Developing WebQuests

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An overview of WebQuest functionality and how it can be used in the classroom.

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  • Developing WebQuests

    1. 1. Developing WebQuests An overview of WebQuest functionality and utility. Mac Slocum December, 2006 Place photo here
    2. 2. Questions/Topics to be addressed <ul><li>What is a WebQuest? </li></ul><ul><li>What resources are required for WebQuests? </li></ul><ul><li>How can WebQuests be used in the classroom? </li></ul><ul><li>WebQuest subjects: Three examples </li></ul><ul><li>What are the components of a WebQuest? </li></ul><ul><li>Characteristics of good WebQuests </li></ul><ul><li>WebQuest resources </li></ul>
    3. 3. What is a WebQuest? <ul><li>A Web-based lesson that taps into the context and power of the Internet. </li></ul><ul><li>A lesson that incorporates research from a variety of Web sites. </li></ul><ul><li>A lesson that enhances deduction, research and problem-solving skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: (Dodge, 2006) </li></ul>
    4. 4. What resources are required for WebQuests? <ul><li>Computers that can handle basic Web browsing and word processing tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>Internet connections, preferably high-speed. </li></ul><ul><li>Web authoring software (for development). Includes: HTML editor, FTP program, photo editor, audio editor (if necessary), video editor (if necessary). </li></ul><ul><li>Server space on a school network. </li></ul><ul><li>Moderate technical skill. </li></ul>
    5. 5. How can WebQuests be used in the classroom? <ul><li>Students work in teams to complete WebQuest assignments. </li></ul><ul><li>Teams have specific period of time to complete assignment (1 day - 1 month) </li></ul><ul><li>Output: Papers, presentations, and skits. </li></ul>
    6. 6. WebQuest subjects: Three examples <ul><li>Math: Titanic Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>History: Golden Age of Radio </li></ul><ul><li>Science: Alternative Energy Sources </li></ul>
    7. 7. Math WebQuest Example: Titanic <ul><li>Uses historical event as jumping-off point. </li></ul><ul><li>Students research event via online resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Final output: Spreadsheets and databases analyzing event. </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: (McManus, 1998) </li></ul>asterix.ednet.lsu.edu/~edtech/webquest/titanic.html
    8. 8. History WebQuest Example: Radio Days <ul><li>Students assigned roles: Playwright, Foley Artist, Ad Exec. </li></ul><ul><li>Roles put students into first-person historical context. </li></ul><ul><li>Final output: Students create recorded 'radio drama'. </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: (Matzat, 2005) </li></ul>www.thematzats.com/radio/index.html
    9. 9. Science WebQuest Example: Alternative Energy Sources <ul><li>Student teams analyze alternative energy sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Research conducted via online resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Final output: Written report, oral presentation, visual presentation. </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: (Embry, 2005) </li></ul>www.dmrtc.net/~embrys/aesindex.htm
    10. 10. What are the components of a WebQuest? <ul><li>Introduction - Overview of the lesson. </li></ul><ul><li>Task - A series of steps involving research and analysis. </li></ul><ul><li>Process - A description of the learning steps. </li></ul><ul><li>Resources - Links to relevant online resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation - A rubric for the lesson. </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion - A &quot;closing statement&quot; for the lesson. </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher Info - Related guidelines and material for other educators. </li></ul><ul><li>Citations: (Yoder, 1999), (Dodge, 1995) </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>Ties into broader class topic/lesson. </li></ul><ul><li>Well organized. </li></ul><ul><li>Each step leads to the next step. </li></ul><ul><li>Utilizes Web-based resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Clear rubric. </li></ul><ul><li>Easy-to-read with a simple design. </li></ul><ul><li>Citations: (Dodge, 1997), (Yoder, 1999) </li></ul>Characteristics of good WebQuests
    12. 12. <ul><li>The WebQuest Page at San Diego State University </li></ul><ul><li>webquest.sdsu.edu </li></ul><ul><li>WebQuest Portal </li></ul><ul><li>webquest.org </li></ul><ul><li>Schrock Guide: WebQuests </li></ul><ul><li>school.discovery.com/schrockguide/webquest/webquest.html </li></ul>WebQuest resources
    13. 13. <ul><li>Dodge, B (1997). Some Thoughts About WebQuests. Retrieved December 9, 2006, from Some Thoughts About WebQuests Web site: http://webquest.sdsu.edu/about_webquests.html </li></ul><ul><li>Dodge, B (2006). The WebQuest Page at San Diego State University. Retrieved December 9, 2006, from The WebQuest Page at San Diego State University Web site: http://webquest.sdsu.edu/ </li></ul><ul><li>Embry, R (2005). Alternative Energy Sources. Retrieved December 9, 2006, from Alternative Energy Sources Web site: http://www.dmrtc.net/~embrys/aesindex.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Matzat, C (2005). Radio Days: A WebQuest. Retrieved December 9, 2006, from Radio Days: A WebQuest Web site: http://www.thematzats.com/radio/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>McManus, B (1998). Titanic: What Can Numbers Tell Us About Her Fatal Voyage?. Retrieved December 9, 2006, from Titanic: What Can Numbers Tell Us About Her Fatal Voyage? Web site: http://asterix.ednet.lsu.edu/~edtech/webquest/titanic.html </li></ul><ul><li>Yoder, M. B. (1999). The Student WebQuest. Learning & Leading With Technology, [26(7)], 6-9, 52-53. </li></ul>Bibliography

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