The 20 things you should know when designing for classrooms

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The 20 things you should know when designing for classrooms

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The 20 things you should know when designing for classrooms

  1. The 20 things you should know when designing for classrooms.
  2. Co-designing with teachers, for their world
  3. Know where you fit. There are three types of technology teachers need. 1
  4. TECH TEACHING TOOLS TECH THAT AMPLIFIES AND AUGMENTS OTHER TOPICS TECH AS A CURRICULUM SUBJECT
  5. Know who you’re designing for. 2
  6. Focus on what the user needs, not what you think they need. Teachers know the classroom better than anyone else, just as kids know the playground. You will be proven wrong — and that’s a good thing.
  7. Teachers are natural born hackers. 3
  8. Involve teachers across your whole product cycle. They will reward you by adopting your tech and giving it a purpose you couldn’t imagine.
  9. Want teachers to adopt your product instantly? Do your homework. 4
  10. Help schools and teachers satisfy the criteria against which they’re judged. Show teachers how exactly your solution fits with their teaching and learning objectives.
  11. 5 Give teachers an opportunity to feel confident using your tech.
  12. “You wouldn’t expect to teach a whole classroom of kids how to make a cake if you weren’t confident doing it yourself.“ Photo credit: Universe Awareness Clare Copeland Senior Lecturer and the Subject Leader for Computing and Information, London South Bank University
  13. Understanding teachers’ reality
  14. 6 Teachers don’t have time. Make this into an opportunity, not an obstacle.
  15. “I like to be spoonfed and have the opportunity to watch something at home or quickly before the class happens.” ANYWHEREANYTIMEQUICK SIMPLE LOW BARRIER Nadia Raza Teacher and Senco at Al Sadiq & Al Zahra schools
  16. 7 The role of the teacher has changed. The answer to this could well be the next Airbnb for teachers - but better!
  17. community engagement publication of resources and teaching tools professional development portfolio building speaking at conferences CPD certification knowledge exchange brand ambassadors mentoring search for resources and teaching tools teachers rating content recruitment peer endorsement teachers as curators training teacher meetups & seminars
  18. 8 We’re at the point when things like programming can’t be taught by teachers alone.
  19. changes in the job market need to make teaching relevant re-education of teachers CONTINUOUS INNOVATIONindustry input “It’s a lot to ask a teacher to teach the new computing curriculum without training. You wouldn’t do it in any other profession.”
  20. 9 Teachers don’t have much money but they need your tech. What’s your go-to-market strategy?
  21. ?“The already limited budget for technology we have for a year is difficult to spend wisely as you don’t know what tech is going to come out - it’s hard to predict.” “We don’t buy apps. We just do the free ones. Mainly because we find it very difficult to set up volume purchasing. An average school, unless it’s an academy, is not allowed a credit card. In the US, not even a debit card.” WHO MAKES PURCHASING DECISIONS? HOW AND WHEN ARE THEY BEING MADE?
  22. Your typical marketing techniques won’t cut it. 10
  23. Teachers trust other teachers’ expertise and they love to share their stories. Peer-to-peer is the most successful amplifier of a good story amongst educators. Dare to embed this in your business model!
  24. Designing for utility, longevity & adaptability
  25. If your hardware will be used by kids, it needs to be indestructible — things get broken. 11
  26. Expect daily repeated use by many children Nadia Raza Teacher and Senco at Al Sadiq & Al Zahra schools “We’ve got 15 tablets for 400 children. It takes a lot to maintain all the tech we have. Laptops are losing keys, you need to replace batteries, things go missing.”
  27. Ensure tech is used in the way you intended. 13
  28. Photo credit: Kathy Cassidy Isabella Lieghio ICT Education Consultant at Icon Learning, Apple Distinguished Educator “Children should be using the interactive whiteboard to enhance their learning, it’s not the teacher’s tool. Many schools don’t let children touch the boards.”
  29. Nadia Raza Teacher and Senco at Al Sadiq & Al Zahra schools “There was a maths-related app, with questions that come up and kids have to tick the right answer. They’re competing against each other. What I noticed was that they were pressing every answer to get to the right one. As a teacher, it was really depressing because they were not using any maths in a maths lesson. It was teaching them practice of that particular game [alone].”
  30. Tech savviness of children is over-rated. Pedagogy is key with or without tech. 13
  31. FOR ACTUAL LEARNING TO TAKE PLACE, HAS TO BE USEFUL BEYOND THE “WOW” MOMENT. Clare Copeland Senior Lecturer and the Subject Leader for Computing and Information, London South Bank University “Many of my colleagues think the children know everything — they’re digital natives, but they don’t!”
  32. “Our solution teaches kids how to code.” Are you sure? 14
  33. “You’re teaching to that [particular] software and kids find it hard to transfer it to other things.” Nadia Raza Teacher and Senco at Al Sadiq & Al Zahra schools
  34. A good piece of edtech … ACHIEVES LEARNING OBJECTIVES FITS WITH ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK LINKS TO OTHER LEARNING AND REAL LIFE NEEDS
  35. It’s not about an app, it’s what you do with it. 15
  36. sometimes the simplest tool can make THE BIGGEST impact Nadia Raza Teacher and Senco at Al Sadiq & Al Zahra schools “I used an avatar to redirect my authority to kids in a different voice. They didn’t know it was me but they found it fun and interactive. They paid more attention.”
  37. Design for multiple use cases. Make things that become indispensable. 16
  38. “I don’t mind paying for a good app that I can use for different subjects, on different occasions throughout the year.” Isabella Lieghio ICT Education Consultant at Icon Learning, Apple Distinguished Educator
  39. Gamification is not a thing. 17
  40. Play has always been a part of our learning process. Humans are social beings and enjoy engaged learning experiences. However, with all the hype around gamification, don’t forget that your main agenda is to get kids to learn.
  41. Measuring value
  42. 18 Forget ROI. In the classroom, we’re talking VOI.
  43. &VALUE OF INVESTMENT RETURN ON LEARNING How do you measure whether knowledge or a skill was acquired, or a mindset was changed?
  44. This is what you’re up against: proving value to multiple stakeholders in a complex ecosystem 19
  45. Education authorities Examiners School Teachers Parents Students Potential employers
  46. ! LACK OF HARD DATA TECHNOLOGY DOESN’T WORK IN SILOES. OTHER PROCESSES INVOLVED IN TEACHING AND LEARNING PLAY A ROLE, TOO. RAPID PACE OF CHANGE OF TECHNOLOGY TIME IT TAKES FOR ROBUST EVIDENCE TO EMERGE IN EDUCATION
  47. Edtech and the unbearable lightness of impact measurement. 20
  48. “There’s that thing around the impermanence of technology and children’s work. How do you make it tangible to both children and parents – around recording their progress?” Clare Copeland Senior Lecturer and the Subject Leader for Computing and Information, London South Bank University
  49. “What I find difficult about technology is that most of our books are catered for Ofsted, so if you’ve done something with computers, how do you prove that you’ve done that?” Nadia Raza Teacher and Senco at Al Sadiq & Al Zahra schools
  50. education@madebymany.com @tech_du @nikajaneckova

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