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Workshop 2 Presentation: Education & Community Building

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Workshop 2 Presentation

Workshop 2 Presentation

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  • 1. & WORK -SHOP 2 EDUCATION COMMUNITY BUILDING 10 December 2011
  • 2. Lathrop Working Group Revitalization Vision ENGAGE CREATE SUSTAIN BUILD A Diverse Connected Neighborhood Home To Safe Healthy Families Who are Enduring, Rooted and Empoweredand Enjoy Sustainable Affordability and Opportunity
  • 3. LATHROP WORKING GROUP REVITALIZATION VISION U INTERESTED PARTY OUTREACH MEETINGS & OPEN HOUSE C FEBRUARY 2011 KICK OFF MEETING N O V E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 11 WORKSHOP #1 WORKSHOP #2 WORKSHOP #3THE GREENING OF LATHROP EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY LIVABLE COMMUNITIES D E C E M B E R 2 0 11 DECEMBER 08, 2011 DECEMBER 10, 2011 DECEMBER 13, 2011 COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY MASTER PLANNING PROCESS COMMUNITY EDUCATION ADVISORY NETWORK PLANNING PROCESS PRESENTATION OF LATHROP HOMES 2012 MASTER PLAN UrbanWorks
  • 4. LATHROP WORKING GROUP REVITALIZATION VISION INTERESTED PARTY OUTREACH MEETINGS & OPEN HOUSE KICK OFF MEETING WORKSHOP #1 WORKSHOP #2 WORKSHOP #3THE GREENING OF LATHROP EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY LIVABLE COMMUNITIES DECEMBER 08, 2011 DECEMBER 10, 2011 DECEMBER 13, 2011WORKSHOP GOALS:1. FOR PARTICIPANTS TO GAIN KNOWLEDGE OF SPECIFIC TOPICS BEING DISCUSSED2. TO CREATE AN EVEN PLAYING FIELD FOR ALL PARTICIPATING IN THE PLANNING PROCESS3. TO REMOVE LANGUAGE & TECHNICAL TERMINOLOGY BARRIERS BETWEEN THE LCP TEAM AND PARTICIPANTS COMMUNITY MASTER PLANNING PROCESS UrbanWorks © 2011
  • 5. LATHROP WORKING GROUP REVITALIZATION VISION INTERESTED PARTY OUTREACH MEETINGS & OPEN HOUSE KICK OFF MEETING WORKSHOP #1 WORKSHOP #2 WORKSHOP #3THE GREENING OF LATHROP EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY LIVABLE COMMUNITIES DECEMBER 08, 2011 DECEMBER 10, 2011 DECEMBER 13, 2011WORKSHOP GOALS:1. TO GAIN KNOWLEDGE OF SPECIFIC TOPICS BEING DISCUSSED2. TO SHARE A COMMON LEVEL OF INFOMRATION FOR ALL PARTICIPATING IN THE PLANNING PROCESS3. TO REMOVE LANGUAGE & TECHNICAL TERMINOLOGY BARRIERS COMMUNITY MASTER PLANNING PROCESS UrbanWorks © 2011
  • 6. *WORKSHOP #2WORKSHOP #2: EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY BUILDING GOALS: 1. To create a dialogue with students, parents, teachers, principals and neighbors so that they can articulate their shared aspirations for local public schools 2. Craft a vision for Pre-K to 12th grade public school opportunities for all children living in the Greater Lathrop Neighborhood 3. To define how construction can foster community building 4. To define opportunities to maximize local community participation
  • 7. & WORK -SHOP 2 EDUCATION COMMUNITY BUILDING 10 December 2011
  • 8. WORK 2 I Welcome 9:15 am II I See School As... 9:30 am Break-out Session -SHOP EDUCATION III Education What makes an Effective School A Snapshot: CPS in West Lakeview An invitation to Continue the Conversation Break 10:00 am& COMMUNITY IV Community Building: Construction 11:00 am BUILDING V Closing Remarks VI Adjourn 11:45 am 12:00 pm
  • 9. & 2 WORK What Makes An -SHOP Effective School? EDUCATION COMMUNITY Elizabeth Evans, New Voice Strategies Mark Larson, National Louis University LaTonya Maxwell, University of Chicago BUILDING
  • 10. Discussion& WORK -SHOP 2 EDUCATION COMMUNITY GROUND RULES Participate Listen for understanding Respect all opinions Equal right to speak Be mindful of time Focus on the project at hand BUILDING
  • 11. Small Groups& WORK -SHOP 2 EDUCATION COMMUNITY Numbers 1, 2, 3 Numbers 4, 5, 6 STAY HERE FIRESIDE RM (Downstairs) BUILDING Numbers 7, 8 CAFE
  • 12. What Do You Think About Chicagos Schools? • What are you looking for in a school? • How do you know if a school is good? • Who are the people in a school that you rely on for information? • What information about a school is most important to you?
  • 13. & 2 WORK Defining a -SHOP School EDUCATION COMMUNITY Elizabeth Evans New Voice Strategies BUILDING
  • 14. Why is Public Education So Complicated? • We have lots of measures of "success" but we dont really agree on what "success" means • Although we all think of public education as "local responsibility" there are layers of "deciders" • The way we fund public schools makes it hard for each student, or even a school building, to get the ideal amount of money for their education • Strings attached to most of the money and "entitlement" requirements tie the districts hands
  • 15. Measuring Success...A School is NOT a Building, Its a Learning Community What is a Learning Community? • A combination of people, content (curriculum), expectations and student achievement; • We need to define, set goals and evaluate how the parts add up to the whole
  • 16. Measuring Success...A School is NOT a Building, Its a Learning Community • Attitude towards learning = School Culture • The whole informs & creates school culture • The work & accomplishments of students, parents, teachers, principals & other adults in the school • The rigor of the content • The relevance of the schools activities to future job markets for students and current conditions in communities where the schools operate
  • 17. How Do We Quantify School Culture? • University of Chicago developed a framework to both evaluate a schools performance and turn-around under performing schools
  • 18. & 2 WORK How -SHOP Schools Work EDUCATION COMMUNITY Elizabeth Evans, New Voice Strategies Mark Larson, National Louis University LaTonya Maxwell, University of Chicago BUILDING
  • 19. The Five Essential Supports• School Leadership• Professional Capacity• Student-Centered Learning• Instructional Guidance• Communities Ties
  • 20. School Leadership • Principals are catalytic agents for systemic improvement in their building • The "mission control" for a school • They are the guides who keep everyones eyes on the prize: student learning and great teaching • A principal makes sure that all adults understand, agree on and work together on the schools learning culture • Principals support teachers by working for: • Curriculum is consistent between classrooms/grades • Teachers agree on expectations for students work
  • 21. Student-Centered Learning Compliance
  • 22. Student-Centered Learning Compliance •Strategic Compliance: Work is meaningful only insofar as it accomplishes some manufactured end: grade, GPA, etc.
  • 23. Student-Centered Learning Compliance •Strategic Compliance: Work is meaningful only insofar as it accomplishes some manufactured end: grade, GPA, etc. •Ritual Compliance: Work has no meaning to students and is not connected to what does have meaning. Emphasis on minimums. How do I get this over with?
  • 24. Student-Centered Learning Compliance •Strategic Compliance: Work is meaningful only insofar as it accomplishes some manufactured end: grade, GPA, etc. •Ritual Compliance: Work has no meaning to students and is not connected to what does have meaning. Emphasis on minimums. How do I get this over with? •Retreatism: Students are disengaged from current activities. Thinking about other things. See little relevance or importance to the work. Rebellion.
  • 25. Student-Centered Learning Compliance •Strategic Compliance: Work is meaningful only insofar as it accomplishes some manufactured end: grade, GPA, etc. •Ritual Compliance: Work has no meaning to students and is not connected to what does have meaning. Emphasis on minimums. How do I get this over with? •Retreatism: Students are disengaged from current activities. Thinking about other things. See little relevance or importance to the work. Rebellion. •Disengaged From Classroom: Actively engaged in another agenda
  • 26. Student-Centered Learning Engagement
  • 27. Student-Centered Learning Engagement • Students see the activity as personally meaningful
  • 28. Student-Centered Learning Engagement • Students see the activity as personally meaningful • Students level of interest is sufficiently high that they persist in the face of difficulty
  • 29. Student-Centered Learning Engagement • Students see the activity as personally meaningful • Students level of interest is sufficiently high that they persist in the face of difficulty • Students find the task sufficiently challenging and that they will accomplish something of worth by doing it
  • 30. Student-Centered Learning Engagement • Students see the activity as personally meaningful • Students level of interest is sufficiently high that they persist in the face of difficulty • Students find the task sufficiently challenging and that they will accomplish something of worth by doing it • Students emphasis is on optimum performance and on "getting it right" and/or "done well"
  • 31. Student Centered Learning: RelevanceRelationship of School Climate Measures with Course Absences
  • 32. Instructional Guidance • Teachers get information about students work from: Formative Assessments Quick Writes Quizzes Oral Feedback Exit Slips Slates Group Work • Principals make sure that: Curriculum is consistent between classrooms/grades Teachers agree on expectations for students work
  • 33. Professional CapacitySustaining Excellence • Teachers participate in Personal Learning Networks: online, Teacher Talk, teaming (curriculum that cuts across subjects) • Common Language • Draw on Community Resources • Support for teacher learning (Professional Development)
  • 34. Community TiesSchools Must Include Parents And Families • Parents are the most important partner for a school • Parents must be welcome in the school • Parents must buy into the educational goals set by the school • Schools have to have deliberate strategies for making this happen • Schools must work with a students support network
  • 35. Community TiesSchools Must Involve The Community • Schools must forge relationships with local businesses, community groups and parks to arrange for more resources for students and their families • Schools efforts to engage parents and partners & provide opportunities for them to work in the school
  • 36. & 2 WORK A Snapshot: CPS -SHOP in West Lakeview EDUCATION COMMUNITY Elizabeth Evans, New Voice Strategies Mark Larson, National Louis University LaTonya Maxwell, University of Chicago BUILDING
  • 37. Following the Money • Over$17 billion spent on K-12 public schools in Illinois every year • 62% Local, 30%, State, 8% Fed • Among the lowest state contribution levels in the country • Federal funding for K-12 $860 million • Per pupil in 862 school districts, the average is about $8700 • Low: less than $5000 per student • High: $20,000 per student • Chicago Public Schools spend $5.2 billion a year on school operations & $1.2 billion a year on "bricks & mortar" • $11,000 per pupil average BUT...
  • 38. Chicago Public Schools:3rd Largest School System in the Country 409,300 Students • 45% African America, 41% Latino, 9% Caucasian, 3% Asian, >1% Native American • 86% low income families (measured by student eligibility for subsidized food service) • 12% limited English language proficiency 21,300 Teachers • 30% African-American, 50% white, 16% Latino • $74,839 average teacher salary • $120,659 average administrator salary 675 Schools • 482 elementary schools, 122 high schools
  • 39. High Schools in Greater West Lakeview Alcott High School
  • 40. Elementary Schools in Greater West Lakeview Jahn Schneider Prescott
  • 41. A Snapshot:What is the Status of the Public Schools Near Lathrop? • Three schools within 1 mile radius of redevelopment site: Two elementary schools, one small high school • All three have reenergized parent networks and embrace the opportunity redevelopment presents to anchor neighborhood discussion about public education vision for the future together • Other nearby elementary schools with long-standing active parent networks • Lakeview High School & Lane Tech are large high schools nearby
  • 42. A Snapshot:What is the Status of the Public Schools Near Lathrop? Lane Tech High School WARD 47ndustrial Corridor WARD 32 IRVING PARK ROSCOE VILLAGE I 1M HAMLIN PARK Schneider Elementary SOUTHDALE LAKEVIEW WARD 1 Green LATHROP Exchange HOMESSQUARE WEST DEPAUL WARD 35 BUCKTOWN California Ave. Western Ave. Ashland Ave. Damen Ave.
  • 43. A Snapshot:What is the Status of the Public Schools Near Lathrop?ndustrial Corridor Lane Tech High School WARD 47 A 47 WARD 32 A Alcott High School Small high school, far from its IRVING PARK elementary feeder GE ROSCOE VILLAGE Only k-12 school in CPS besides Ogden 232 students 83 I 1M HAMLIN PARK 43% African American, 41% Latino Schneider Ele e tary neider Elementary d y 72% SOUTH income families lowT 18% special education studentsDALE LAKEVIEW V WARD 1 Green LATHROP Exchange HOMESSQUARE WEST DEPAUL WARD 35 BUCKTOWN California Ave. Western Ave. Ashland Ave. Damen Ave.
  • 44. A Snapshot:What is the Status of the Public Schools Near Lathrop? Lane Tech High School WARD 47ndustrial Corridor WARD 32 IRVING PARK ROSCOE VILLAGE I 1M HAMLIN PARKDALE Schneider Elementary SOUTH T LAKEVIEW V Prescott Elementary School WARD 1 PreK-8 Green Exchange LATHROP HOMES 157 students 239 74.5% Latino, 11.5% WhiteSQUARE 90.4% low income families 16% special education students W S WEST AU DEPAUL 19% English Language Learners WARD 35 BUCKTOWN California Ave. Western Ave. Ashland Ave. Damen Ave.
  • 45. A Snapshot:What is the Status of the Public Schools Near Lathrop? Lane Tech High School WARD 47 A 47 WARD 32 A Jahn Elementary Schoolndustrial Corridor IRVING PARK PreK-8 - 8th grade ROSCOE VILLAGE 393 students 489 91% Latino, 9% White I 1M HAMLIN PARK 86.5% low income families Schneider Elementary ementary y 13.5% special education students SOUTH T 17% English Language LearnersDALE LAKEVIEW V WARD 1 Green LATHROP Exchange HOMESSQUARE WEST DEPAUL WARD 35 BUCKTOWN California Ave. Western Ave. Ashland Ave. Damen Ave.
  • 46. & 2 WORK Chicago -SHOP Public Schools EDUCATION COMMUNITY Margo DeLey, CPS Office of Academic Enhancement BUILDING
  • 47. CPS Offers a Wide Range of Options Elementary School Options • Magnet Schools and Programs (Lottery) Magnet Schools Magnet Cluster Schools (neighborhood) Open Enrollment Schools (neighborhood) • Selective Enrollment Elementary Schools (Testing) Academic Centers Classical Schools International Gifted Program Regional Gifted Centers Regional Gifted Centers for English Language Learners
  • 48. CPS Offers a Wide Range of Options Two Ways to Apply • Online at www.apply.cps.edu • Submit Paper Application to OAE 125 South Clark Street, 4th Floor Chicago, IL 60603 Deadline: December 16, 2011 773.553.2060 www.cpsoae.org
  • 49. & 2 WORK An Invitation to EDUCATION COMMUNITY Continue the -SHOP Conversation Elizabeth Evans, New Voice Strategies eevans.nvs@gmail.com BUILDING
  • 50. Please Join:The Lathrop Neighborhood Education Network • Be part of a Community Conversation with three public schools closest to the Lathrop Site • Participate in building a vision for neighborhood schools in the area now and after revitalization of Lathrop Homes • Work with your fellow neighbors and professional educators to create a school visiting guide for any parent or neighbor
  • 51. Please Join:The Lathrop Neighborhood Education Network • Support the principals of the three schools in serving the students in the area • Engage CPS and CHA from the neighborhood perspective
  • 52. Please Join:The Lathrop Neighborhood Education Network • The Education Network will meet monthly in the Spring • Meetings will be before school, so that teachers and principals may participate • Meetings will rotate between Alcott High & Jahn and Prescott Elementary Schools
  • 53. & WORK -SHOP 2 EDUCATION COMMUNITY BUILDING 10 December 2011
  • 54. & 2 WORK Community Building: -SHOP Construction EDUCATION COMMUNITY Don Biernacki, Related Midwest Michael Houston, Ardmore Associates BUILDING
  • 55. How Do We Build A Community?Don Biernacki, Related Midwest
  • 56. WORK-SHOP 2 I Job Creation Danegza Cordero, Humboldt Construction II Economic Development Ernest Brown, Brown and Momen III MBE/WBE/DBE Participation Rodrigo Perez, Denco IV Community Outreach Dave Alexander, McHugh Construction
  • 57. The Real Foundation Of A Community Is Its People Job Creation, Danegza Cordero, Humboldt Construction • Create sustainable jobs • Our team has trained and placed hundreds of local residents in living- wage union carpentry apprenticeships. • Priority is hiring from within the neighborhood, sponsoring workers throughout their apprenticeships to ensure successful completion
  • 58. The Real Foundation Of A Community Is Its People Economic Development Ernest Brown, Brown and Momen • Focus on hiring locally-based subcontractors • Purchase goods and services provided by local businesses and suppliers • Keep local money circulating within the community
  • 59. A Community Is Built On More Than Bricks And Mortar MBE/WBE/DBE Participation Rodrigo Perez, Denco • Social responsibility comes with our success • Increasing the visibility, viability and employment of minorities and women is an everyday commitment • The evolution of our current subcontractor base is a success
  • 60. A Community Is Built On More Than Bricks And Mortar Community Outreach Dave Alexander, McHugh Construction • Utilize the Community based Organizations • Host Outreach Opportunity Fairs for subcontractors, suppliers and tradesmen • Require large subcontractors to participate in all community programs • Hold art competition for local artists and post the art on project canopies and fences
  • 61. Doing Right And Doing Well Are Not Mutually Exclusive An Innovative Approach Don Biernacki, Related Midwest • LCP Construction Network • We will set the standard early for identifying and maximizing participation of local community
  • 62. The Most Effective Tool For BuildingA Community Is Not A Hammer - Its An Ear Building Our Success Together Michael Houston, Ardmore Associates • Team of experienced contractors with a track record of success • Using our past achievements to inform our success at Lathrop
  • 63. WORK-SHOP 2 Questions & Answers
  • 64. 312.595.7240www.lathropcommunity.org TEXT LCP TO 83936