Life on plantations

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  • Talk about how old the slaves are. Is it fair to make people do this kind of work? What should people of their age be doing? Do they look well? Where do they get their clothes? How would historians one and two use this source?
  • This is the house of a plantation owner, probably built by the slaves. It is very grand and is in stark contrast to the homes of the slaves as seen in the next slide.
  • Slave quarters were basic. Though they did offer shelter to the slaves, they were poorly built and had no amenities. How would historians one and two use this source?
  • This unit of work is aiming to help the class understand characteristics of plantation life. Also to understand how different interpretations can be created through creating two opposing views on plantation life using the same source material.
  • This is the key question that the children should be able to understand by the end of the unit. The final task can be an essay, a storyboard using biased sources, or a simple write up of their findings.
  • Introduce the pupils to the tentative nature of history and the word interpretation.
  • Explain terms FACT and OPINION. Use slide to illustrate BIAS and ask them for other examples of BIAS or of FACTS and OPINIONS.
  • Introduce the class to the notion that there is more than one way to view a picture or incident. This picture is slaves being thrown overboard, but you might get some interpreting it as the men trying to save the ones that have gone over the side.
  • Facial expressions tell the story. The class should be building up the idea that life for these people was not like their own. They worked hard, got no pay, were treated harshly and were not happy with their situation. How would historian one and two use this evidence?
  • Set the class the task of being historian one or two. Use source sheets – printed – to select, cut and paste sources that prove your viewpoint is true. Stick them onto A3 storyboards with a comment about each source selected proving your opinion is correct. Six sources in total.
  • This slide can be printed along with the next if the groups are going to cut and paste onto paper storyboards to produce a biased interpretation of life on the plantations.
  • Further sources for use in proving their view point.
  • Even more sources.
  • These sources were taken from the Spartacus website
  • These sources also came from Spartacus.

Transcript

  • 1. Use the picture to help explain what a plantation was
  • 2. What is a plantation? It is a farm that grows only one crop – such as tobacco, sugar or cotton.
  • 3. What can you see in the image? Label your picture
  • 4. Plantation owners in need of slaves could buy them as they would buy cattle or any commodity. Newspapers were full of advertisements which ran as follows: "Excellent Negroes for sale; young woman to cook, wash and iron, with four children: two boys, 12 and 9, girl, 5, able to sew, and girl, 4." Slaves were sold by families, though more often singly. Who worked there? Planters, overseers and Slaves
  • 5. Here is a scene from life on a plantation.  What are they doing?  Is it hard work?  Would you like to do it?  Would you do it for NOTHING? No pay?
  • 6. Can you suggest why slaves were mainly found in these areas? The shaded area represents where slaves were most common US Free and Slave States
  • 7. Can you suggest why slaves were mainly found in these areas? The shaded area represents where slaves were most common US Free and Slave States Plantation Slavery in Southern States. The south-eastern states with their fertile soil and hot climate were suitable for large cotton plantations operated by slave labour. Slaves were imported to the east coast of the USA and so the cotton plantations, where the Negro slaves were worked often to death, spread westward.
  • 8. SLAVE LABOUR IN THE DEEP SOUTH. The possibility of being "sold south" was no empty threat. Slaves in the lower South were often ill housed, ill fed, and ill cared for. It was more profitable to keep them at work on cotton than allow them time to build a decent shelter.
  • 9. The treatment of slaves was brutal. Chaining and whipping were common. Seven or ten years in the cotton fields were usually enough to kill a slave. Both men and women slaves were expected to toil in the fields from "first light" to "full dark." Because men were stronger and able to work harder, the plantations often had a much larger number of male slaves than female. This made the possibility of marriage problematic for the slave men.
  • 10. Look at these living conditions… Who would live in a house like this? (IT IS FROM A PLANTATION!)
  • 11. Now look at these homes….  Who would live in a house like this?  How is it different from the previous house?  Can you point out any of the positive aspects of the house?
  • 12. What was it like working on a plantation? Diary extracts
  • 13. Why Do Historians Disagree about Life On The Plantations?
  • 14. So, why do historians disagree about the life of people on the plantations? Historian One: Life on the Plantations was easy for the slaves. They got to work outside in the pleasant sunshine and spent time with their families. Historian Two: Life on the Plantations was hard, back breaking work. Slaves were often treated badly and had little time to look after their families.
  • 15. We all interpret evidence in different ways  Story writers, historians, artists, museums.  History is always changing!  Beware of interpretations – they can be wrong.
  • 16. Beware of BIAS. This is when a person only considers one side of the story. Why might they do this?  Liverpool 1 Man Utd 0  Liverpool battered the devils in a fantastic match. Man Utd were useless. Written By A.Scouser (from Liverpool)
  • 17. Look at this picture……. What might be happening in this picture? Could you be mistaken? Might it be something else?
  • 18. Examine this scene. How do they look? What are their clothes like? What do you think they have been doing? How old are they? How do you think they are feeling?
  • 19. Why do historians disagree about life on the plantations?  Bias affects our judgment.  Evidence can be looked at in several ways.  Opinions are our personal views on a subject.  Let’s try to be biased to show how historians can disagree with each other………..  Split into two groups – Diary extract – historian one and two. Use the sources to create a biased view of life on the plantations
  • 20. Evidence
  • 21. You can also use written sources. The slaves got their allowance every Monday night of molasses, meat, corn meal, and a kind of flour called "dredgings" or "shorts." Perhaps this allowance would be gone before the next Monday night, in which case the slaves would steal hogs and chickens. Then would come the whipping-post. Master himself never whipped his slaves; this was left to the overseer. We children had no supper, and only a little piece of bread or something of the kind in the morning. Our dishes consisted of one wooden bowl, and oyster shells were our spoons. This bowl served for about fifteen children, and often the dogs and the ducks and the peafowl had a dip in it. Sometimes we had buttermilk and bread in our bowl, sometimes greens or bones. ‘Narrative of the sufferings of Lewis Clark 1845’
  • 22. (2) Francis Fredric, Fifty Years of Slavery (1863) Slaves every Monday morning have a certain quantity of Indian corn handed out to them; this they grind with a handmill, and boil or use the meal as they like. The adult slaves have one salt herring allowed for breakfast, during the winter time. The breakfast hour is usually from ten to eleven o'clock. The dinner consists generally of black-eyed peas soup, as it is called. About a quart of peas is boiled in a large pan, and a small piece of meat, just to flavour the soup, is put into the pan. The next day it would be bean soup, and another day it would be Indian meal broth. The dinner hour is about two or three o'clock; the soup being served out to the men and women in bowls; but the children feed like pigs out of troughs, and being supplied sparingly, invariably fight and quarrel with one another over their meals. 5) Annie L. Burton, Memories of Childhood's Slavery Days (1909) The slaves got their allowance every Monday night of molasses, meat, corn meal, and a kind of flour called "dredgings" or "shorts." Perhaps this allowance would be gone before the next Monday night, in which case the slaves would steal hogs and chickens. Then would come the whipping-post. Master himself never whipped his slaves; this was left to the overseer. We children had no supper, and only a little piece of bread or something of the kind in the morning. Our dishes consisted of one wooden bowl, and oyster shells were our spoons. This bowl served for about fifteen children, and often the dogs and the ducks and the peafowl had a dip in it. Sometimes we had buttermilk and bread in our bowl, sometimes greens or bones.