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La Casa de Esperanza Young Artists Cultural Awareness Program

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La Casa de Esperanza’s Young Artists Cultural Awareness Project was conceived as an opportunity to show the community the beauty and richness of Latin culture and teach young Hispanic and ...

La Casa de Esperanza’s Young Artists Cultural Awareness Project was conceived as an opportunity to show the community the beauty and richness of Latin culture and teach young Hispanic and non-Hispanic artists the process of developing artwork and explore the medium of oil painting. By teaching the importance of research as the basis for artistic inspiration, along with the craftsmanship of media and technique, we strive to provide a rich and practical experience for young artists who participate in this program.

The project is supported in part by a grant from the Mary L. Nohl Fund of the Greater Milwaukee
Foundation, the Wisconsin Arts Board that receives funds from the state of Wisconsin and the National Endowment of the Arts.

The Cultural Awareness Project is a program of La Casa de Esperanza Inc. in Waukesha. Luis Macharé is the instructor and will be teaching and assisting all participants different techniques and styles of oil painting. Luis is a graduate of the prestigious Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes in Lima, Peru. He built a career that spans three continents, working as an illustrator, cartoonist, fine artist and designer throughout South America, the United States and Europe.

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La Casa de Esperanza Young Artists Cultural Awareness Program La Casa de Esperanza Young Artists Cultural Awareness Program Presentation Transcript

  • The La Casa de Esperanza Young Artists Cultural Awareness Project Celebrating the Culture of Latin America G A L L E R Y
  • Participants 2006-2007 Tas Oszkay Febres Cordero Omar Hernandez Alex Kramer Jessica López Nicholas Rabago The Artistic and Cultural Awareness Project Karina Robles Anais Werkmeister YOUNG ARTISTS PROGRAM La Casa de Esperanza’s Young Artists Cultural Awareness Project was conceived as an opportunity to show the community the beauty and richness of Latin culture and teach young Hispanic and non-Hispanic artists Participants 2008-2009 the process of developing artwork and explore the medium of oil painting. By teaching the importance of research as the basis for artistic inspiration, along with the craftsmanship of media and technique, we strive Sadie Abler to provide a rich and practical experience for young artists who participate in this program. Mary Davidson The project is supported in part by a grant from the Mary L. Nohl Fund of the Greater Milwaukee Natalie Ergas Foundation, the Wisconsin Arts Board that receives funds from the state of Wisconsin and the National Gibran Omar Hernandez Endowment of the Arts. Kevin Keadle The Cultural Awareness Project is a program of La Casa de Esperanza Inc. in Waukesha. Luis Macharé Kevin Lawler is the instructor and will be teaching and assisting all participants different techniques and styles of oil Jessica López painting. Luis is a graduate of the prestigious Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes in Lima, Peru. He built a career that spans three continents, working as an illustrator, cartoonist, fine artist and designer throughout Natalio López III South America, the United States and Europe. Alain Lovaco Philippe Macharé “Teaching children the importance of their natural heritage gives Emily Melendes them a sense of pride ... a feeling of importance and significance Angel Montoya in our society. By educating our children to embrace and accept John Sanchez all ethnicities and cultures, we will create a more productive workforce, great schools and positive, welcoming communities.” Rachel Terrill Samantha Thammahong Anselmo Villarreal Executive Director, La Casa de Esperanza, Inc. Rachel Thiede 410 Arcadian Avenue | Waukesha, WI 53186 | 262-547-0887 | www.lacasadeesperanza.org ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza
  • VeNezUelA “To a White Horse” Luis Macharé Ana Enriqueta Terán is considered one of Venezuela’s finest poets. One of the most celebrated throughout the Spanish-speaking world, she is almost unknown in the United States. Her vivid imagery weaves together fables, myths, dreams, bold similes and heightened visions of reality. This painting is based upon her poem “To a White Horse” from The Poetess Counts to 100 and Bows Out: Selected Poems. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • bOlIVIA “Girl with Llama” Concepts: Nicholas Rabago Artist: Luis Machare The Highland Indian women of Bolivia are recognized by their traditional multilayered skirts called polleras and colorful shawls. Beyond their bold beauty, the shawls are important to daily life. Often worn for warmth, they also are used to carry babies, haul goods to market or carry fresh purchases home – all carefully balanced on the back to keep hands free. Hats complete the outfits. Shapes vary with the different regions of Bolivia and with the marital status of the women ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. who wear them. Llamas are raised for their wool, an important source of income in the Highlands. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • PUeRTO RIcO “A Celebration of Light and Sound” Luis Macharé Musical and historic images combine to create this representation of Puerto Rican culture. The sun reflects on the historic round tower of San Cristóbal Fortress (El Morro) overlooking the Caribbean. Salsa music has become an integral part of Puerto Rican culture and Tito Puente is the first great salsa musician. Born in New York to Puerto Rican parents in 1923, Tito Puente is internationally recognized for his significant contributions to Latin music as a bandleader, composer, arranger and percussionist. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • cOlOMbIA “Molas” Tas Oszkay Febres Cordero When I was researching Colombia, I came across Molas. The Mola is a traditional textile art form made by the Kuna people of Panama and Colombia. Molas are cloth panels made to wear as clothing. They are used to decorate blouses of the Kuna women. Using several images of Molas, I created my own visions and figures along with images that I saw in traditional Molas. The result is my conglomeration of figures, colors and space. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • cOSTA RIcA “Earth Cycle” Anais Werkmeister I melded the natural landscape into the form of a Costa Rican dancer to depict the beauty of nature and the culture of the native people. Representing labor and trade, the dancer wears a yak wheel, the national labor symbol, as an earring and coffee beans for hair decoration. Her dress is the flow of growth within the jungles, seas and skies of Costa Rica accented by butterflies and orchids. By linking the mountain ranges and rivers of Panama and Nicaragua, I hope to show that all rivers lead to the same oceans and recycle into the same skies; all countries are forever influential toward each other. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • ecUAdOR “Marketplace” Jessica López While creating this painting of an Ecuadorian marketplace, I was looking to capture the beautiful and vibrant colors of their fruits, vegetables and the landscape. I painted from many different images of the Andes Mountains, fresh fruits and vegetables and marketplaces that appear throughout Ecuador. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • dOMINIcAN RePUblIc “The Color of Dance and Light” Concepts: Omar Hernandez Artist: Luis Macharé I chose to do the Dominican Republic for two reasons. The first thing that I wanted to portray in my painting was dancing, Merengue in particular. Merengue is a style of dancing created by the slaves when they marched in a single file line as they waited to be deported. They used hand and leg movements so the chains would make noise, which they would dance to. The second aspect of this country that I wanted to represent was the vibrant colors that are everywhere. From the sky ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. to the ocean, from the jungle to the beaches, from morning until night, there are so many beautiful colors that can be seen on this island. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • NIcARAGUA “Mi Abuelo” Concepts: Alex Kramer Artist: Luis Macharé I chose Nicaragua because I lived there for several years as a teenager. Although I was born in Colombia, Nicaragua feels like home to me. I always remember my grandfather working in the fields, and I wanted to create a painting to remember him since he just passed away this year. I hope I made him and his country proud. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • MexIcO “The Flower Seller in Cuernavaca” Luis Macharé Based on a photo taken in Cuernavaca, Mexico, I painted an elderly woman sitting on the steps that lead down to the tourist shops. Around her were baskets of flowers that she was selling. Cuernavaca is full of flowers and trees. A wonderful afternoon light filtered through the leaves, creating a magical time of day. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • ARGeNTINA “Tango” Concepts: Karina Robles Artist: Luis Machare When I started the design for Tango, I felt a little intimidated working with Luis and the other students. I was afraid I wouldn’t come up with a design that was a good representation of Argentina. After I thought about it for a while, I decided that the Tango would be an excellent representation of the country. The Tango is a very passionate dance and I hope everyone is able to see the passion in the eyes of these dancers. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • bRAzIl “El Corcovado Over the Shore” Concepts: Nicholas Rabago Artist: Luis Machare In my concept for the painting of Brazil, I wanted to bring out the beautiful sights that the country has to offer. I felt the best way to show the colors of the lush vegetation and the vibrant blues of the ocean was to paint a view looking down from the Corcovado (Christ the Redeemer statue) over the shore of Brazil. Luis inspired me as I worked on this concept. As a result of this project, I am even more encouraged to keep painting. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • chIle “Le Cueca” Luis Macharé A huaso, or cowboy, is dancing the national dance of Chile - La Cueca - with a spectacular sunset over the Andes in the background. Belonging to a large group of so-called “handkerchief dances” found throughout Latin America, the La Cueca dance is closely tied to the Chilean culture of the huaso. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • PUeRTO RIcO “Vejigante” Artist: Sadie Abler To capture the magical qualities of Puerto Rico, I chose to paint a traditional Vejigante mask which is typically worn in Ponce during the festivals that start in the middle of February and end on Ash Wednesday and the start of Lent. Even the houses are festive with facades painted in all the colors of the rainbow. In the background stands El Morro, a recognizable landmark in Puerto Rican history. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • MexIcO “The Aztec and The Lady” Artist: Angel Montoya I chose Mexico... and what a better way to represent Mexico than with two of the most important marks in history of Mexico. The mighty Aztecs became biggest empire of their time in the heart of Mexico (Mexico City). When the Spanish first saw the Aztecs they wrote in a diary of their journey, “We have never seen such a thing,” the Aztec Empire was enormous. Opposite the Aztec stands the Lady of Guadalupe, which Mexicans consider their mother. A long time ago she appeared in Mexico City and said she wanted her temple to be built there and that’s how it was. Today, millions of Mexicans look up to her and pray to her hoping for miracles. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • cUbA PlAce “TITLE” “Castro” Artist: Name Artist: Alain Lovaco Fidel has been the face of Cuba for so many years and that is why he is in the foreground. In addition, since Castro took over, there have not been any American cars imported, so I decided to add in an 1955-’56 Chevy. In the background I wanted to show Old Havana and what it looks like today as a result of the revolution that took place. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • SPAIN PlAce “TITLE” “Gaudi's Barcelona” Artist: Name Artist: Kevin Lawler My sister brought back photos from a trip to Barcelona, Spain. I was intrigued by the architecture of Antonio Gaudi, the Sagrada Familia and Park Guell, where he designed what could be described as a subdivision with houses, a church and public spaces. In the painting, I am trying to capture the unusual shapes, the arches and the mosaics that he used throughout the park. I am also contrasting these shapes with more modern, streamlined buildings in the background. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • NORTheRN PeRU PlAce “TITLE” “Moche Warrior” Artist: Name Artist: Philippe Macharé My painting incorporates both traditional and symbolic aspects. The man in my painting is a Moche warrior, from the north of Peru. The Moche were some of the greatest warriors in that region. They were also great clay artisans as well as metal workers. The colors I chose to use are those found their pottery and tomb paintings, earth tones, rich reds, terra cotta, yellows, the green of oxidized copper. The hand rising above the man’s head symbolizes the strength and warlike nature of the Mochica and in the hand is a knife like those used for sacrifices. The shield has a design inspired by an intricate gold crab necklace found in Moche tomb. The Moche traded for precious stones like turquoise and lapis which is found in their gold work. The land of Northern Peru is now desert, but the Moche used irrigation systems to create arable land that supported their civilization. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • MexIcO PlAce “TITLE” “Las Charras” Artist: Name Artist: Emily Melendez My picture is of a Mexican rodeo rider, called a Charra. She is pictured with her horse on the landscape of Aguascalientes, Mexico, where the San Marcos Fair is held every year. Charras are one of the favorite features of this festival. I chose to paint this picture because I love the traditional dress, the horse and the sweeping landscape. My Great Grandma originally came from Aguascalientes, so the painting was also a tribute to her. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • MexIcO PlAce “TITLE” “Guanajuato” Artist: Name Artist: John Sanchez I chose to paint Guanajuato, Mexico because both my grandmother and my grandfather on my dad’s side were actually born and raised there. My painting depicts the city of Guanajuato, located n the mountains of the Sierra de Guanajuato in Mexico. The name of the city, which means “place of frogs,” was given by the indigenous people who thought the location was only fit for frogs. The Spanish discovered rich veins of silver which they mined. sThe Spaniards built a colonial city with narrow curving streets, colorful houses, plazas and beautiful churches. At the top of my painting is El Cristo Rey, one of the largest statues of Jesus in the world. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • URUGUAY PlAce “TITLE” “Tango Mate” Artist: Name Artist: Rachel Terrill Uruguay: through this painting I have learned a lot about this fascinating South American country. The hands are holding up a Mate glass. This glass, usually filled with a green tea called yerba mate, symbolizes how the people act socially. Friends and family usually drink this together and relax. The hands are there to represent the native people as a whole. The scene inside the glass is that of a couple tangoing the night away in the city. Tango is a big part of the culture and is well known and so I integrated this dance into my picture. To contrast the nightscape of the city, I put the bright countryside in the background. The rolling hills are peaceful and calm, and bring serenity to the piece. All of these things highlight what is important in Uruguay, even today. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • PANAMA PlAce PlAce “TITLE” “TITLE” “Boats of Panama” Artist: Name Artist: Name Artist: Jessica Lopez Panama is a location rich in culture, history, and atmosphere. In parts of panama, many people do not share the same luxuries as other individuals living in larger economies. This painting suggests that this is a place where material items do not hold as much meaning as simply spending time with one another and enjoying all the beautiful things that Panama has to offer. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • SPAIN PlAce PlAce “TITLE” “Dance “TITLE” of the Matador” Artist: Name Artist: Name Artist: Natalie Ergas One of the most prominent traditions in Spanish culture is bullfighting, which started in Spain in around 1726. The relationship between the matador and the bull is intriguing. It is like a game of cat and mouse, where each always anticipates the next move of the other. That is what interested me the most and inspired me to paint bullfighting. The sport can also be compared to a dance of elegant postures which inspired the composition for this piece. Through the Cultural ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. Awareness program, I was able to grow as an artist ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. tremendously, as this was my first time working very large. This opportunity helped me further develop my artistic skill and also allows me to be able to pursue art in my future. I learned a lot about myself and about who I want to be as an artist through my experiences in the Program. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • elPlAce SAlVAdOR PlAce “TITLE” “Temple” “TITLE” Artist: Name Artist:Artist: Name III Natalio Lopez n my painting of El Salvador I wanted to portray the historical and current warriors of the country. Historically, before the arrival of the Spanish there were Indigenous tribes throughout the entire region of El Salvador. The temple that I chose to paint is just southwest of Ilobasco. Most scholars agree that this was of the Pipil tribe which was dominant in that particular region of El Salvador. Currently in El Salvador there is a new type of warrior that has emerged over the past decades. The Mara Salvatrucha has become to be known as some of the most violent organizations in recent times. Although they have been known to be extremely ©2009 La La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare Associates, Inc. violent and connected to organized crime, they are ©2009 Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & & Associates, Inc. still part of the current culture of El Salvador. I tried to create a contrast between the beauty of the country and its social troubles by painting a beautiful folkloric dancer with the ghost of the Salvatrucha in the background. We can’t ignore the social problems, but we can look at the beauty. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • bRAzIl PlAce PlAce “TITLE” “TITLE” “Reflection at Dawn” Artist: Name Artist: Name Artist: Samantha Thammahong My initial idea for this piece of art came after browsing many Peruvian pictures, through the influence of Diego Rivera, a Mexican muralist. Diego concerned himself with the portrayal of social issues through large murals. While not a typical mural, I wanted to use the images to convey the social connection between the ancient world of the Incan people and the modern world of Peruvians. Metaphorically, the piece symbolizes growth. From the left, you see the newborn child who will grow to be the mother and ultimately, ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. like her ancestors, return to the land, apropos the ruins. Finally, the clothes on the mother represent the vibrancy of both the culture and family unit in Peru. Overall, I hoped to capture a filial, vibrant underpinning with this piece. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • hONdURAS “Maya” Artist: Rachel Theide My painting is based on the beautiful country of Honduras. While researching, I came across many beautiful photographs of Honduras. The challenge was to incorporate as many elements as possible without cluttering the painting. I started with the basic structure of the building – definitely the most challenging part for me. It is a Mayan temple that can be found in Copán, where the largest site of Mayan ruins is located. On the ruins, I placed two statue faces: at the bottom, a fiery god embracing the sun; at the top, a face based on a Mayan sculpture. Next to the Mayan temple a stela rises from the grass. To represent the many species of birds that are found in Honduras rainforests, I placed a Macaw parrot in the sky. All in all, I believe I was very successful in creating a symbol of the country and representing Honduras and its people. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • belIze PlAce PlAce “TITLE” “TITLE” “TwoNameBelizes” Artist: Artist: Name Artist: Gibran Omar Hernandez Belize was difficult to capture because of the extremes. I wanted to capture poverty in the inner city of Belize to show that art isn’t always about pretty things. By depicting the ocean and the waterways I could show the movement and flow of nature and some of the beauty. My goal is to show the public that all around the world there is always an ugly side and a bad side to a country. Through this project I learned about Belize, how it was once part of the British Empire. I also improved my painting skills. My hope is that we humans will begin working together to ensure that beautiful places and tropic wonders survive and flourish. ©2009 La La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare Associates, Inc. ©2009 Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & & Associates, Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • TRINIdAd TObAGO PlAce “TITLE” “Celebration” Artist: Name Artist: Mary Davidson My painting shows a scene of the twin islands of Trinidad and Tobago during their annual children’s festival. Each year, people across the small nation proudly take part in the Trinidad and Tobago Carnival, which is celebrated two days before Ash Wednesday. In addition, the children of Trinidad and Tobago are also given their own festival to celebrate in unique and creative outfits. Carnival is a time the streets are filled with color and national pride. During the experience of creating this painting, I learned how to use oil paints for the first ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc. Inc. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, time. In my research, I learned a lot about Trinidad and Tobago, including its vast aquatic life and folklore. Also, I met a lot of people who shared my interest in art. It was nice to have the opportunity to explore the art world further, to expand and develop my skills, and to enlarge my group of friends. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.
  • PeRU PlAce PlAce “TITLE” “Peru“TITLE” of the Incas” Artist: Name Artist: Name Artist: Kevin Keadle My initial idea for this piece of art came after browsing many Peruvian pictures, through the influence of Diego Rivera, a Mexican muralist. Diego concerned himself with the portrayal of social issues through large murals. While not a typical mural, I wanted to use the images to convey the social connection between the ancient world of the Incan people and the modern world of Peruvians. Metaphorically, the piece symbolizes growth. From the left, you see the newborn child who will grow to be the mother and ultimately, ©2009 La La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare Associates, Inc. ©2009 Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & & Associates, Inc. like her ancestors, return to the land, apropos the ruins. Finally, the clothes on the mother represent the vibrancy of both the culture and family unit in Peru. Overall, I hoped to capture a filial, vibrant underpinning with this piece. ©2009 La Casa de Esperanza and ©2009 Machare & Associates, Inc.