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ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
ASIST - Data workshop 2007
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ASIST - Data workshop 2007

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Presentation from the ASIST Data workshop 2007

Presentation from the ASIST Data workshop 2007

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  • 1. ASIS&T IA Summit Pre-ConferenceDesigning with structured data Margaret Hanley 23rd March 2007 ASIS&T, 1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510 Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA Phone (301) 495-0900 Email: asis@asis.org
  • 2. IntroductionsMargaret Hanley• Independent IA consultant• Worked as an IA for the last 12 years• Worked on three continents – Australia, USA and UK• Been both a consultant and internal staff to companies like Sensis (Yellow Pages in Australia), Argus Associates (US), Ingenta (UK), BBC (UK) and DNA Consulting (UK)
  • 3. Information architecture – the future
  • 4. What do there examples have in common?
  • 5. Data at the core of the applications realised: In interfaces As APIs Mash-ups
  • 6. ProgressionWe are moving from architecting for one site to... A web of data A web of data sources, services for exploring and manipulating data and ways that users can connect them together* * Tom Coates My Future of Web Apps slides Posted February 13, 2006 1:10 AM. http://www.plasticbag.org/archives/2006/02/my_future_of_web_apps_slides/
  • 7. By understanding the data as IAs we have:• the ability to use data in our sites – Understanding the data well enough to be able to use it – Think about different interfaces that allow people to manipulate it• The opportunity to create the data in our organisations – To set it free – Extend the brand – Re-use across an organisation
  • 8. Information architecture – the future
  • 9. Information architecture – the future User actions•Add Photo•Send to group•Add to set•Blog this Tags •Snow •London •Broadcasting_House •Tom •Gavin •2004
  • 10. Information architecture – the future
  • 11. Information architecture – the futureCreating the data to start with• We are used to creating a feed for one purpose (filling in a sales order)• Do we architect the content from the beginning without knowing what interface that will be created from it?
  • 12. Information architecture – the futureAdditional skills – combining data with presentation• How does the API work?• How will a layer of data over the top be represented in the interface?• Can we design the layers of interface and data – pretending we are the end-users who build on top of content?• What guidelines will we give them?
  • 13. Information architecture – the future• Focusing not on a progression of pages, but interaction between data and the user in the application• Showing states and feedback within the application
  • 14. Information architecture – the future• Identifying that user involvement and participation “in” the site is as important as the authoritative content• This could range from – Tagging – Creating the content itself – Creating a social network
  • 15. Why we should care• We can create more engaging interfaces• We can create more complex applications• Rather than content sites, we are presenting sites to interact with; this is a combination of interface design and data design• It takes CMS implementations to the next level, rather than designing pages we are designing objects as Karen described earlier today
  • 16. Two components• Data that is well structured and described• Interfaces that are clear and have controls for interaction
  • 17. DataData that is:• Well structured• Available to users either as human or machine readable formats• Can be used on a web page for display or combined to create a new interface or data
  • 18. Data• Is not necessarily complex info like GPS• Needs the hook – the ability to map to something else either by explicit user action or by the properties of the content• Example – Flickr photos and maps – Explicit action of the user to place it on the map and therefore tag it with location – Property would be the putting into your camera the place when you were taking the photo
  • 19. InterfacesTwo types1. Mash-up interface (Map my run) – Clarity of interface – Usually a base interface that allows the data to be layered and manipulated – Controls for the user2. Original interface (YouTube) – Designing the interface of your components for mash-up or manipulation – Ease of use – Creating an interface that continues the brand, even though a mash-up
  • 20. New types of interaction• Animating – generating movement in the representation• Annotating – augmenting a representation by placing notes or marks on it• Chunking – Grouping a number of similar or related, but disjointed, visual elements into a single visual structure• Composing - putting together separate visual elements to create a new representation. Similar to chunking. Composing focuses on the representation as a whole, chunking on creating the sub-components• Karl Fast, IA Summit presentation 2005 http://www.iasummit.org/2005/finalpapers/148_Presentation.pdf
  • 21. New types of interaction• Cutting – Removing unwanted or unnecessary portion of a representation• Filtering – Showing, hiding or transforming a select subset of the visual elements of a representation according to certain characteristics or criteria• Fragmenting – Breaking a representation into it’s component or elemental parts. The reverse of composing or chunking
  • 22. New types of interaction• Probing – Focusing on or drilling into some aspect, property or component of a representation for further analysis and information• Rearranging – Changing the spatial and /or direction of elements within a representation• Repicturing – Displaying a representation in an alternative manner so it can be viewed from different perspectives
  • 23. New types of interaction• Scoping – Changing the degree to which a representation is visually constructed/deconstructed by adjusting its field of view• Searching – Seeking out the existence of or position of specific features, elements or structures within a representation
  • 24. Annotating
  • 25. Composing
  • 26. Composing
  • 27. Filtering
  • 28. Filtering
  • 29. PIPs• Programme information pages – a page for every programme episode, broadcast on BBC• Cross-divisional project – Radio and Music interactive and New Media Central – Now being used to supply information to the iPlayer
  • 30. Programme hierarchy• Brand • Blackadder • Friends• Group • Blackadder • Tenth series goes forth• Episode • Episode 6 - • Episode 3: The Goodbyeee One with Rosss Tan• Broadcast • 31/03/2007 • 23/03/2007 instance
  • 31. Standards and data sources• Standards – TV Anytime – standard developed by broadcasters – SMEF – BBC standard data model• Classification – BBC I & A post-coordinated classification system – TV Anytime – faceted classification (genre, format, small subject list) – SID – ad hoc taxonomies; two level deep – Web site – combination of subject, format and genre
  • 32. PIPs• Creating the data – I sat down with database architect and he and I came up with PIP XML• The core aspect to PIP XML was the factual information about a programme; the programme hierarchy, short and long descriptions, genres• Non-core information was added as content objects by the CMS
  • 33. PIPs• What came first- the interface or the data?• We had a really strong idea about how we could use the programme information, even if we didn’t have the interfaces developed - schedules, pages, snippets• So it was a bit of both ☺
  • 34. Information architecture – the future
  • 35. Exercise• We have about ½ hour to start to create an interface using data.• Please get into groups of about 5-6 to do this exercise.• Your exercise sheet has the instructions.

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