Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
CONJOINT ANALYSIS
By: GROUP -10
Anmol Sahni Chinmay Jagga
Dhruval Dholakia Mayank Sharma
Madhusudan Partani Mudita Maheshw...
What is ConjointAnalysis?
• Definition : Conjoint Analysis is a multivariate technique
developed specifically to understan...
Important Terminology
• Factor: Independent variable the researcher manipulates that
represents a specific attribute
• Lev...
Why use Conjoint Analysis ?
Different Perspectives, Different Goals
• Buyers want all of the most desirable features at lo...
Attributes andLevels
• Attribute: An attribute is a general feature of a
product or service – say size, colour, speed, del...
Understanding Conjoint Analysis
• Conjoint analysis takes these attribute and level
descriptions of product/services by as...
• Researcher can work out numerically (from the responses)
how valuable each of the levels is relative to the others
aroun...
Company’sObjective
How our product/service compares to our
competitors and how we can best optimise the
value we give to t...
Example (cont.) :
Note : Utility values are in brackets. A lower price has a
higher utility.
Phone A
(Our Product)
Phone B...
Estimating Part-worth
• Part-worths are calculated by using:
– Multiple Regression with dummy variables
– ANOVA
– Multinom...
DeterminingAttribute Importance
• Importance of a factor is represented by the
range of its levels (difference between hig...
Assessing PredictiveAccuracy
To examine the ability of the model to predict the
actual choices of respondents:
• We predic...
Designing profiles
Selecting and defining factors and levels
Its important as it determines
-> effectiveness of the profil...
Generalcharacteristicsof factors
1) Communicable
-> sensory and
multimedia effects
included
2) Actionable
-> should be cap...
Issues in defining factors
• Number of factors
• Inter attribute correlation
• Unique role of price
Specification issues regarding
levels
1) Number and balance of levels
2) Range of levels
• Two major key decisions involved in
specifying the model are as follows:-
1) Specifying the composition rule used:-
a) A...
0
1
2
3
4
Level
Prefernce
0
1
2
3
4
0 2 4
Preferenc
e
0
1
2
3
4
5
 Linear model
Quadratic model

 Separate part worth m...
Designing a conjoint analysis
experiment
Stage 1:Objectivesof the conjoint
analysis
• To determine the contributions of predictor
variables and their levels in det...
Requirementsfor a successful conjointanalysis
• Defining the total utility of the object
• all attributes that potentially...
Stage 3:Assumptions Of ConjointAnalysis
 The product is a bundle of attributes.
 Utility of a product is a simple functi...
Stage 4: Estimating the ConjointModel
• Traditional Estimation Approaches:
– For non metric preference measures:
» MONANOV...
• Extension of Basic Estimation Process
– Bayesian Estimation
– Incorporation of additional variables reflecting
character...
Stage 5: Interpretingthe results
• Generally done at disaggregate level
• For aggregate behavior, such as market share,
ag...
ManagerialImplications
Define the object with the optimal
combination of features
Predict market shares of different
objects with different sets ...
Types Of Analysis
AggregateAnalysis
• Used to generally determine
– average part worth of each attribute level across
the entire sample of r...
Segment Analysis
• In most marketing situations, strategies are
based on customer segments
• Cluster analysis used to prod...
ScenarioSimulations
• Conjoint Analysis also helps researchers to
simulate various competitive scenarios
• Scenarios are u...
Comparingconjoint analysis with other
multivariatemodels
• Its decompositional nature
• Specification of the variate
• The...
Compositionalvsdecompositional
techniques
• In compositional models the researcher collects
ratings from the respondent on...
Specifyingthe conjointvariate
• Conjoint analysis employs a variate quite similar in
form to what is used in other multiva...
Separatemodels for eachindividual
• Conjoint analysis can be carried out at the
individual level
• other multivariate meth...
Flexibilityin types of relationships
• Conjoint analysis not limited in types of
relationships required between the depend...
Conjoint Analysis
Conjoint Analysis
Conjoint Analysis
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Conjoint Analysis

15,597

Published on

It is on Conjoint Analysis presented by Radhika Gupta, Shivi Agarwal, Neha Arya, Neha Kasturia, Mudita Maheshwari, Dhruval Dholakia, Chinmay Jaggan Anmol Sahani and Madhusudan Partani of FMG-18A, FORE School of Management

Published in: Business
4 Comments
21 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
15,597
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
4
Likes
21
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Conjoint Analysis is concerned with understanding how people make choices between products or services or a combination of product and service, so that businesses can design new products or services that better meet customers’ underlying needs.
  • In this instance we can see that for this customer, the optimum weight is 80g. 40g is too light and more than 80g is too heavy. In designing a mobile phone for this customer therefore, we can see that there is no benefit in spending development money to bring the weight of the phone below 80g.

    Also, we see that getting the weight right is more than twice as important as looking at the battery life.
  • In this example we are 5 utility points behind the competition. If we reduced the weight of the phone to 160g we would gain 10 utility points which would mean we would expect to be chosen over the competition. Alternatively, we could to reduce the price a little to have the same impact.
  • Although one of the virtues of conjoint is its separate treatment of each individual, the most common first interpretation step is to compute average part worth of each attribute level across the entire sample of respondents to give the analyst an overall feeling for which attributes are generally important and what is the most desired level of each.
  • The averages are useful, convenient, and easy to understand summary measure. In most marketing situations, however, strategies are based on customer segments. There are numbers of alternative approaches to derive segments. Since the value system can be derived for each respondent, a cluster analysis can be used to produce “benefit segments”. Idea behind clusters is to group respondent such that segments have similar within a segment and different across segments. Instead of cluster analysis one may use latent class approach to derive statistically meaningful segments. Another alternative is to look at predefined group of customers based on some prior knowledge about them. For example, current versus prospective customers or heavy versus light volume buyers.
  • Conjoint Analysis also helps researchers to simulate various competitive scenarios and then estimate how the respondents would react to each scenario. A conjoint simulation is an attempt to understand how the set of respondents would choose among a specified set of profiles. The process provides the researcher with the ability to utilize the estimated parts worth in evaluating a number of scenarios consisting of a number of possible combinations of the profiles.
  • Transcript of "Conjoint Analysis"

    1. 1. CONJOINT ANALYSIS By: GROUP -10 Anmol Sahni Chinmay Jagga Dhruval Dholakia Mayank Sharma Madhusudan Partani Mudita Maheshwari Neha Arya Neha Kasturia Radhika Gupta Shivi Aggarwal
    2. 2. What is ConjointAnalysis? • Definition : Conjoint Analysis is a multivariate technique developed specifically to understand how respondents develop preferences for any type of object. • Based on the premise that consumers evaluate the value of an object by combining the separate amounts of value provided by each attribute. • Also known as : o Multi-attribute Compositional Modelling o Discrete Choice Modelling o Stated Preference Research
    3. 3. Important Terminology • Factor: Independent variable the researcher manipulates that represents a specific attribute • Level: Specific non-metric value describing a factor. Each factor must be represented by two or more levels. • Profile : Combination of all possible levels of factors. For ex: 3 factors with 2 levels each will create (2x2x2) i.e. 8 profiles. • Utility: An individual’s subjective preference judgment representing the holistic value or worth of a specific object. • Part-worth: Estimate from conjoint analysis of the overall preference or utility associated with each level of each factor used to define the product or service
    4. 4. Why use Conjoint Analysis ? Different Perspectives, Different Goals • Buyers want all of the most desirable features at lowest possible price • Sellers want to maximize profits by: 1) minimizing costs of providing features 2) providing products that offer greater overall value than the competition Conjoint Analysis is concerned with understanding how people make choices between products or services or a combination of product and service, so that businesses can design new products or services that better meet customers’ underlying needs.
    5. 5. Attributes andLevels • Attribute: An attribute is a general feature of a product or service – say size, colour, speed, delivery time. • Level: Each attribute is then made up of specific levels. So for the attribute colour, levels might be red, green, blue and so on.
    6. 6. Understanding Conjoint Analysis • Conjoint analysis takes these attribute and level descriptions of product/services by asking people to make a number of choices between different products. Example : Would you choose phone A or phone B? Phone A Phone B Weight 200g 120g Battery Life 21 hours 10 hours Price Rs 5000 Rs 8000
    7. 7. • Researcher can work out numerically (from the responses) how valuable each of the levels is relative to the others around it – this value is known as the utility of the level. • We can also compare across attributes to see which attributes make have the greatest impact in making a choice. Utility value for each level of Weight 40 50 35 25 15 40g 80g 120g 160g 200g Relative importance of attributes 45% 35% 20% Weight Price Battery
    8. 8. Company’sObjective How our product/service compares to our competitors and how we can best optimise the value we give to the customer? By Conjoint analysis : We can total up the utility value our product is giving the customer and compare it to the value for the competition
    9. 9. Example (cont.) : Note : Utility values are in brackets. A lower price has a higher utility. Phone A (Our Product) Phone B (Competitor’s Product) Weight 200g (15) 120g (35) Battery Life 21 hours (15) 10 hours (10) Price Rs 5000 (25) Rs 8000 (15) Total Utility 55 60
    10. 10. Estimating Part-worth • Part-worths are calculated by using: – Multiple Regression with dummy variables – ANOVA – Multinomial logit Models • Calculations are done for each respondent separately
    11. 11. DeterminingAttribute Importance • Importance of a factor is represented by the range of its levels (difference between highest and lowest values) divided by the sum of the ranges across all the factors. • This provides relative importance of each attribute based on the range of its part-worth estimates.
    12. 12. Assessing PredictiveAccuracy To examine the ability of the model to predict the actual choices of respondents: • We predict the preference order by summing the part-worths for the profiles and then rank- ordering the resulting scores • Comparing the predictive preference order to the respondent’s actual preference order assesses predictive accuracy
    13. 13. Designing profiles Selecting and defining factors and levels Its important as it determines -> effectiveness of the profiles in the task -> accuracy of results -> managerial relevance
    14. 14. Generalcharacteristicsof factors 1) Communicable -> sensory and multimedia effects included 2) Actionable -> should be capable of being put into practice
    15. 15. Issues in defining factors • Number of factors • Inter attribute correlation • Unique role of price
    16. 16. Specification issues regarding levels 1) Number and balance of levels 2) Range of levels
    17. 17. • Two major key decisions involved in specifying the model are as follows:- 1) Specifying the composition rule used:- a) Additive rule b) Interactive rule 2) Selecting the type of part worth relation ships a) Linear model b) Quadratic model c) Separate part worth model
    18. 18. 0 1 2 3 4 Level Prefernce 0 1 2 3 4 0 2 4 Preferenc e 0 1 2 3 4 5  Linear model Quadratic model   Separate part worth model
    19. 19. Designing a conjoint analysis experiment
    20. 20. Stage 1:Objectivesof the conjoint analysis • To determine the contributions of predictor variables and their levels in determination of consumer preference • To establish a valid model of consumer judgments
    21. 21. Requirementsfor a successful conjointanalysis • Defining the total utility of the object • all attributes that potentially create or detract from the overall utility of the product or service should be included • Specifying the determinant factors • include the factors that best differentiate between the objects
    22. 22. Stage 3:Assumptions Of ConjointAnalysis  The product is a bundle of attributes.  Utility of a product is a simple function of the utilities of the attributes.  Utility predicts behaviour (i.e., purchases). Least restrictive set of statistical assumptions but highly critical conceptual assumptions.
    23. 23. Stage 4: Estimating the ConjointModel • Traditional Estimation Approaches: – For non metric preference measures: » MONANOVA, LINMAP – For metric preference measures: » Multiple regression with dummy variables – For more complex consumer preference measures: » Logit model and its extensions
    24. 24. • Extension of Basic Estimation Process – Bayesian Estimation – Incorporation of additional variables reflecting characteristics of the individuals
    25. 25. Stage 5: Interpretingthe results • Generally done at disaggregate level • For aggregate behavior, such as market share, aggregate analysis more accurate. • Two main things considered in interpretation – Examining the estimated part-worth • Magnitude and pattern of part-worth for each factor • Higher the part-worth, higher the impact on overall utility – Relative importance of attributes • Factor with greatest range of part-woths has greatest contribution to overall utility.
    26. 26. ManagerialImplications
    27. 27. Define the object with the optimal combination of features Predict market shares of different objects with different sets of features Isolate groups of customers who place differing importance’s on different features Identify marketing opportunities by exploring the market potential for feature combos not currently available Show the relative contributions of each attribute and each level to the overall evaluation of the object
    28. 28. Types Of Analysis
    29. 29. AggregateAnalysis • Used to generally determine – average part worth of each attribute level across the entire sample of respondents • This usually helps in determining the – The importance of each attribute – The desired level of each attribute
    30. 30. Segment Analysis • In most marketing situations, strategies are based on customer segments • Cluster analysis used to produce “benefit segments” • Clusters are formed to group respondent such that segments have similar within a segment and different across segments
    31. 31. ScenarioSimulations • Conjoint Analysis also helps researchers to simulate various competitive scenarios • Scenarios are used to estimate how respondents react to various scenarios • It is used to understand how the set of respondents would choose among a specified set of profiles
    32. 32. Comparingconjoint analysis with other multivariatemodels • Its decompositional nature • Specification of the variate • The fact that estimates can be made at individual level • Its flexibility in terms of relationships between dependent and independent variables
    33. 33. Compositionalvsdecompositional techniques • In compositional models the researcher collects ratings from the respondent on many product characteristics and then relates theses ratings to the to some overall preference rating to develop a predictive model • Conjoint analysis a type of decompositional model, differs in that the researcher needs to know only respondents overall preference for a profile.
    34. 34. Specifyingthe conjointvariate • Conjoint analysis employs a variate quite similar in form to what is used in other multivariate techniques. • The conjoint variate is a linear combination of effects of the independent variables (levels of each factor) on a dependent variable. • The important difference is that in the conjoint variate the researcher specifies both the independent variables (factors) and their values (levels).
    35. 35. Separatemodels for eachindividual • Conjoint analysis can be carried out at the individual level • other multivariate methods use each respondent’s measures as a single observation and then perform the analysis using all respondents simultaneously.
    36. 36. Flexibilityin types of relationships • Conjoint analysis not limited in types of relationships required between the dependent and independent variables • Most dependence methods assume that a linear relationship exists • Conjoint analysis can easily handle non linear relationships as well

    ×