Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Prose PPT
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Prose PPT

6,021
views

Published on

Overview of Prose for AP Lit at Eastmoor Academy

Overview of Prose for AP Lit at Eastmoor Academy

Published in: Education, Technology

2 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
6,021
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
391
Comments
2
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Transcript

    • 1. Prose What You Should Already KnowWri tten in Pa ragra ph s
    • 2. Types of ProseNonfiction (based on fact rather than on theimagination, although may can contain fictionalelements) -essay, biography, letter, diary,journal, account, autobiography, argument,complaint, etc.Fiction (created from the imagination, notpresented as fact, although it may be a true storyor situation) -short story, novella, novel, fable,fairy tale, myth, etc.
    • 3. Close Reading of ProseDeciphering ProseSOAPSTone (subject, occasion, audience,purpose, speaker, tone)Prose ChartData Sheet
    • 4. Prose: Elements of Language/ Rhetorical DevicesRepetition: alliteration, anadiplosis, anaphora,antimetabole, assonance, catalog, chiasmus,epanalepsis, epistrophe, internal rhyme,parallelism, sibilance
    • 5. Prose: Elements of Language/ Rhetorical DevicesRhetorical/Organizational/Reasoning:ambiguity, analogy, anecdote, aphorism,aposiopesis, catalog, didactic, digression, epithet,ethos, pathos, logos, hendiadys, juxtaposition,understatement/litotes, oxymoron, paradox,parallelism, rhetorical question, shift, syllogism,zeugma, organizational pattern (chronological,spatial, climactic, cause/effect, comparison/contrast, deductive/inductive reasoning,classification, problem-solution)
    • 6. Prose: Elements of DictionLevels of Dictionhigh/formal-contains language that creates an elevated tone. It is freeof slang, idioms, colloquialisms, and contractions. It often containspolysyllabic words, sophisticated syntax and elegant words.neutral- uses standard language and vocabulary without elaborate wordsand may include contractionsinformal/low- language of everyday use; relaxed and conversational;common and simple words, idioms, slang, jargon and contractions
    • 7. Prose: Elements of DictionTypes of Dictionslang-recently coined words that come and go quickly; used in informalsituationscolloquial- nonstandard expressions, often regional, used in informal orconversational speech and writingjargon-words characteristic to a particular professiondialect- nonstandard subgroup of language with its own vocabulary andgrammatics; can reveal region, economics, class; words are misspelled toaccentuate the way the words soundabstract- denotes intangible ideas, emotions, conditions, or conceptsconcrete- specific words that describe physical qualities/conditionsdenotationconnotation
    • 8. Prose: Elements of SyntaxTypes and Patterns of Sentencestelegraphic-shorter than five wordsshort-approximately five words in lengthmedium-approximately 18 words in lengthlong and involved-30 words or more in length
    • 9. Prose: Elements of SyntaxTypes and Patterns of Sentencesdeclarative-makes a statementimperative-gives a commandinterrogative-asks a questionexclamatory-emphasizes or expresses strong emotion
    • 10. Prose: Elements of SyntaxTypes and Patterns of Sentencessimple-one independent clausecompound-two independent clausescomplex-one independent clause and at least one dependent clausecompound-complex-two independent clauses and at least onedependent clause
    • 11. Prose: Elements of SyntaxTypes and Patterns of Sentencesloose or cumulative-makes sense if brought to a close before the actualendingperiodic-makes sense fully only when the end of the sentence is reached(usually very long with much punctuation)balanced-phrases and clauses balance each other by likeness, structure,meaning or lengthasyndeton-deliberate omission of conjunctions in a series of relatedclausespolysyndeton-deliberate use of many conjunctions for emphasis
    • 12. Prose: Elements of SyntaxTypes and Patterns of Sentencesnatural order-subject comes before the predicateinverted order-predicate comes before the subjectrhetorical fragment-fragment used deliberately for purpose/effectrhetorical question-not meant to be answered
    • 13. Prose: Elements of SyntaxSyntactical Devices-parallelism, juxtaposition,repetition, anaphora, chiasmus, antimetabole,zeugma
    • 14. Prose: Elements of Structure/ Storytelling Techniques Elements of Plot: the series of related events in a story; it must involve conflict and resolution of conflict; must figure out protagonist, antagonist, type of conflict, exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, denouement, turning point
    • 15. Prose: Elements of Structure/ Storytelling Techniques Point of View: vantage point from which a story is told; can be participant or nonparticipant; can change throughout story Participant Points of View: first-person; innocent eye Nonparticipant Points of View: third-person; third-person omniscient, third-person limited omniscient, third-person objective, second- person
    • 16. Prose: Elements of Structure/ Storytelling Techniques Structural Elements for Storytelling: flashback, foreshadowing, framing device, shift, chapters, books, paragraphs, paragraph supports (quotations, citations, details, diction, etc.), motif, parody
    • 17. Prose: Elements of CharacterizationCharacterization: the process by which thewriter reveals the personality of the characterindirect characterization-what the charactersays, does, thinks, has, wears; where they are;the people with whom they associate; whatothers say and think about themdirect characterization-author’s directstatements
    • 18. Prose: Elements of CharacterizationTypes of Character: narrator, flat, round,static, dynamic, major, minor, protagonist,antagonist, archetypal
    • 19. Prose: Elements of SettingSetting: the historical time and place, and the socialcircumstances in the “world” of the literature; rarelyisolated; can affect structure, symbol, irony, tone, mood,archetype and charactergeographic location-topography, scenery, room layout/furniture,buildings, stage set or design; physical dimensionscultural backdrop/social context/time period-occupations/workingconditions, way of life, way of talking and behaving, clothing, genderroles, traditions, habits, attitudes, customs, beliefs, values, speechpatterns, laws, past present and futureartificial environment-rooms, buildings, cities, towns, villages, futuristicsettingsprops-tools, implements, gadgets, clothing/costumes, furniture
    • 20. Prose: Elements of StyleStyle:the characteristic manner of expression ofa writer or text. INCLUDES diction, syntax,figurative language, imagery, tone, details,parallelism, rhetorical devices, etc.How to Ascertain Style: First look at syntaxand diction, then pay attention to patterns in allother elements
    • 21. Prose: Elements of ThemeTheme: the insight about human life revealed inliterature; not one or two words. The theme isnot “love” it is “humans go to great lengths to beloved.”How to Ascertain Theme: First know plotwith conflict, characterization, imagery, andauthor’s tone; then identify the subject in oneword and explain in one or two sentences whatthe author says about the subject.
    • 22. Prose: Elements of ToneTone: the author’s (sometimes the speaker’s)attitudeHow to Ascertain Tone: DIDS (diction-LEAD), imagery (appeals to understandingthrough senses), details (facts included andomitted), syntax (how does sentence structureaffect mood?)
    • 23. Prose: Elements of ToneTypes of Tone: you must develop a tonevocabulary--continue making tone groupings.Here are some areas to focus on: happy,thinking, mocking, caring, sad, ironic, objective,angry, conversational, don’t care, etc.
    • 24. Prose: Figurative Languageadynaton, allegory, apostrophe, cliche, conceit,euphemism, hyperbole, idiom, imagery,synesthesia, metaphor, metonymy,personification, pun, simile, synecdoche
    • 25. Prose: General Literary Devicesaesthetics, allusion, archetype, dramaticsituation, irony, mood, motivation, satire, style,symbol, theme, tone, sarcasm