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The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
The structure of the Earth
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The structure of the Earth

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  • 1. • Ever wondered what our earth is made of? • Think of it as an apple. • An apple consists of the skin, the pulp and the core in the middle. • Similarly, the earth is made up of the thin outermost layer called the crust, the innermost part called the core, and the part in between them called the mantle. The Earth interior
  • 2. • Between the core and the crust, the intermediate zones form the mantle, which is mainly solid rocks but there is also a layer of molten rock called magma nearer the core. • Temperatures are high, at about 2000oC. MANTLE
  • 3. CONTINENTAL DRIFT • German scientist Alfred Wegener formed this idea of Continental Drift. • He argued that todays continents once formed a single landmass, which he named Pangaea (Greek for "all land"). • It broke into pieces due to the weaknesses in the earth's crust as they were made up of less dense materials, which drifted centimetre by centimetre over millions of years until they arrived at where they are now.
  • 4. • It is believed that the crust, beneath the oceans as well as the continents, together with the upper part of the mantle is divided into huge slabs called plates. • The movement of the plates is explained by the earlier theory of Continental Drift. • There are eight identified major plates plus an assortment of smaller ones.
  • 5. Magma heats up and rises.
  • 6. Magma spreads out, plates move apart. Water that is heated expands and rises to the surface of the pan. Similarly, the magma nearer the core expands and rises.

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