Filipino Proper Manners and          Etiquette
What is Manners?        In sociology, manners are the unenforcedstandards of conduct which demonstrate that a person ispro...
What is Etiquette?        Etiquette is a code of behavior that delineatesexpectations for social behavior according tocont...
History Of Etiquette
History Of Etiquette
History Of Etiquette
Social Etiquette
Social Etiquette   Filipinos hold gentlemanly etiquette in high regard.   When attending a funeral, avoid wearing loud c...
Social Etiquette   If someone needs to walk in front of the TV or between two    people, he or she must say "Excuse me" ....
Business Etiquette
Business Etiquette   Punctuality is not of the utmost importance in the Philippines, and    neither is the concept of an ...
Dining Etiquette
Dining Etiquette   For parties, arriving 15-20 minutes late is commonly known    as "Filipino time".   Follow dress code...
Dining Etiquette   When chancing upon a Filipino eating, he would invite the    visitor by inviting him to eat.   Filipi...
Gift Giving Etiquette
Gift Giving Etiquette   Gift giving is important on many occasions such as weddings and    birthdays   Once a contract h...
Filipino proper manners and etiquette
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Filipino proper manners and etiquette

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  • Good afternoon classmates and Miss Diane. My topic is about Filipino Proper Manners and Etiquette. First of all, I’ll be showing you a picture where you will see a situation having an etiquette.
  • So, what do you think of this picture guys? Obviously, we can see that the right girl in the picture is seating properly and in the left one, she is not seating properly. We can tell their nationalities too. This photo demonstrates the difference between eastern and western culture. Asian women are known to be much more conservative than European and American women, they are more promiscuous. This photograph illustrates the right and wrong way for a lady to sit.B. Tie to the audience. Etiquette.. As we all mature over the years, some things aren’t acceptable as they used to be. When we have confrontation with another, we can’t just simply stick out our tongue at them as we did in kindergarten, we must use our words to solve our differences in opinion.C. Preview. Today, I will tell you first the meaning of manners and etiquette, second, the history of etiquette, and third, the different situations that must have proper manners and etiquette and the proper ways to behave in these situations.
  • I will tell you first what is the meaning of manners and etiquette. So, what is manners? In sociology, manners are the unenforced standards of conduct which demonstrate that a person is proper, polite, and refined. They are like laws in that they codify or set a standard for human behavior, but unlike laws, there is no formal system for punishing transgressions, the main informal "punishment“, being social disapproval.  A lady is a term frequently used for a woman who follows proper manners; the term gentleman is used as a male counterpart; though these terms are also often used for members of a particular social class.
  • What is Etiquette? Etiquette is a code of behavior that delineates expectations for social behavior according to contemporary conventional norms within a society, social class, or group. Rules of etiquette encompass most aspects of social interaction in any society, though the term itself is not commonly used. A rule of etiquette may reflect an underlying ethical code or it may reflect a person's fashion or status. Rules of etiquette are usually unwritten, but aspects of etiquette have been codified from time to time.Now that I’ve discussed what is the meaning of manners and etiquette, I will now discuss the history of etiquette
  • The foundation for modern etiquette began in the French royal courts in between the 1600s and 1700s. Under King Louis XIV, a placard was devised and posted with rules for all to follow. He established an elaborate and rigid court ceremony, but distinguished himself from the high bourgeoisie by continuing to eat, stylishly and fastidiously, with his fingers. The French word étiquette, signifying ticket first appeared in English in 1750.
  • Even before Louis XIV, the first known etiquette book was written in 2400 B.C. by Ptah-hotep. Good manners have been around for a long time. It was from these origins that American etiquette grew.
  • In more modern American times, The self-proclaimed debutante-turned-writer, Emily Post wrote "Etiquette--In Society, In. Business, In Politics, and At Home." This popular book about manners was published in 1922. It became a best-seller and paved the way for her successors to continue preaching good manners.Post was succeeded by Amy Vanderbilt, who called herself a "journalist in the field of etiquette." Her contribution to American good manners was "Amy Vanderbilt's Complete Guide To Etiquette."  Soon other etiquette mavens followed, including Letitia Baldrige and Judith "Miss Manners" Martin, whose tongue-in-cheek columns led to the publishing of several books on etiquette, including "Miss Manners Guide To Domestic Tranquillity", which she published in 1999. Today, the field of etiquette has expanded beyond society manners. Etiquette is dependent on culture; what is excellent etiquette in one society may shock another. Etiquette evolves within culture. Now that we have learned the history of etiquette, I will now discuss the situations that Filipinos must have proper manners and etiquette and the proper ways to behave in these situations.
  • 1. Social EtiquetteWhen you are in a place where there are people around you, irrespective of interaction, you should have certain behavioral manners with every age group present. This can be called social etiquette and possessing it only makes you a descent and good human being. People who have social etiquette have a sense of maturity on how to behave in public and to keep their calm when there are social outbreaks and related emergencies. Filipinos are friendly and nice people. Their courteous and hospitable nature is extended to all visitors except, of course, for those with bad intentions.
  • 1. Filipinos hold gentlemanly etiquette in high regard. For example, in waiting rooms or on buses, men will surrender their seats to the handicapped, the elderly, pregnant women, and women in general, although this is generally ignored today.2. When attending a funeral, avoid wearing loud colors, especially red. Black, white, grays, muted and earth tones are proper colors for funeral attire. Due to the Philippine heat,white is preferred by many.3. Filipinos place importance on proper introductions. Older people are introduced to younger individual is not expected to remember all the names at first introduction. 4. Always acknowledge the presence of older people in the room by shaking their hands. If the age difference is great,or in some cases a religious authority, ask for their hand and bring it to the forehead (this important gesture is called "Mano"). 5. Never address older people at the same level; use the words "tito" or "tita" for relatives of friends but only if they are close or prefer to be addressed in that manner. 6. When speaking to elders, be respectful in tone and language, using "opo" and its shortcut "pò" wheresoever required. 7. It is expected that guests are to be lively and take part in the conversation. Keeping quiet during a gathering is interpreted as being bored or unhappy.8. During social gatherings, the elderly are usually greeted first. This reflects that part of Filipino culture where there is deep regard given to one's elders. 9. Boisterous or loud talking is generally frowned upon, but this rule is almost never followed, except by the educated, or when someone is in pain or distress.
  • 10.If someone needs to walk in front of the TV or between two people, he or she must say "Excuse me" and lower the head, almost bowing, while passing through.11. When one person meets an acquaintance at any form of public transport, he/she must never forget to greet him/her. In some instances, one takes the responsibility to pay his companion's fare. Allowing this to happen without protest is considered rude.12. In the Philippines, kissing and displaying affection in public is considered scandalous and in bad taste. but it is likewise rude to make a scene of it; one merely ignores, or at best, stares down couples who make public displays of affection13. If you happen to visit a friend, you'll notice that the shoes are left outside or placed in a shoe holder of some kind. If unsure of where to place your shoes, your host will be kind enough to tell you. 14. In gratitude of an invitation to a home or an occasion, Filipinos appreciate guests bringing a fruit basket or any food. Such a gesture is called "pasalubong". Filipinos value the gentlemanly gesture. It is customary for men to assist women in carrying groceries, climbing up a ladder or coming down from a staircase.15. Some Filipinos simply nod their head once when saying yes instead of saying it. So if you ask a question that is answerable by yes or no, you may get this reply if it's a yes.16. A handshake or a smile is the general norm of greeting in Philippines.  Filipino handshakes are much limper than the Western variety, and a firm grip can come across as aggressive.
  • Business etiquette is in essence about building relationships with people. In the business world, it is people that influence your success or failure. Etiquette, and in particular business etiquette, is simply a means of maximising your business potential. Business etiquette revolves around two things. Firstly, thoughtful consideration of the interests and feelings of others and secondly, minimising misunderstandings.  Both are dependent upon self conduct. Business etiquette polishes this conduct.
  • Punctuality is not of the utmost importance in the Philippines, and neither is the concept of an RSVP. Business travelers should not count on their filipino partners to show up at a meeting that was scheduled several weeks or months in advance; it is always wise to call a day or two ahead of the scheduled meeting to confirm attendance.2. There may be several minutes of small talk before getting down to business. People like to hang around afterwards for more of the same, even if the meeting itself has been tense. 3. Start out by addressing a new business acquaintance by his or her family name. "Mister" is obviously proper for men, while many married Filipinas prefer "Mrs."; use "Ms." sparingly, or at least until her preference is clear. 4. Wait to be told where to sit. Quite often seating conforms to the rank of the people involved.5. Filipinos avoid confrontation if possible. It is difficult for them to say "no". Likewise, their "yes" may merely mean "perhaps". 6. An integral part of culture and values is hospitality. We are very good in taking care of visitors and guests.Thus, after a hard day’s work, we like to enjoy ourselves in the company of family, friends, colleagues and partners. Once invited to a party or celebration by a Filipino, it is important that you go along with the activities in the party – dancing, drinking, eating, singing and games.7. Filipinos observe a wide range of grooming styles. When invited to a meeting, it is always safe to wear business attire. In some very special occasions, the invitation will even indicate the attire of guest.8. Filipinos are basically hygienic. They are very particular about how a person smells and his overall health. Do not face your partners without taking a bath.9. Many of the business practices are anchored on the Catholic religion and various ancient superstition. They put symbols and objects in the reception area of their business address to bring luck. A priest would bless the factory, office or store of the business to bring good fortune to all the occupants and the entrepreneur.10. When greeting business partners, a firm and brisk handshake is good with a warm smile on your face. During the initial meeting, exchange of business cards is important and make sure that your business card contains your information.
  • For parties, arriving 15-20 minutes late is commonly known as "Filipino time".The wife of the party host must not be labeled or called as hostess as it implies a different meaning for Filipinos and might cause annoyance.Follow dress codes, and groom yourself, you will be judged on how you dress.Filipinos like to  entertain. If a Filipino in a restaurant or club invites you to sit down or offers you food, it is polite to decline the first time. If the offer comes again, have a seat and enjoy the hospitalityWherever you travel in the Philippines, you’re sure to come across a turoturo (literally translated as ‘point-point’). As might be expected, you should approach the counter at these cafeteria style places and simply point to the food you would like to order.Do not take the last bit of food from a central serving plate if there is one.that means there will be none left in case someone else wants more.Toothpicks are often used at the end of the meal. The best way to handle a toothpick is to work away with one hand, while keeping the other hand in front of it over the mouth, as a sort of mask. The most honored position is at the head of the table, as in the western European style, with the honored guest(s) sitting to the right of the host (and hostess):
  • 8. When chancing upon a Filipino eating, he would invite the visitor by inviting him to eat. However, to actually sit down and eat upon his invitation is considered rude. It is the host's prerogative to be gracious, but it is the guest's burden to avoid being overbearing. 9. Filipinos may view a dinner/party invitation as just a passing thought. They may answer "yes," but not take an invitation seriously. Phone to re-invite and remind. 10. Toasts are common in the Philippines, especially at business meetings. Usually the host or lead of the visiting party initiates a toast.11. Usually the one who does the inviting pays the bill, although the guest is expected to make an effort to pay. Sometimes other circumstances determine the payee (such as rank). Making payment arrangements ahead of time so that no exchange occurs at the table is a very classy way to host, and is very common.12. At the end of the meal, you may be given pabaon. a doggie bag with the leftover food in it. This is a common expression of hospitality; make an effort to reject it, but ultimately take it.13. Hosts will invariably lay out a snack for their visitors. Visitors should always accept and consume the snack. Only in certain circumstances is it socially acceptable to decline, i.e., if the guest is allergic.
  • 1. Gift giving is important on many occasions such as weddings and birthdays. If a gift is unavailable on short notice, a food item may be brought instead. If invited to a restaurant, do not assume the opportunity to buy the celebrant dinner; bring a gift instead.2. Once a contract has been signed, prepare to give your new partners a gift of greater value. Whatever you decide, avoid being so extravagant in your selection that your gift is perceived as a bribe.3. When selecting wrapping paper for a Filipino recipient, you may use any colour you wish, which makes the Philippines somewhat of an anomaly among other Asian countries.4. When invited to a Filipino home, bring a gift of flowers, candy or chocolates. Allowances are made, however, for a specialty dish or food that is unique to your home region. 5. At Christmas, you will be expected to give a small, modest gift to practically everyone you encounter in a business context. This includes everyone who works for you and all service personnel you depend upon regularly.6. When you receive a gift, follow the Asian custom by not opening it in front of the giver. Instead, wait until you are alone.7. During certain family events, particularly baptisms, it is customary to toss a handful of small coins to any children present.8. At weddings, guests will sometimes use pins to attach money--typically bills in small denominations--to the clothing of the bride and groom.III. ConclusionSummary So today I discussed with you about the Filipino manners and etiquette. 1.  I informed you what is the meaning of manners and etiquette.2.  I informed you the history of etiquette.3.  I informed you the different situations that must have proper manners and etiquette.  Tie back to the audienceI'd guess that the way we behave toward others, directly or as a result of our actions, is a way in which we are judged by others.Who wants to be around/associated with someone who is constantly self absorbed, or mean to others, or doesn't show a tendency toward caring about anyone?We (should) value empathy in others and ourselves.ClosingSo when you are in public places, you should know proper etiquette because it shows if you are a lady or gentleman. It shows that you are sensible, educated and an adult. It is good and you will get respect from others. Thank you.
  • Filipino proper manners and etiquette

    1. 1. Filipino Proper Manners and Etiquette
    2. 2. What is Manners? In sociology, manners are the unenforcedstandards of conduct which demonstrate that a person isproper, polite, and refined. They are like laws in that theycodify or set a standard for human behavior, but, unlikelaws, there is no formal system for punishingtransgressions, the main informal "punishment" beingsocial disapproval. A lady is a term frequently used for awoman who follows proper manners; the term gentlemanis used as a male counterpart; though these terms arealso often used for members of a particular social class.
    3. 3. What is Etiquette? Etiquette is a code of behavior that delineatesexpectations for social behavior according tocontemporary conventional norms within a society, socialclass, or group. Rules of etiquette encompass mostaspects of social interaction in any society, though theterm itself is not commonly used. A rule of etiquette mayreflect an underlying ethical code or it may reflect apersons fashion or status. Rules of etiquette are usuallyunwritten, but aspects of etiquette have been codifiedfrom time to time.
    4. 4. History Of Etiquette
    5. 5. History Of Etiquette
    6. 6. History Of Etiquette
    7. 7. Social Etiquette
    8. 8. Social Etiquette Filipinos hold gentlemanly etiquette in high regard. When attending a funeral, avoid wearing loud colors. Filipinos place importance on proper introductions. Always acknowledge the presence of older people in the room by shaking their hands Never address older people at the same level. When speaking to elders, be respectful in tone and language. It is expected that guests are to be lively and take part in the conversation During social gatherings, the elderly are usually greeted first. Boisterous or loud talking is generally frowned upon.
    9. 9. Social Etiquette If someone needs to walk in front of the TV or between two people, he or she must say "Excuse me" . When one person meets an acquaintance at any form of public transport, he/she must never forget to greet him/her. In the Philippines, kissing and displaying affection in public is considered scandalous and in bad taste. If you happen to visit a friend, youll notice that the shoes are left outside or placed in a shoe holder of some kind In gratitude of an invitation to a home or an occasion, Filipinos appreciate guests bringing a fruit basket or any food. Some Filipinos simply nod their head once when saying yes instead of saying it. A handshake or a smile is the general norm of greeting in Philippines
    10. 10. Business Etiquette
    11. 11. Business Etiquette Punctuality is not of the utmost importance in the Philippines, and neither is the concept of an RSVP. There may be several minutes of small talk before getting down to business. Start out by addressing a new business acquaintance by his or her family name. Wait to be told where to sit. Filipinos avoid confrontation if possible. An integral part of culture and values is hospitality. Filipinos observe a wide range of grooming styles. Filipinos are basically hygienic. Many of the business practices are anchored on the Catholic religion and various ancient superstition. When greeting business partners, a firm and brisk handshake is good with a warm smile on your face.
    12. 12. Dining Etiquette
    13. 13. Dining Etiquette For parties, arriving 15-20 minutes late is commonly known as "Filipino time". Follow dress codes, and groom yourself. Filipinos like to entertain. Wherever you travel in the Philippines, you’re sure to come across a turo turo (literally translated as ‘point-point’). Do not take the last bit of food from a central serving plate if there is one . Toothpicks are often used at the end of the meal. The most honored position is at the head of the table.
    14. 14. Dining Etiquette When chancing upon a Filipino eating, he would invite the visitor by inviting him to eat. Filipinos may view a dinner/party invitation as just a passing thought. Toasts are common in the Philippines, especially at business meetings. Usually the one who does the inviting pays the bill, although the guest is expected to make an effort to pay. At the end of the meal, you may be given pabaon. Hosts will invariably lay out a snack for their visitors.
    15. 15. Gift Giving Etiquette
    16. 16. Gift Giving Etiquette Gift giving is important on many occasions such as weddings and birthdays Once a contract has been signed, prepare to give your new partners a gift of greater value. When selecting wrapping paper for a Filipino recipient, you may use any color you wish When invited to a Filipino home, bring a gift of flowers, candy or chocolates. At Christmas, you will be expected to give a small, modest gift to practically everyone you encounter in a business context. When you receive a gift, follow the Asian custom by not opening it in front of the giver. During certain family events, particularly baptisms, it is customary to toss a handful of small coins to any children present. At weddings, guests will sometimes use pins to attach money-- typically bills in small denominations--to the clothing of the bride and groom.
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