Music Across Cultures: Pitch and Tuning

  • 936 views
Uploaded on

A presentation delivered by Nads Hassan (http://nadshassan.com) at Interesting Monday #3.

A presentation delivered by Nads Hassan (http://nadshassan.com) at Interesting Monday #3.

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
936
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide















Transcript

  • 1. Music Across Cultures- Pitch and Tuning Nads Hassan
  • 2. What is music? A form of art, who’s medium is sound. What makes a sound music and not noise? • Pitch • Rhythm
  • 3. What is music? A form of art, who’s medium is sound. What makes a sound music and not noise? • Pitch (melody, harmony) • Rhythm (tempo, meter, articulation) • Dynamics, timbre
  • 4. Watch these people sing • What do they have in common?
  • 5. Pentatonic Scale • All the songs were based on the same five notes. • These form the pentatonic scale • Easily played – black keys on keyboard.
  • 6. Pentatonic Scale • These notes form the basis of melody around the world. • Human instinct – Bobby McFerrin at the World Science Festival ‘09 • Used to introduce children to music – toy xylophones etc • Uses in film music, religious music and ‘anthemic’ music
  • 7. Scales • Selection of notes used to form melodies • Notes you choose • How high or low they are • The pattern they make when they are played together
  • 8. Scales • What’s the distance between them? • Placed too close together, it’s difficult to distinguish between notes • Think of rungs on a ladder
  • 9. Scales • Western scales has 12 rungs -each is called a semitone • Arabic Maqqam (‫ﻣﻘﺎﻡ‬‎) has 12- each is called a quarternote • Chinese and Indian music have potentially much more
  • 10. Pitch • Tells you how high or low each note is • Every 12th rung is an octave • The sequence continues • C4, C5, C6 etc
  • 11. How do we get these notes? • Sine Waves • Height the wave (amplitude) is loudness • Frequency (oscillations) is pitch
  • 12. How do we get these notes? • Decided that A=440Hz • Whole octave (12 rungs) doubles to 880Hz • Split evenly between each octave
  • 13. Other systems • Other cultures follow the same octave rule but split notes differently. • Microtonal music – notes smaller than the ‘rungs’ of western scales, not playable on a keyboard • Sound strange and out of tune to an ear not used to it
  • 14. Thank You www.nadshassan.com @nadshassan