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Tourism in LEDCs: Kenya
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Tourism in LEDCs: Kenya

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  • London temperatures are much lower throughout the year – so a much warmer climate is an attraction. <br /> Rainfall in London is fairly evenly spread throughout the year. Nairobi has distinct wet and dry seasons. In the UK summer months rainfall in Nairobi is lower than in London. <br /> This could also lead to a discussion about different climates across Kenya and the reasons for them. <br />
  • The threat of terrorism after the 9/11 bombings in the USA had a profound effect on international tourism. Also in Nov 2002 a bomb blast killed 16 people in a Mombassa Hotel. <br /> The latest international tourist arrival figures can be obtained from the World Tourism Organisation. <br />
  • This is the list of information that appears in the exercise: <br /> They are no longer allowed to graze their cattle in the game reserves. <br /> They are forced to live a more permanent life. <br /> Their villages are visited by tourists. <br /> They sell crafts and artefacts to tourists. <br /> They can afford for their children to go to school. <br /> Schemes are set up to provide clean water and improve housing. <br /> They perform traditional dances for the tourists <br /> Students could be given the list in advance and then be asked to complete the exercise on the board for others to discuss. Discussion could focus on those which are definite disadvantages and those which some may see as advantages but could be argued to conflict with the traditional culture of the Maasai people. <br /> This could lead to considering categories of impacts, i.e. environmental, social and economic impacts. <br />
  • Some of the consequences can have more than once category highlighted and some may even argue they are both positive and negative. Therefore this is an open-ended task. However, by reviewing a wide range of consequences, students should have the opportunity to evaluate the impact of tourism upon the Maasai Mara and its people. They should be encouraged to weigh up the type of consequences – for example, do the economic benefits outweigh the environmental costs? <br />

Tourism in LEDCs: Kenya Tourism in LEDCs: Kenya Presentation Transcript

  • International Tourism Case Study: Kenya These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. 1 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Learning objectives Where is Kenya? What attracts tourists to Kenya? What are the consequences of tourism in the Maasai Mara? How can tourism be managed in the future? 2 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Map of Kenya 3 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Label the map of Kenya 4 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Learning objectives Where is Kenya? What attracts tourists to Kenya? What are the consequences of tourism in the Maasai Mara? How can tourism be managed in the future? 5 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • What attracts tourists to Kenya? Study the photographs and make a list of reasons why tourists are attracted to Kenya. 6 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • What attracts European tourists to Kenya? Kenya enjoys a tropical climate. It is hot and humid at the coast, temperate inland and very dry in the northern and northeastern parts of the country. Nairobi London 180 180 160 160 140 140 120 120 100 C 80 mm 100 c 80 Ju l Au g Se pt O ct No v De c Ju n Ap r M ay ar M M Ja n Fe b 0 Ju l Au g Se pt O ct No v De c 20 0 Ju n 20 Ap r M ay 40 ar 60 40 Ja n Fe b 60 mm Use evidence from the graphs to suggest why British tourists may consider going on holiday to Kenya. 7 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Tourism in Kenya 8 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Learning objectives Where is Kenya? What attracts tourists to Kenya? What are the consequences of tourism in the Maasai Mara? How can tourism be managed in the future? 9 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • A typical safari holiday A typical safari holiday… Day 1 Arrive at Nairobi Airport and transfer to hotel. Day 2 Drive west to the Serena Mara Lodge in the Maasai Mara…it is built in African-style with a thatched roof. Enjoy cocktails on the terrace while looking over the glade. Day 3 Drive through the Mara in the jeeps and see buffalo, rhinoceros, elephants, birds, etc. Day 4 More game viewing with chance to see some of the more unusual species. Day 5 Visit the Maasai. Day 6 View the big game animals from a hot air balloon on your last day at the lodge. Enjoy your last evening with dancing from the Maasai. Day 7 Return to Nairobi. What are the consequences of this type of holiday? 10 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Consequences of tourism in the Maasai Mara What impact do you think tourism has on the animals and environment? 11 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Tourism in the Maasai Mara 12 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Consequences of tourism in the Maasai Mara An advantage of the game reserves is that animals are protected from being hunted. 13 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Examination question ‘Like several others, my camp (Maasai Mara) made a special effort to encourage leopards to appear. Every night, one of the guards crosses the river, using a small footbridge, and hangs meat on a tree. One leopard, clearly more interested in fast food than searching for dinner, regularly retrieves it…’ Independent, January 2000 14 of 25 Read the newspaper extract. 1. Why does the guard put meat over the river? 2. What impact does his practice have on the leopards? © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Consequences of tourism Traditionally the Maasai have lead a subsistence lifestyle as nomadic pastoralists. Subsistence is when people provide for themselves. They do not have surplus for sale although they may exchange products with other groups. Nomadic pastoralists are cattle herders who move around with the seasons. They do not have a permanent home. Until the Kenyan government set up the National Reserve in the 1950s the Maasai Mara was part of the Massai’s original land. 15 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Tourism in the Maasai Mara 16 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Tourism in the Maasai Mara Do you believe that tourism is good or bad for the Maasai Mara? Justify your answer. 17 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Examination question With reference to an area you have studied in an LEDC, explain the advantages and disadvantages that tourism can bring. 18 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Learning objectives Where is Kenya? What attracts tourists to Kenya? What are the consequences of tourism in the Maasai Mara? How can tourism be managed in the future? 19 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • How can tourism be managed in the future? The World Tourism Organisation believes that all tourism should be sustainable. It states that: ‘Sustainability principles refer to the environmental, economic and socio-cultural aspects of tourism development and a suitable balance must be established between these three dimensions to guarantee that any tourism scheme is long-term.’ 20 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Mass tourism versus ecotourism 21 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Ecotourism TIES defines ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people” It is known as many other things such as responsible tourism, alternative tourism, sustainable tourism, nature tourism and adventure tourism. 22 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • What is ecotourism? Ecotourism is a type of sustainable tourism which aims to take into account environmental, cultural and social considerations. Study these photographs of Tsavo Game Reserve. What evidence is there in the photographs that this type of safari is more beneficial to the environment than the lodge hotels in the Maasai Mara or Amboseli? 23 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Eselenkei Conservation Area 24 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Eselenkei Conservation Area 25 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Anagrams 26 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • Key ideas Tourism is an important industry for Kenya. Tourists are attracted to Kenya for its wildlife, its varied landscape, climate and its people. The Maasai Mara is an example of a game reserve in Southern Kenya. Tourism creates many environmental and socioeconomic consequences – these are both positive and negative. Eselenkei Conservation Area is an example of ecotourism which aims to be sustainable. 27 of 25 © Boardworks Ltd 2005