Governing Mankind And Govinfo 090723

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  • Welcome to this introductory session to get you started using government information resources. It will take approximately 20 minutes to present and there will be time at the end for practice and questions.
  • Information provided by government is an excellent source to use for your research and can be quite easily found through the library’s online catalogue using the government documents location filter or online using specialized Google search engines
  • In this library there is a separate section that houses most of the collection of government publicationsThere are also special staff who can help you to identify what kinds of information are available and help you track it down
  • Fly in each reason slowly and discuss why this would be useful in a research paper:If you limit your research to books and journals, you are possibly missing out on some of the most current informationGovernments are the primary collectors of statistics on most subjectsAny topic that deals with history or human society in general can be supported by government information resourcesGovernments sponsor a great deal of research on scientific issues
  • These are some of the subject areas that are very well supported by government publications in the library’s collection and online
  • Fly in each statement slowly and give an example of each kind of publication:Debates of the House of Commons (also called Hansard) are available from 1867 onwardsBudgets and Public Accounts – the government’s spending plans and how they actually spent the money are also in this collectionReports of royal commissions like the investigation into the treatment of Maher Arar are hereExample: “Ways of knowing and understanding : towards the convergence of traditional and scientific knowledge of climate change in the Canadian North : a paper prepared for Environment Canada”
  • Click on the link for international organizations to go to the web guide for international organizationsNavigate to the library home page and point out where this guide is found via the subject guides under “additional topics” or via the government information link to “government information subject guides” and “international relations” in the left hand navigation barPoint out the list of links to various international organizations on the “International organizations” subject guide
  • Start at the Library home page and point out the government information home page then click on ‘start’ to go to the government information home pagePoint out the list of specialists in the left hand marginThen highlight the items in the middle column to point out what is on the government information home pageMove to the next slide to look at search engines
  • Note that the top 3 of these search engines were developed here at Carleton.Click on ‘search for government information on the Web’ using the ‘Canadian documents’ button and do a search using ‘education and youth’Then use the provincial filter, because education is a provincial responsibility in Canada, to show how search results can be made more specificDemonstrate the same search using one of the other areasNarrow the search further by using a domain limitation in the search statement. Example for African documents: add domain=za to find only information from Zambia and point out the filters for types of information at the top, e.g. statistics
  • Not all countries have a custom Google search engine. Another option for filtering results is to use the Google advanced search. Try Education and youth within gov.uk. After finding a source that interests you, provide a more specific domain: for example, deni.gov.uk (Northern Ireland Dept. of Education)When using a Google Custom search engine you will see at the bottom of the results page the option to “search within results” and you can specify a domain name, for example add ‘sk.ca’ to a provincial search to find only documents from Saskatchewan.
  • Click on ‘web guides’ and point to ‘government information subject guides’Navigate down the left margin to show the categories of guidesConcentrate on ‘Public Policy Issues” section; select ‘poverty’ and point out navigation links on the left on this guide
  • Click on ‘everything’ and do a catalogue search on ‘education and youth’ first without using a location filter and then redo the search using the location filter ‘government documents’ – note that about half the items are government information resourcesSelect the title “Measuring up” and click on the ‘online text’ link to show how to access online government reports via the OPAC. Note that Carleton puts web links into our catalogue records whenever we can find them but BEWARE that government links are often broken. Use the “Report Access Problems” to et us know if you find a problem and we’ll try to fix it asap.Change the sort to arrange the results by title and click on “The Black youth of Toronto” and note that there isn’t any online version for this publication.Point out the different call number used for government publications in MADGIC, click on the location DDV to show the map of where this publication is found
  • Click on ‘citing’ and navigate to the link in the left hand navigation bar for “Government documents”Note that you can also get to this citation information from the government information home page
  • Click on ‘help you’ and point out the Meebo chat box for online helpAlso point to the list of specialists with their email links in the left navigation menuNote the link to hours

Transcript

  • 1. GOVERNING MANKIND (or, how using government information can raise my grades)
    “All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of youth.” Aristotle
  • 2. This brief session will answer the following questions and introduce you to resources that may set you on the road to governing mankind… or more likely to a better mark
    • Why use government information?
    • 3. What kind of information do governments produce?
    • 4. How do I find the information I need?
    • 5. If I need more, where can I get help?
    WHAT WILL THIS SESSION DO FOR YOU?
  • 6. FIRST A LITTLE MADGIC…
    The Maps, Data and Government Information Centre (MADGIC) on the main floor of the Library is the best place to start your search for government information!
    Today we will concentrate on online resources but remember there is much, much more…
  • 7. Governments generate information on almost every subject you can think of!
    Government information is considered to come from an authoritative source (sometimes influenced by political concerns, of course )
    Government information is often the most current information on a topic
    Governments develop policies and publish legislation, reports, and statistics that support these policies
    BUT WHY SHOULD I USE GOVERNMENT INFORMATION?
  • 8. Architecture / Biology / Business / Canadian Studies / Chemistry / CivilEngineering /Criminology and Criminal Justice / Cultural Mediations / Economics / Environmental Science / Geographyand EnvironmentalStudies / History / Industrial Design / International Affairs / Journalism and Communication / Law / PoliticalScience / Public Policy and Administration / Social Work / Sociology / Women’sStudies
    If you are in any of these programs, government information is for you
  • 9. Information that is collected/published is from:
    • legislatures (bills, statutes, parliamentary debates and committee reports)
    • 10. a department or other administrative operation (annual reports, economic statements such as budgets and public accounts)
    • 11. investigations (commissions of inquiry, task forces)
    • 12. government funded research on policy issues
    Information is also collected by special purpose government sources like Statistics Canada (census) or mapping agencies Natural Resources Canada (maps and atlases)
    WHAT KINDS OF INFORMATION DO GOVERNMENTS PRODUCE?
  • 13. Government information also comes from international organizations whose members are governments such as:
    the United Nations
    the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
    the European Union
    World Bank
    INTERNATIONAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS ARE GREAT FOR COMPARISONS
  • 14. THERE IS SO MUCH INFORMATION, WHERE DO I START?
  • 15. USE THE LIBRARY’S CUSTOM SEARCH ENGINES TO MAKE YOUR WEB SEARCHING EASIER
  • 16. Use filters to narrow a Google search both within the custom search engines and for a general Google search
    Click on ‘advanced search’ or ‘search within results’ to get the option to add a domain name, for example gov.uk (to limit search to British government reports)
    FOR EVEN BETTER RESULTS
  • 17. YOU CAN ALSO USE OUR GOVERNMENT INFORMATION WEB GUIDES FOR SPECIFIC TOPICS
  • 18. DON’T FORGET THAT EVERYTHING ISN’T ONLINE!
  • 19. NEED HELP CITING YOUR GOVERNMENT SOURCES?
  • 20.
    • Working with government information can be confusing
    • 21. Don’t delay! Ask for help as soon as you encounter a problem or if you can’t find what you need
    • 22. You can visit, call, or chat online with staff at the MADGIC information desk or email one of the government information specialists
    • 23. Need help?
    REMEMBER THE LIBRARY STAFF IS HERE TO HELP YOU
  • 24. THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION!
    Please make time to visit MADGIC and take advantage of the valuable resources the library provides for you