What the World Eats?By Peter Menzel and Faith D'Aluisio-Part 2

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What the World Eats?By Peter Menzel and Faith D'Aluisio-Part 2

  1. 1. Solange Da Silva Correia, a rancher’s wife, with family members in their house overlooking the Solimoes River, with her typical day’s worth of food. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her day's worth of food on a typical day in the month of November was 3400 kcals. She is 49 years of age; 5 feet 2.5 inches tall; and 168 pounds. She and her husband, Francisco (sitting behind her, at right), live outside the village of Caviana with three of their four grandchildren in a house built by his grandfather. They raise cattle to earn income— and sometimes a sheep or two to eat themselves—but generally they rely on their daily catch of fish, and eggs from their chickens, for animal protein. They harvest fruit and Brazil nuts on their property and buy rice, pasta, and cornmeal from a store in Caviana. They also purchase Solange’s favorite soft drink made from guarana—a highly caffeinated berry indigenous to the country.
  2. 2. Abdel Karim Aboubakar, a Sudanese refugee, with his day's worth of food in the Breidjing Refugee Camp in eastern Chad near the Sudanese border. (From the book What I Eat; Around the World in 60 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food on a typical day in the month of November was 2300 kcals. He is 16 years of age; 5 feet 9.5 inches tall; and 110 pounds. He escaped over the border from the volatile Darfur region of Sudan into eastern Chad with his mother and siblings, just ahead of the Janjawiid militia that were burning villages of ethnically black African Sudanese. Like thousands of other refugees, they were accepted into the camp program administrated by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Their meals are markedly similar to those they ate in their home country—there's just less of it. They eat a grain porridge called aiysh, with a thin soup flavored with a dried vegetable or sometimes a small chunk of dried meat if Abdel Karim's mother has been able to work in a villager's field for a day or two.
  3. 3. Alamin Hasan, a porter at the Kamalapur Railway Station in Dhaka, Bangladesh, with his day's worth of food. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food on a typical day in December was 1400 kcals. He is 12 years of age; 4 feet, 7 inches tall; and 68 pounds. His father left the family a few months ago, and his mother is struggling under the weight of a house loan that couldn't be paid back. Alamin says that there wasn't enough to eat, which is why he jumped atop a train in the railway station in Rangpur and traveled south to Dhaka to find work. He sleeps on a bench along with many other young boys in the same straights. He buys food from the local sidewalk vendors who cater to the impoverished in the city. They charge him about 20 Taka (0.30 USD) for a plate of rice and vegetable curries. He can earn about 50 to 80 Taka a day carrying bags, but there is always the danger that older boys and official train coolies will beat him and steal his money. He went to sleep one night a week after he arrived, and awakened to find that the 50 Taka in his pocket had been stolen.
  4. 4. Willie Ishulutak, an Innuit soapstone carver in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada with one day's typical food, and drink. (From the book What I Eat, Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food on a typical day in the month of October was 4700 kcals. He is 29 years of age; 5 feet, 9 inches and 143 pounds. Carving is one of the few traditions of the Inuit that has made the leap into the wage- earning modern world. Willie says he can complete two or three pieces in a day, then sell them in the evening at bars and restaurants in Iqaluit for $100 ($93 USD) each, and sometimes more.
  5. 5. Marble Moahi, a mother living with HIV/AIDS, in the family kitchen in Kabakae Village, Ghanzi, Botswana with her typical day’s worth of food and antiretroviral medications. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her day's worth of food on a typical day in March was 900 kcals. She is 32 years of age; 5 feet, 5 inches tall; and 92 pounds. Despite a decline in new HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa, this region of the world remains the most heavily impacted by HIV/AIDS.
  6. 6. Maria Ermelinda Ayme Sichigalo, a farmer and mother of eight with her typical day’s worth of food in her adobe kitchen house in Tingo village, central Andes, Ecuador. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her typical day's worth of food in the month of September was 3800 kcals. She is 37 years of age; 5 feet, 3 inches tall; and 119 pounds. With no tables or chairs, Ermelinda cooks all the family’s meals while kneeling over the hearth on the earthen floor, tending an open fire of sticks and straw. Guinea pigs that skitter about looking for scraps or spilled grain will eventually end up on the fire themselves when the family eats them for a holiday treat. Because there is no chimney, the beams and thatch roof are blackened by smoke. Unvented smoke from cooking fires accounts for a high level of respiratory disease and, in one study in rural Ecuador, was accountable for half of infant mortality.
  7. 7. Shahnaz Begum, a mother of four, outside her home with her microloan-financed cows and her typical day’s worth of food outside her home in the village of Bari Majlish, an hour outside Dhaka. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her day's worth of food for a typical day in December was 2000 kcals. She is 38 years of age; 5 feet 2 inches tall; and 130 pounds. This mother of four was able to earn enough to build several rental rooms next to her home. She and her tenants share a companionable outdoor cooking space and all largely cook traditional Bangladeshi foods such as dahl, ruti (also spelled roti), and vegetable curries. Her cows eat a pile of water hyacinths gathered by her son from a pond beyond the haystack. She and her family don't drink the milk that helps provide their income.
  8. 8. Xu Zhipeng, a freelance computer graphics artist and Internet gamer, with his typical day’s worth of food in his rented chair at the Ming Wang Internet Café in Shanghai, China. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food in June was 1600 kcals. He is 23 years of age; 6 feet, 2 inches and 157 pounds. He lives at his computer station, day and night, sleeping there when he’s tired and showering once a week at a friend’s apartment. His longest continuous game lasted three days and nights. When he tires of gaming at the café he reads fantasy books. “It’s nice to rest your eyes on a book,” he says, even though he’s reading it online. China has more than 300 million Internet users—a number close to the entire population of the United States.
  9. 9. George Bahna, an engineering company executive and martial arts instructor with his day's worth of food at his apartment home in Zamelek, Cairo, Egypt that he shares with his brother. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food on a typical day in the month of April was 4000 kcals. He is 29 years of age; 5 feet, 11 inches tall and 165 pounds. George eats four to five times a day but doesn’t worry about gaining weight because he’s active, working out in a special room in his flat and at the private Gezira Sporting Club near his apartment. The Nile River bisects the cacophonous metropolis of Cairo, home to 17 million people, many of them very poor. Although Egypt’s stock market and gross domestic product have risen steadily for the past four years, the standard of living for the average Egyptian has not. The government continues to provide food subsidies for those in need, creating a sizable budget deficit.
  10. 10. Coco Simone Finken, a teenage vegetarian who lives in the city of Gatineau, Quebec, Canada with her day's worth of food. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her day's worth of food on a typical day in the month of October was 1900 kcals. She is 16, 5' 9.5" and 130 pounds. The family doesn’t own a car, buys organic food if it’s not too expensive, and grows some of their own vegetables in their front yard.
  11. 11. Marcus Dirr, a master butcher with one day's worth of food in his shop in Endingen, Germany, near Freiburg im Breisgau. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his typical day's worth of food in March was 4600 kcals. He is 43 years of age; 5 feet, 9 inches tall; and 160 pounds. Germans are among the biggest meat eaters in Europe, but eat slightly less meat than in decades past.
  12. 12. Huang Neng сonstruction welder , with his typical day’s worth of food in Pudong’s Lujiazui Central Green Park in Shanghai, China. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food on a typical day in June was 4300 kcals. He is 36 years of age; 5 feet, 6 inches tall and 136 pounds. The migrant welder has worked on a dozen trophy skyscrapers on the Huangpu River in Pudong New Area, across the river from old Shanghai. His current project is the Zhongrong Jasper Tower, at far right, which will top out at 48 floors—a short-statured building compared to its neighbors.
  13. 13. Neil Jones, the Director of Operations at the CN Tower in Toronto, Canada, with one day's worth of his typical food in the skypod of the tower. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food on a typical day in June was 2600 kcals. He is 44 years of age; 6 feet, 2 inches tall and 220 pounds. The viewing platform is above the world’s highest revolving restaurant, which revolves 360 degrees. The award-winning restaurant has awe-inspiring views and, for a tourist destination, surprisingly excellent food. The pricey entrance and elevator fee of about $25 per person is waived if you eat at the restaurant, making it cheaper to have lunch than to just see the sights.
  14. 14. Chen Zhen, a university student, with her typical day’s worth of food on Nanjing East Road in Shanghai, China. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her typical day's worth of food in June was 2600 kcals. She is 20 years of age; 5 feet, 5 inches tall and 106 pounds. Although she doesn’t care for noodles or rice, a special rice roll is her favorite snack: black glutinous rice wrapped around youtiao (fried bread), pickled vegetables, mustard greens, and flosslike threads of dried pork. Zhen and her friends eat at KFC about three times a week, something they couldn’t afford without the company’s coupons. Meanwhile, her father and grandparents, who live in a tiny apartment in northeast Shanghai, go without meat during the week so they can afford to share a special meal with Zhen on her weekend visits.
  15. 15. Bruce Hopkins, a Bondi Beach lifeguard, with his typical day’s worth of food in Sydney, New South Whales, Australia. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food on a typical day in the month of February was 3700 kcals. He is 35 years of age; 6 feet tall, and 180 pounds. Hopkins eats moderately, rarely—if ever—eats fast food, and drinks alcohol only when he and his wife go to dinner with friends.
  16. 16. Cao Xiaoli, a professional acrobat, balances on one hand with her day's worth of food at Shanghai Circus World in Shanghai, China. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her day's worth of food on a typical day in June was 1700 kcals. She is 16 years of age; 5 feet, 2 inches tall; and 99 pounds. Cao Xiaoli lives in a room with nine other girls. She started her career as a child, performing with a regional troupe in her home province of Anhui. Now she practices five hours a day, attends school with the other members of her troupe, and performs seven days a week. She says what she likes best about being an acrobat is the crowd’s reaction when she does something seemingly dangerous.
  17. 17. Lan Guihua, a widowed farmer, in front of her home with her typical day’s worth of food in Ganjiagou Village, Sichuan Province, China. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her day's worth of food on a typical day in June was 1900 kcals. She is 68 years of age; 5 feet, 3 inches tall; and 121 pounds. Her farmhouse is tucked into a bamboo-forested hillside beneath her husband’s grave, and the courtyard opens onto a view of citrus groves and vegetable fields. Chickens and dogs roam freely in the packed-earth courtyard, and firewood and brush for her kitchen wok are stacked under the eaves. Although homegrown vegetables and rice are her staples, chicken feathers and a bowl that held scalding water for easier feather plucking are clues to the meat course of a special meal for visitors. In this region, each rural family is its own little food factory and benefits from thousands of years of agricultural knowledge passed down from generation to generation.
  18. 18. João Agustinho Cardoso, a fisherman, in his floating house on a branch of the Solimoes River with his typical day’s worth of food in Manacapuru, Brazil. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food for a typical day in the month of November was 5200 kcals. He is 69 years of age; 5 feet 2.5 inches tall and 140 pounds. João’s new house has no electricity and the toilet is simply the end of the big balsa wood logs the house is floating on. There is, however, running water, and plenty of it, in the half-mile-wide branch of the river they live on. Unfortunately the water is not potable, but it is teeming with fish, including piranha, which can make swimming during the early morning or evening worrisome. The curimata in the photo is just one of dozens of species that makes its way onto João’s table. Absent from his daily diet are any alcoholic or caffeinated beverages, eschewed by his Seventh-day Adventist religion.
  19. 19. Jill McTighe, a mother and school aide, with a day's worth of food on a bingeing day, in her kitchen in Willesden, northwest London, United Kingdom. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of her day's worth of food on a "bingeing" day in the month of September was 12300 kcals. The calorie total is not a daily caloric average. Jill is 31 years old; 5 feet, 5 inches tall; and 230 pounds. Honest about her food addiction replacing a drug habit, Jill joked about being a chocoholic as she enthusiastically downed a piece of chocolate cake at the end of the photo session. Her weight has yo-yoed over the years and at the time of the picture she was near her heaviest; walking her children to school every day was the sole reason she didn’t weigh more. She says this photo experience was a catalyst for beginning a healthier diet for herself and her family. “Do I cook? Yes, but not cakes. I roast. Nothing ever, ever is fat-fried!”
  20. 20. Brewmaster Joachim Rösch with all the food he eats in a typical day at Ganter Brewery in Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany. (From the book What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.) The caloric value of his day's worth of food in March was 2700 kcals. He is 44 years of age; 6 feet, 2 inches tall; and 207 pounds. Joachim’s job requires him to taste beer a number of times during the week, and unlike in wine tasting, he can’t just taste then spit it out: “Once you’ve got the bitter on the back of your tongue, you automatically get the swallow reflex, so down the chute you go,” he says.
  21. 21. A stunning photographic collection featuring portraits of people from 30 countries and the food they eat in one day. In this fascinating study of people and their diets, 80 profiles are organized by the total number of calories each person puts away in a day. Featuring a Japanese sumo wrestler, a Massai herdswoman, world-renowned Spanish chef Ferran Adria, an American competitive eater, and more, these compulsively readable personal stories also include demographic particulars, including age, activity level, height, and weight. Essays from Harvard primatologist Richard Wrangham, journalist Michael Pollan, and others discuss the implications of our modern diets for our health and for the planet. This compelling blend of photography and investigative reportage expands our understanding of the complex relationships among individuals, culture, and food. What the World Eats By Peter Menzel And Faith D'Aluisio,

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