An introduction to Weather and Climate

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  • Images represent – doctors, drivers, shopkeepers, builders, tour operators and farmers. There are of course many more groups that could have been included…
    Opportunity to ask pupils to come up with other reasons as to why the weather is important?
    The ‘weatherwise’ section of the BBC’s website is a good site for further information http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/
  • This is animated so that the teacher can allow the class the opportunity to brainstorm what the changes in the atmosphere may include!
  • If pupils wish to research into the climates of particular places a useful starting point is http://www.worldclimate.com/
  • Simplified water cycle
  • Simplified water cycle
  • An opportunity to make a list of as many types of precipitation as possible:
    Rain
    Hail
    Sleet
    Snow
    Fog
    Dew
  • While all care is taken to ensure web links contain useful information, Boardworks does not take responsibility for the content or accuracy of external web sites.

Transcript

  • 1. Weather and Climate – an introduction These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. 1 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 2. Learning objectives Why do geographers study the weather? What is the difference between 'weather' and 'climate‘? What is the water cycle? What is precipitation? Why does it rain? 2 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 3. Why do geographers study the weather? The weather has an impact on many of the things that we do! Can you explain how the weather affects these people? 3 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 4. Learning objectives Why do geographers study the weather? What is the difference between 'weather' and 'climate'? What is the water cycle? What is precipitation? Why does it rain? 4 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 5. What is the difference between weather and climate? Weather is the day to day changes in the atmosphere. temperature precipitation humidity wind speed wind direction cloud cover air pressure 5 of 33 sunshine © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 6. What is the difference between weather and climate? Climate is the overall pattern of weather, usually based on an average over 30 years. Click on the buttons to find out about these types of climate. 6 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 7. World climate zones The types of climate can be classified into 6 major zones. 7 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 8. World climate zones What climate zone do you live in? What other climate zones have you visited? 8 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 9. World climate zones Imagine that you are a tour operator. Decide which of these pieces of advice you would give to people depending on which climate zone they are planning to visit! 9 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 10. Climates across the world 10 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 11. Climate graphs Climate graphs are a way of showing how temperature and precipitation vary throughout the year for a particular place. 11 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 12. How to construct a climate graph… 12 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 13. How to construct a climate graph… 1. Draw and label the axes (remember you need two names for the y axis – ‘temperature’ and ‘rainfall’ ). 2. Work out the right scale for each axis (look at your highest temperature and rainfall figures). 3. Draw the graph using bars for rainfall and a line for temperature. Remember to plot the temperature points in the middle of the months on the x axis. 13 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 14. Plot your own climate graph! Month Jan Fe Ma Apr Ma Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Rainfall (mm) 54 40 37 37 46 45 57 59 49 57 64 48 Temp (0C) 4 5 7 9 12 16 18 17 15 11 8 5 London (Kew) Use this data to draw a climate graph for London. Using data from an atlas draw a climate graph for another place, in the UK or somewhere else in the world. How does it compare to this climate graph of London? 14 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 15. UK - interactive climate graph 15 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 16. Learning objectives Why do geographers study the weather? What is the difference between 'weather' and 'climate‘? What is the water cycle? What is precipitation? Why does it rain? 16 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 17. The water cycle 70% of the Earth’s surface is covered by water. Store % Oceans and seas 97 Snow and ice (mainly in the Arctic and Antarctic) 2 In the atmosphere or on the land as rivers and lakes 1 Draw a graph to show where the Earth’s water is stored. Water is neither created nor destroyed. It is cycled round over and over again. This recycling of water is called the water cycle. 17 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 18. The water cycle 18 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 19. The water cycle 19 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 20. The water cycle in more detail 20 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 21. The water cycle – definitions! 21 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 22. Learning objectives Why do geographers study the weather? What is the difference between 'weather' and 'climate‘? What is the water cycle? What is precipitation? Why does it rain? 22 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 23. What is precipitation? Precipitation is water from the atmosphere. It can be in solid or liquid form. Name as many different types of precipitation as you can! 23 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 24. Learning objectives Why do geographers study the weather? What is the difference between 'weather' and 'climate‘? What is the water cycle? What is precipitation? Why does it rain? 24 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 25. Why does it rain? There are three main types of rainfall – relief, convectional and frontal. In all three situations, rainfall occurs because air rises. Air contains water vapour and as the air rises it cools and condensation can occur. This means that the water vapour returns back into minute droplets of water and falls as rain! 25 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 26. Convectional rain 26 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 27. Convectional rain 27 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 28. Relief rain 28 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 29. Relief rain 29 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 30. Frontal rain 30 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 31. Internet links Forecasts/climatic data www.worldclimate.com www.worldweather.org http://www.met-office.gov.uk/ Hurricane Andrew 1992 31 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 32. Weather and Climate Bingo! 32 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005
  • 33. Key Ideas Geographers study the weather because it has an impact on people’s daily lives and the activities that they do. Weather is the day to day changes in the atmosphere. Climate is the overall pattern of weather, usually based on an average over 30 years. The British Isles has a temperate climate. This means that it is not too hot, not too cold, not too dry and not too wet! Water is neither created nor destroyed. It is cycled round over and over again. This recycling of water is called the water cycle. Precipitation is water from the atmosphere. It can be in solid or liquid form. There are three main types of rainfall – relief, convectional and frontal. In all three situations, rainfall occurs because air is forced to rise. 33 of 33 © Boardworks Ltd 2005