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Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
Web evaluation presentation
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Web evaluation presentation

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  • 1. WEBSITE EVALUATION How do I know the information I find is credible, accurate, reasonable, and supportive? By: Madelyn Santiago
  • 2. Why students need to evaluate Internet sources Anyone can put up anything on the Internet.  It is difficult to determine if the information is necessary or valid.  Is the site filtered or reviewed? 
  • 3. CARS Credibility- Check Author’s Purpose  Accuracy- Check the date, grammar, and  spelling Reasonableness- Check the tone & bias  Support- Check the sponsor  Helpful acronym when evaluating a webpage
  • 4. The 5 W’s (and1H) of Cyberspace  Who  What  When  Where  Why  How
  • 5. Who is the source of information? It is important to know who is giving you the information so you know whether to believe and trust that information.  Can you locate the author’s name?-usually at  the top or bottom of the page  Can the author’s credibility be confirmed?
  • 6. What is the information? It is important to know what kind of information you are getting when you are deciding if you should trust the information on a website.  Is the information accurate?  Does the information you are evaluating agree with trusted sources such as an encyclopedia?  Can bias, emotion, persuasion, or alternative viewpoints be identified? 
  • 7. When was the site created? It is important to know if the information is current.  Can you find the date the site was created or last updated?  Are the provided links working and current? 
  • 8. Where are you getting your information from?  The URL (website address) can tell you where your information is coming from. This can help determine if the source of the information is reliable. .com = commercial site .net =e-business .org =not for profit organziations .edu = colleges, universities, and other schools .gov agency of the US government
  • 9. Where are you getting your information from?  The URL (website address) can tell you where your information is coming from. This can help determine if the source of the information is reliable. .com = commercial site .net =e-business .org =not for profit organziations .edu = colleges, universities, and other schools .gov agency of the US government
  • 10. Why was the site created? Knowing why someone created the site can help you know whether to trust the information.  Is the site trying to: Sell something educate/inform get support or sounding off? 
  • 11. How is the site put together?      Is the site well organized? Are there any grammatical errors? Are the links easy to follow? Do you have to register to use the site? Is there a fee?

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