Stickiness How to Make The Perfect  Spit Wad
Stickiness <ul><li>How do we get training to stick? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Retention of the information presented </li></ul...
Stickiness <ul><li>For example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>President Clinton  knew  fidelity was important to both his marriage...
Stickiness <ul><li>What people know, what people do </li></ul><ul><li>Learning styles and approaches to training </li></ul...
Stickiness <ul><li>Learning styles – 3 general types: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auditory </l...
Stickiness <ul><li>Learning style: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct causal relationship between instruction method and retenti...
Stickiness <ul><li>To insure information and skills retention, primary training methods must involve both visual and audit...
Stickiness <ul><li>Pictures are remembered better than words on tasks of recall and recognition </li></ul><ul><li>Although...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></...
Stickiness <ul><li>The permanent transfer of new concepts and shaping of new behaviors is created by ensuring that these t...
Stickiness <ul><ul><li>It only takes one of the criteria to be missing to have a significant negative impact on the sticki...
Stickiness <ul><ul><li>Maximizing training stickiness requires buy-in to the ten criteria at all levels within an organiza...
Stickiness <ul><ul><li>Like an automobile engine, each moving part (criteria) must work both independently and interdepend...
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Stickiness

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  • When most of us were children, we were exposed to spit wads. Whether it was in the school lunchroom, home, or with friends, we all know about fighting friendly ‘wars’ with our friends, seeing who could not only create and send the perfect spit wad, but be recognized as a pro in the spit wad department. Spit wads were of several types, but the two kinds that made the most impact on others were the ones that stung momentarily and fell to the ground, and the ones that stung, stuck, and never came off where they landed leaving a distinct memory and impression. Making the perfect spit wad requires specific knowledge and several skills: Ability to select the proper component type of paper Ability to know how to chew it Ability to know when the proper amount of moisture (spit) needed to be applied Ability to know when the proper consistency occurred to make it perfect Ability to place it in the proper quantity in the straw Ability to aim the straw Ability to apply the right amount of breath to propel it out of the straw It was that precise blend of abilities that made one famous in the spit wad department. If you fell behind in any one of these, or the combinations didn’t flow right, you either practiced more, or suffered the taunts of those you fought with. Becoming famous as a spit wad technician required practice, practice, and more practice. You never wanted to be embarrassed when place into a situation requiring these skills. Training is much like becoming a pro at making that perfect spit wad.
  • Stickiness

    1. 1. Stickiness How to Make The Perfect Spit Wad
    2. 2. Stickiness <ul><li>How do we get training to stick? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Retention of the information presented </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Putting skills into practice in a live environment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Two very different concepts </li></ul><ul><li>One does not necessarily follow the other: </li></ul>
    3. 3. Stickiness <ul><li>For example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>President Clinton knew fidelity was important to both his marriage and his career and he knew what fidelity was. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What he did, or course, was a different story. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Another: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I know that I’m supposed to keep my head down when I play golf, but……… </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Stickiness <ul><li>What people know, what people do </li></ul><ul><li>Learning styles and approaches to training </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Because of learning styles differ, retention will vary when the instructional approach is tied to a specific learning style </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Stickiness <ul><li>Learning styles – 3 general types: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auditory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tactile/Kinesthetic </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Stickiness <ul><li>Learning style: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct causal relationship between instruction method and retention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In order to maximize retention with a mixed group of learners, all three learning styles must be addressed/used </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Stickiness <ul><li>To insure information and skills retention, primary training methods must involve both visual and auditory elements. This reaches 65% of learners. </li></ul>1% 7 Auditory/Tactile 2% 12 Kinesthetic/Tactile 3% 14 Kinesthetic/Auditory 4% 23 Visual/Kinesthetic 6% 35 Visual/Tactile 10% 54 Kinesthetic 10% 57 Tactile 13% 76 Auditory/Visual 22% 123 Auditory 29% 167 Visual Percentage # of Students Learning Style
    8. 8. Stickiness <ul><li>Pictures are remembered better than words on tasks of recall and recognition </li></ul><ul><li>Although 65% of learners are visual or auditory, tactile and kinesthetic methods are required to create stickiness </li></ul><ul><li>Getting hands-on experience is even better than pictures </li></ul>
    9. 9. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The more relevant, the more likely it is to be retained </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If information addresses a current need, recall is better </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Remembering a PIN number vs a license plate number </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Words as well as pictures are read and understood faster when preceded by a related context </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Picture the word ‘butter’ coming after the word ‘bread’ rather than the word ‘doctor’ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Picture the word ‘dish‘ coming after the word ‘satellite‘ rather than the word ‘ladder‘ </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Training that focuses on fewer learning objectives is far more effective than training that “covers a lot of ground” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No more than 50% of material presented should be new – the rest of class time should be devoted to material or activities designed to reinforce the material in the learners’ minds </li></ul></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density – what the research says </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>People who learn and master a skill (A) and then immediately learn and master a second skill (B), performed poorly when skill A was performed 5 hours later </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>People who learned a skill (A), waited 5 hours, learned a second skill (B), and then waited 5 hours were able to perform both skills successfully </li></ul></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The average adult attention span in a learning environment is about 15 minutes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Modules (introducing new materials) within a class should not exceed 15 minutes </li></ul></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Key element in moving information from short-term to long term memory </li></ul></ul></ul>82% 18% After 21 days 79% 21% After 14 days 65% 35% After 7 days 46% 54% After 1 day % Forgotten % Remembered Time from 1 st Learning
    15. 15. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Regular reinforcement of information is critical to combat this fading effect </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Memory increases gradually with successive repetitions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The spacing of these repetitions is important as well </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Consistency in the message is necessary to avoid confusion </li></ul></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I hear and I forget. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I see and I remember. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I do and I understand. - Confucius </li></ul></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The more compelling the motivation (reason for doing it) the more likely the skill will be applied. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Internal motivators (pride, loyalty, integrity, etc) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>External motivators (contests, positive reinforcement, $$$) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The most effective external motivator is establishing non-negotiable performance standards and framing those standards with positive and negative consequences </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Standards have to be set and consistently maintained by a Supervisor </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The new behavior becomes expected and nothing less is acceptable. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The more we are confident in our skills, as well as our ability to execute them, the more comfortable we will be trying them </li></ul></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>People are more likely to continue trying to develop more skills when they are being consistently assisted and encouraged . This requires coaching , and the attention of direct supervisors. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    21. 21. Stickiness <ul><li>Common Denominators to Creating Stickiness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>People are more likely to continue an action when they see positive results to the action. This requires coaching and continuous feedback. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Stickiness <ul><li>The permanent transfer of new concepts and shaping of new behaviors is created by ensuring that these ten criteria are met: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relevance and Relatedness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Low density </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Short modules, short classes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repetition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Stickiness <ul><ul><li>It only takes one of the criteria to be missing to have a significant negative impact on the stickiness of a training program. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Stickiness <ul><ul><li>Maximizing training stickiness requires buy-in to the ten criteria at all levels within an organization </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. Stickiness <ul><ul><li>Like an automobile engine, each moving part (criteria) must work both independently and interdependently toward a common goal </li></ul></ul>

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