOCUMENTATION VIVA College S.Y.B.M.S ROLL NO. 61to70
  • 2. INDEXSERIAL CONTENT PAGENUMBER NUMBER 1 INTRODUCTION 2 FLOW CHART 3 EXPORT DOCUMENTS 4 COMMERCIAL DOCUMENTS 5 COMMERCIAL INVOICE 6 Certificate of Origin: 7 Bill of Lading 8
  • 3. INTRODUCTION India has a mission to capture 2% of the global share of trade by 2010, up fromthe present level of less than 1%. Export is one of the lucrative business activities in India. Thegovernment also provides various promotional schemes to the exporters for earning valuableforeign exchange for the country and for meeting their requirements for importing moderntechnology and essential inputs. Besides, the income from export business is also exempted tothe specified extent under the Income Tax Act, 1961, Refund of Central Excise and Custom Dutyon export is also made under the Duty Drawback Scheme of the Government. There is no SalesTax on products meant for exports. Exports can be of goods which can be moved physically from one country toanother or can be of service rendered. Detailed list of services are given in the Foreign TradePolicy covering more than 160 items e.g. Insurance, Hospital, Postal and Telecommunicationetc.TWO CLASSES OF EXPORTS: Physical Exports: If the goods physically go out of the country or services arerendered outside the country then it is called as physical export. Deemed Exports: Where thegoods do not go out of the country physically they can be termed as deemed exports. This will besubject to certain conditions as prescribed by the DGFT. Under Deemed Exports, the goods maybe supplied to the manufacturer exporter who ultimately export a finished product of which thissupply forms a part and ultimately go out of the country. E.g. Supply of fabrics to the garmentexporter who exports the garments made out of the said fabric. The government may announce from time to time the types of supplies that maybe considered as deemed export. The Foreign Trade Policy gives the list of supplies consideredunder the Deemed Export Category. The policies and procedures are different for PhysicalExports and Deemed Exports as also the benefits available. In a nutshell, Deemed Exports do not
  • 4. enjoy all the benefits that are available under Physical Export. The Foreign Trade defines exportsas taking out of India any goods by land, sea, air. Although the act does not term them as“Physical Exports”, we have to put phrase to distinguish it from “Deemed Exports” which issales in India but considered as exports for limited purpose.TYPES OF EXPORTERS: Exporters can be basically classified into two groups Manufacturer Exporter: As the exporter has the facility to manufacturer the product he intends to export and hence he exports the products manufactured by him. Merchant Exporter: An exporter who does not have the facility to manufacture an item. But, he procures the same from other manufacturers or from the market and exports the same. An exporter can be both a manufacturer exporter as well as a merchant exporter,he can export product manufactured by him or he can export items bought from the market. Once it is decided to export, it is mandatory on your part to follow certainprocedures, rules and regulations as prescribed by various regulatory authorities such as DGFT,RBI, and Customs. These procedures, rules and regulations are laid down in the Exim Policy2004-09, Exchange Control Manual, Customs Act etc. Accordingly Export documents arerequired to be prepared keeping in view of the requirement of the foreign buyers and ourregulatory authorities.
  • 5. EXPORT DOCUMENTSAny export shipment involved various documents required by various authorities such ascustoms, excise, RBI, Inspection and according depending upon the requirements, there arecategorized into 2 categories, namely commercial documents and regulatory documents. A. Commercial Documents. : - Commercial documents are required for effecting physical transfer of goods and their title from the exporter to the importer and the realisation of export sale proceeds. Out of the 16 commercial documents in the export documentation framework as many as 14 have been standardised and aligned to one another. These are proforma invoice, commercial invoice, packing list, shipping instructions, intimation for inspection, certificate, of inspection of quality control, insurance declaration, certificate of insurance, mates receipt, bill of lading or combined transport document, application for certificate origin, certificate of origin, shipment advice and letter to the bank for collection or negotiation of documents. However, shipping order and bill of exchange could not be brought within the fold of the Aligned Documentation System,1. Commercial Invoice: Commercial invoice is an important and basic export document. It is also known as a Document of Contents as it contains all the information required for the preparation of other documents. It is actually a sellers bill of merchandise. It is prepared by the exporter after the execution of export order giving details about the goods shipped. It is essential that the invoice is prepared in the name of the buyer or the consignee mentioned in the letter of credit. It is a prima facie evidence of the contract of sale or purchase and therefore, must be prepared strictly in accordance with the contract of sale. Contents of Commercial Invoice Name and address of the exporter.
  • 6. Name and address of the consignee. Name and the number of Vessel or Flight. Name of the port of loading. Name of the port of discharge and final destination. Invoice number and date. Exporters reference number. Buyers reference number and date. Name of the country of origin of goods. Name of the country of final destination. Terms of delivery and payment. Marks and container number. Number and packing description. Description of goods giving details of quantity, rate and total amount in terms of internationally accepted price quotation. Signature of the exporter with date. Significance of Commercial Invoice It is the basic document useful in preparation of various other shipping documents. It is used in various export formalities such as quality and pre-Shipment inspection excise and customs procedures etc. It is also useful in negotiation of documents for collection and claim of incentives. It is useful for accounting purposes to both exporters as well as importers.2 Inspection Certificate: The certificate is issued by the inspection authority such as the export inspection agency. This certificate states that the goods have been inspected before shipment, and that they confirm to accepted quality standards.3 Marine insurance policy: Goods in transit are subject to risk of loss of goods arising due to fire on ship, perils of sea, theft etc. marine insurance protects losses incidental to voyages and in land transportation. Marine insurance policy is one of the most important document used as collateral security because it protects the interest of all those who have
  • 7. insurable interest at the time of loss. The exporter is bound to insure the goods in case of CIF quotation, but he can also insure the goods in case of FOB contract, at the request of the importer, but the premium payment will be made by the exporter. There are different types of policies such as SPECIFIC POLICY: This policy is taken to cover different risks for a single shipment. For a regular exporter, this policy is not advisable as he will have to take a separate policy every time a shipment is made, so this policy is taken when exports are in frequent. Floating Policy: This is taken to cover all shipments for some months. There is no time limit, but there is a limit on the value of goods and once this value is crossed by several shipments, then it has to be renewed. Open Policy: This policy remains in force until cancelled by either party i.e. insurance company or the exporter. Open Cover Policy: This policy is generally issued for 12 months period, for all shipments to one or more destinations. The open cover may specify the maximum value of consignment that may be sent per ship and if the value exceeded, the insurance company must be informed by the exporter. Insurance Premium: Differs upon product to product and a number of such other factors, such as, distance of voyage, type and condition of packing, etc. Premium for air consignments are lowered as compared to consignments by sea.4. Consular Invoice: Consular invoice is a document required mainly by the Latin American countries like Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Mauritius, New Zealand, Myanmar, Iraq, Australia, Fiji, Cyprus, Nigeria, Ghana, Guinea, Zanzibar, etc. This invoice is the most important document, which needs to be submitted for certification to the Embassy of the importing country concerned. The main purpose of the consular invoice is to enable the authorities of the importing country to collect accurate information about the volume, value, quality, grade, source, etc., of the goods imported for the purpose of assessing import duties and also for statistical purposes. In order to obtain consular invoice, the exporter is required to submit three copies of invoice to the Consulate of the importing country concerned. The Consulate of the importing country certifies them in return for fees.
  • 8. One copy of the invoice is given to the exporter while the other two are dispatched to the customs office of the importers country for the calculation of the import duty. The exporter negotiates a copy of the consular invoice to the importer along with other shipping documents. Significance of Consular Invoice for the Exporter It facilitates quick clearance of goods from the customs in exporters as well as importers country. Certification of goods by the Consulate of the importing country indicarer that the importer has fulfilled all procedural and licensing formalities for import of goods. It also assures the exporter of the payment from the importing country. Significance of Consular Invoice for the Importer It facilitates quick clearance of goods from the customs at the port destination and therefore, the importer gets quick delivery of goods. The importer is assured that the goods imported are not banned for imported in his country. Significance of Consular Invoice for the Customs Office It makes the task of the customs authorities easy. It facilitates quick calculation of duties as the value of goods as determine by the Consulate is considered for the purpose.5. Certificate of Origin: The importers in several countries require a certificate of origin without which clearance to import is refused. The certificate of origin states that the goods exported are originally manufactured in the country whose name is mentioned in the certificate. Certificate of origin is required when:- The goods produced in a particular country are subject to‟ preferential tariff rates in the foreign market at the time importation.
  • 9. The goods produced in a particular country are banned for import in the foreign market.Types of the Certificate of Origin(a) Non-preferential Certificate, of Origin: - Non-preferential certificate of origin is required in general by all countries for clearance of goods by the importer, on which no preferential tariff is given. It is issued by: ¬ The authorised Chamber of Commerce of the exporting country. Trade Association. Of the exporting country.(b) Certificate of Origin for availing Concessions under GSP :- Certificate of origin required for availing of concessions under Generalised System of Preferences (GSP) extended by certain, countries such as France, Germany, Italy, BENELUX countries, UK, Australia; Japan, USA, etc. This certificate can be obtained from specialised agencies, namely; Export Inspection Agencies. Jt. Director General of Foreign Trade.. Commodity Boards and their regional offices. Development Commissioner, Handicrafts. Textile Committees for textile products. Marine Products Export Development Authority for marine products. Development Commissioners of EPZs(c) Certificate for availing Concessions under Commonwealth Preferences (CWP): Certificate of origin for the purpose of Commonwealth Preference is also known as Combined Certificate of Origin and Value. It is required by two member countries, i.e. Canada and New Zealand of the Commonwealth. For concession under Commonwealth preferences, the certificates or origin have to be submitted in special forms obtainable, from the High Commission of the country concerned.(d) Certificate for availing Concessions under other Systems of Preference:- Certificate of origin is also required for tariff concessions. under the Global System of Trade Preferences
  • 10. (GSTP), Bangkok Agreement(BA) and SAARC Preferential Trading Arrangement (SAPTA) under which India grants and receives tariff concessions On imports and exports. Export Inspection Council (EIC) is the sole authority to print blank Certificates of Origin under BA, SAARC and SAPTA which can be issued by such agencies as EPCs, DCs of EPZs, EIC, APEDA, MPEDA, FIEO, etc...Contents of Certificate of Origin Name and logo of chamber of commerce. Name and address of the exporter. Name and address of the consignee. Name and the number of Vessel of Flight Name of the port of loading. Name of the port of discharge and place of delivery. Marks and container number. Packing and container description. Total number of containers and packages. Description of goods in terms of quantity. Signature and initials of the concerned officer of the issuing authority. Seal of the issuing authority.Significance of the Certificate of Origin Certificate of origin is required for availing of concessions under Generalised System of Preferences (GSP) as well as under Commonwealth Preferences (CWP). It is to be submitted to the customs for the assessment of duty clearance of goods with concessional duty. It is required when the goods produced in a particular country are banned for import in the foreign market. It helps the buyer in adhering to the import regulations of the country. Sometimes, in order to ensures that goods bought from some other country have not been reshipped by a seller, a certificate of origin IS required.
  • 11. 6. Bill of Lading: The bill of lading is a document issued by the shipping company or its agent acknowledging the receipt of goods on board the vessel, and undertaking to deliver the goods in the like order and condition as received, to the consignee or his order, provided the freight and other charges as specified in the bill have been duly paid. It is also a document of title to the goods and as such, is freely transferable by endorsement and delivery.Bill of Lading serves three main purposes: As a document of title to the goods; As a receipt from the shipping company; and As a contract for the transportation of goods.Types of Bill of Lading Clean Bill of Lading: - A bill of lading acknowledging receipt of the goods apparently in good order and condition and without any qualification is termed as a clean bill of lading. Claused Bill of Lading: - A bill of lading qualified with certain adversere marks such as, "goods insufficiently packed in accordance with the Carriage of Goods by Sea Act," is termed as a claused bill of lading. Transhipment or Through Bill of Lading: - When the carrier uses other transport facilities, such as rail, road, or another steamship company in addition to his own, the carrier issues a through or transhipment bill of lading. Stale Bill of Lading: - A bill of lading that has been held too long before it is passed on to a bank for negotiation or to the consignee is called a stale bill of lading. Freight Paid Bill of Lading: - When freight is paid at the time of shipment or in advance, the bill of landing is marked, freight paid. Such bill of lading is known as freight bill of lading. Freight Collect Bill of lading :- When the freight is not paid and is to be collected from the consignee on the arrival of the goods, the bill of lading is marked, freight collect and is known as freight collect bill of lading
  • 12. Contents of Bill of Lading Name and logo of the shipping line. Name and address of the shipper. Name and the number of vessel. Name of the port of loading. Name of the port of discharge and place of delivery. Marks and container number. Packing and container description. Total number of containers and packages, Description of goods in terms of quantity. Container status and seal number. Gross weight in kg. and volume in terms of cubic meters. Amount of freight paid or payable. Shipping bill number and date. Signature and initials of the Chief Officer. .Significance of Bill of Lading for Exporters It is a contract between the shipper and the shipping company for carriage of the goods to the port of destination. It is an acknowledgement indicating that the goods mentioned in the document have been received on board for the Purpose of shipment. A clean bill of lading certifies that the goods received on board the ship are in order and good condition. It is useful for claiming incentives offered by the government to exporters The exporter can claim damages from the shipping company if the goods are lost or damaged after the issue of a clean bill of lading.Significance of Bill of Lading for Importers It acts as a document of title to goods, which is transferable endorsement and delivery.
  • 13. The exporter sends the bill of lading to the bank of the importer so as to enable him to take the delivery of goods. The exporter can give an advance intimation to the foreign buyer about the shipment of goods by sending him a non-negotiable copy of bill of ladingSignificance of Bill of Lading for Shipping Company It is useful to the shipping company for collection of transport charges from the importer, if not collected from the exporter.7. Airway Bill: An airway bill, also called an air consignment note, is a receipt issued byan airline for the carriage of goods. As each shipping company has its own bill of lading, so eachairline has its own airway bill. Airway Bill or Air Consignment Note is not treated as adocument of title and is not issued in negotiable form. Contents of Airway Bill Name of the airport of departure and destination. The names and addresses of the consignor, consignee and the first carrier. Marks and container number. Packing and container description. Total number of containers and packages. Description of goods in terms of quantity. Container status and seal number. Amount of freight paid or payable. Signature and initials of the issuing carrier or his agent. Importance of Airway Bill: It is a contract between the airlines or his agent to carry goods to the destination. It is the document of instructions for the airline handling staff. It acts as a customs declaration form. Since, it contains details about freight it also represents freight bill.
  • 14. 7. Shipment Advice to Importer:- After the shipment of goods, the exporter intimates the importer about the shipment of goods giving him details about the date of shipment, the name of the vessel, the destination, etc. He should also send one copy of non-negotiable bill of lading to the importer.8. Packing List: The exporter prepares the packing list to facilitate the buyer to check the shipment. It contains the detailed description of the goods packed in each case, their gross and net weight, etc. The difference between a packing note and a packing list is that the packing note contains the particulars of the contents of an individual pack, while the packing list is a consolidated statement of the contents of a number of cases or packs.9. Bill of Exchange: The instrument is used in receiving payment from the importer. The importer may prefer Bill of Exchange to LC as it does not involve blocking of funds. A bill of exchange is drawn by the exporter on the importer, to make payment on demand at sight or after a certain period of time. B/E is a means to collect payment. B/E is a means to demand payment. B/E is a means to extent the credit. B/E is a means to promise the payment. B/E is an official acknowledgement of receipt of payment. Financial documents perform the function of obtaining the finance collection of payment etc. 2 sets. Each one bearing the exclusion clause making the other part of the draft invalid. Sight B/E. Usance B/E. It is known as draft. Immediate payment – Sight draft. There are two copies of draft. Each one bears reference to the other part A&B. when any one of the draft is paid, the second draft becomes null and void.Parties to bill of exchange.
  • 15. 1. The drawer: The exporter / person who draws the bill. 2. The drawee: The importer / person on whom the bill is drawn for payment. 3. The payee: The person to whom payment is made, generally, the exporter / supplier of the goods.B Auxiliary Documents: These documents generally form the basic documents based on whichthe commercial and or regulatory documents are prepared. These documents also do not haveany fixed formats and the number of such documents will wary according to individualrequirements. 1. Proforma Invoice: The starting point of the export contract is in the form of offer made by the exporter to the foreign customer. The offer made by the exporter is in the form of a proforma invoice. It is a quotation given as a reply to an inquiry. It normally forms the basis of all trade transactions. Contents of Proforma Invoice Name and address of the exporter. Name and address of the importer. Mode of transportation, such as Sea or Air or Multimodal transport. Name of the port of loading. Name of the port of discharge and final destination. Provisional invoice number and date. Exporters reference number. Buyers reference number and date. Name of the country of origin of goods. Name of the country of final destination. Marks and container number. . Number and packing description. Description of goods giving details of quantity, rate and total amount in terms of internationally accepted price quotation. Signature of the exporter with date.
  • 16. Importance of Proforma Invoice It forms the basis of all trade transactions. It may be useful for the importer in obtaining import licence or foreign exchange.2. Intimation for Inspection: Whenever the consignment requires the pre-shipment inspection, necessary application is to be made to the concerned inspection agency for conducting the inspection and issue of certificate thereof.3. Declaration of Insurance: Where the contract terms require that the insurance to be covered by the exporter, the shipper has to give details of the shipment to the insurance company for necessary insurance cover. The detailed declaration will cover: Name of the shipper exporter. Name & address of buyer. Details of goods such as packages, quantity, value in foreign currency as well as in Indian Rs. Etc. Name of the Vessel Aircraft. Value for which insurance to be covered.4. Application of the Certificate Origin: In case the exporter has to obtain Certificate of Origin from the concerned authorities, an application has to be made to the concerned authority with required documents. While the simple invoice copy will do for getting CO from the chamber of commerce, in respect of obtained the same from the office of the Textile Committee or Export Promotion Council, the documents requirement are different.5. Mates Receipt: Mates receipt is a receipt issued by the Commanding Officer of the ship when the cargo is loaded on the ship. The mates receipt is a prima facie evidence that goods are loaded in the vessel. The mates receipt is first handed over to the Port Trust Authorities. After making payment of all port dues, the exporter or his agent collects the mates receipt from the Port Trust Authorities. The mates receipt is freely transferable. It must be handed over to the shipping company in order to get the bill of lading. Bill of lading is prepared on the basis of the mates receipt.
  • 17. Types of Mates Receipts Clean Mates Receipt: - The Commanding Officer of the ship issues a clean mates receipt, if he is satisfied that the goods are packed properly and there is no defect in the packing of the cargo or package. Qualified Mates Receipt: - The Commanding Officer of the ship issues qualified mates receipt, when the goods are not packed properly and the shipping company does not take any responsibility of damage. to the goods during transit.Contents of Mates Receipt Name and logo of the shipping line. Name and address of the shipper. Name and the number of vessel. Name of the port of loading. Name of the port of discharge and place of delivery. Marks and container number. Packing and container description. Total number of containers and packages. Description of goods in terms of quantity. Container status and seal number. Gross weight in kg. and volume in terms of cubic meters. Shipping bill number and date. Signature and initials of the Chief Officer. Significance of Mates Receipt It is an acknowledgement of goods received for export on board the ship. It is a transferable document. It must be handed over to the shipping company in order to get the bill of lading. Bill of lading, which is the title of goods, is prepared on the basis of the mates receipt.
  • 18. It enables the exporter to clear port trust dues to the Port Trust Authorities. Obtaining Mates Receipt The goods are then loaded on board the ship for which the Mate or the Captain of the ship issues Mates Receipt to the Port Superintendent.6. Shipping order: it is issued by the Shipping/Conference Line intimating the exporter about the reservation of space for shipment of cargo which the exporter intends to ship. Details of the vessel, poet of the shipment, and the date on which the goods are to be shipped are mentioned. This order enables the exporter to make necessary arrangements for customs clearance and loading of the goods.7. Shipping Instructions: at the pre-shipment stage, when the documents are to sent to the CHA for customs clearance, necessary instructions are to be give with relevance to The export promotion scheme under which goods are to be exported. Name of the specific vessel on which the goods are to be loaded. If goods are to be FCL or LCL. If freight amount are to be paid / collected. If shipment are covered under A.R.E.-1 procedure. Instructions for obtaining Bill of Lading etc.8. Bank letter for negotiation of documents: at the post shipment stage, the exporter has to submit the documents to a bank for negotiation or discounting or collection for forwarding the same to the customer and also for realization of export proceeds. The bank letter is the set of instruction for the bank as to how to handle the documents by them and by the bank at the buyer‟s country which may include Name and address of the buyer. Details of various documents being sent and the number of the copies thereof. Name and address of the buyer‟s bank if available. If the documents are sent L/C or on open terms.
  • 19. If the proceeds are to adjusted against any pre-shipment packing credit loan. If the bill amount is to be adjusted against any forward exchange cover. In case of credit bill who has to bear the interest, either exporter or if the same is to be collected from the buyer. Instructions in case non-acceptance/non-payment by the buyer.C. Regulatory Document: Regulatory pre-shipment export documents are prescribed by the different government departments and bodies in order to comply with various rules and regulations under the relevant laws governing export trade such as export inspection, foreign exchange regulation, ex port trade control, customs, etc. Out of 9 regulatory documents four have been standardised and aligned. These are shipping bill or bill of export, exchange control declaration (GR from), export application dock challan or port trust copy of shipping bill and receipt for payment of port charges. 1. Shipping Bill: Shipping bill is the main customs document, required by the customs authorities for granting permission for the shipment of goods. The cargo is moved inside the dock area only after the shipping bill is duly stamped, i.e. certified by the customs. Shipping bill is normally prepared in five copies :- Customs copy. Drawback copy. Export promotion copy. Port trust copy. Exporters copy.Types of Shipping BillBased on the incentives offered by the government, customs authorities have introduced threetypes of shipping bills:- Drawback Shipping Bill: - Drawback shipping bill is useful for claiming the customs drawback against goods exported.
  • 20. Dutiable Shipping Bill: - Dutiable shipping bill is required for goods which are subject to export duty. Duty-free Shipping Bill: - Duty-free shipping bill is useful for exporting goods on which there is no export duty.In order to facilitate easy recognition and quick processing, following colours have beenprovided to different kinds of shipping bills :Types of goods By Sea By AirDrawback shipping bill Green GreenDutiable shipping bill Yellow PinkDuty-Free shipping bill White PinkContents of Shipping Bill Name and address of the exporter. Name and address of the importer. Name of the vessel, master or agents and flag. Name of the port at which goods are to be discharged. Country of final destination. Details about packages, description of goods, marks and numbers, quantity and details of each case. FOB price and real value of goods as defined in the Sea Customs Act. Whether Indian or foreign merchandise to be re-exported Total number of packages with total weight and value.Significance of Shipping Bill a) Shipping bill is the main customs document, required by the customs authorities for granting permission for the shipment of goods. b) The cargo is moved inside the dock area only after the shipping bill is duly stamped, i.e. certified by the customs.
  • 21. c) Duly endorsed shipping bill is also necessary for the collection of export incentives offered by the government. d) It is useful to the Customs Appraiser while determining the actual value of goods exported.2. A.R.E. 1 form (Central excise): this form ARE-1 is prescribed under Central Excise rules for export of goods. In case goods meant for export are cleared directly from the premises of a manufacturer, the exporter can avail the facility of exemption from payment of terminal excise duty. The goods may be cleared for export either under claim for rebate of duty paid or under bond without payment of duty. In both the events the goods are to be cleared under form A.R.E-1 which will show the details of the goods being exported, the relevant duty involved and if the duty is paid or goods being cleared under bond, details of goods being sealed either by the exporter or Central Excise officials etc.3. Exchange Control declaration Form (GR/PP/SOFTEX): under the exchange control regulations all exporters must declare the details of shipment for monitoring by the Reserve Bank of India. For this purpose, RBI has prescribed different forms for different types of shipments like GRI, PP forms etc. These declaration forms must be presented to the customs officials at the time of passing of export documentation. Under the EDI processing of shipping bill in the customs, these forms have been dispensed with and a new form SDF has to be submitted to the customs in the place of above forms.4. Export Application: this is the application to be made to the customs officials before shipment of goods. The prescribed form of the application is the Shipping Bill/Bill of Export. Different types are required for shipment like ex-bond, duty free goods, and dutiable goods and for export under different export promotion schemes such as claims for duty drawback etc.5. Vehicle Ticket/Cart Ticket/Gate Pass etc.: before the goods are being taken inside the port for loading, necessary permission has to be obtained for moving the vehicle into the customs area. This permission is granted by the Port Trust Authority. This document will contain the detail of the export cargo, name and address of the
  • 22. shippers, lorry number, marks and number of the packages, driver‟s licence details etc. 6. Bank Certificate of Realisation: this is the form prescribed under the Foreign Trade Policy, wherein the negotiating bank declares the fob value of exports and for the date of realisation of the export proceeds. This certificate is required fore obtaining the benefit under various schemes and this value of fob is reckoned as fob value of exports.D. Other Document: Black List Certificate: it certifies that the ship/aircraft carrying the cargo has not touched the particular country on its journey or that the goods are not from the particular country. This is required by certain nations who have strained political and economical relations with the so called “Black Listed Countries”. Language Certificate: Importers in the European Community require a language certificate along with the GSP certificate in respect of handloom cotton fabrics classifiable under NAMEX code 55.09. Generally four copies of language certificate are prepared by the concerned authority who issues GSP certificate. Three copies are handed over to the exporter. A copy is sent along with the other documents for realisation of export proceeds. Freight Payment Certificate: in most of the cases, the B/L or AWB will mention the transportation and other related charges. However if the exporter does not want these details to be disclosed to the buyer, the shipping company may issue a separate certificate for payment of the freight charges instead of declaring on the main transport documents. This document showing the freight payment is called the freight certificate. Insurance Premium Certificate: this is the certificate issued by the Insurance Company as acknowledgement of the amount of premium paid for the insurance cover. This certificate is required by the bank for arriving at the fob value of the goods to be declared in the bank certificate of realisation.
  • 23. Combined Certificate of Origin and Value: this certificate is required by the Commonwealth Countries. This certificate is printed in a special way by the Commonwealth Countries. This certificate should contain special details as to the origin and value of goods, which are useful for determining import duty. All other details are generally the same as that of Commercial Invoice, such as name of the exporter and the importer, quality and quantity of the goods etc. Customs Invoice: this is required by the countries like Canada, USA for imposing preferential tariff rates. Legalized Invoice: this is required by the certain Latin American Countries like Mexico. It is just like consular invoice, which requires certification from Consulate or authorised mission, stationed in the exporter‟s country.Special Provision under Uniform Customs and practice for Documentary Credit UCP-500,for Commercial Invoice. Article-37: Commercial Invoice o Must appear on their face to be issued by the beneficiary named in the credit. o Must be made out in the name of the applicant. o Need not be signed Banks may refuse Commercial Invoice issued for amounts in excess of the amount permitted by the credit except otherwise stated. The description of the goods in the commercial invoice must correspond with the description of the credit. In all other documents the goods may be described in the General in general terms not inconsistent with description in the credit. In all documents goods may be described in general terms not inconsistent with the Description of the goods in the credit.
  • 24. Pre-Shipment Documents: Shipping bill. Export order/Sales contract/Purchase order. Letter of Credit Commercial invoice. Packing list. Certificate of origin. Guaranteed Remittance (G.R/SDF/PP/SOFTEX),or SDF. Certificate of Inspection. Various declarations required as per custom procedure.Exchange Control Declaration Form: all exports to which the requirement of declaration applymust be declared on appropriate forms as indicated below unless the consignment is of samplesand of „No Commercial Value‟ GR FORM: to be completed in duplicate for exports otherwise than by post including export of software in physical form i.e. magnetic tape/discs and paper media. SDF FORM: to be completed in duplicate and appended to the Shipping Bill for export declare to the customs offices notified by the Central Government which have introduced EDI system for processing Shipping Bill. PP FORM: to be completed in duplicate for export by post. SOFTX: to be completed in triplicate for export of software otherwise than in the physical form i.e. magnetic tapes/discs and paper media.These forms are available for sale in Reserve Bank of India
  • 25. CONCLUSIONAT THE END OF THE PROJECT WE CONCLUDED THAT THE PROJECTHAS BEEN COMPLETED WITH COOPERATION OF THE COLLEAGUESAND OUR HARD WORK. BY DOING THIS PROJECT WE CAME TO KNOWABOUT THE VARIOUS DOCUMENTATION NEEDED FOR EXPORT. THEDOCUMENTATION NEEDED IS G.R FORM, CERTIFICATE OF THEORIGIN, COMMERCIAL INVOICE, AND CONSUMER INVOICE. THANK YOU
  • 26. ROLL NAME OF GROUP MEMBERNO61 ROSHAN FERNANDES62 AZIZ63 NIKUNJ GAJERA64 NIRAG GALA65 DHAVAL GALOLIYA66 TEJAL GANDHI67 MAHAVIR GAWARE68 THOMSON GEORGE69 SAGAR GHANT70 PRATHAMESH GHARAT