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Proven Steps To Habit Formation
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Proven Steps To Habit Formation

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An exploration of proven steps toward habit formation. Based on BJ Fogg's BehaviorModel.org and BehaviorGrid.org

An exploration of proven steps toward habit formation. Based on BJ Fogg's BehaviorModel.org and BehaviorGrid.org

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Proven Steps To Habit Formation Proven Steps To Habit Formation Presentation Transcript

  • Proven Steps to Habit Formation Insights from sleep hygiene training for insomnia patients Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a common treatment component for patients suffering from insomnia. According to SleepEducation.com, "Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) helps you change actions or thoughts that hurt your ability to sleep well. It helps you develop habits that promote a healthy pattern of sleep." http://www.sleepeducation.com/Treatment.aspx?id=5
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • One form of CBT considers sleep hygiene, or the habits people form around the behavior of sleep.
    • Sleep hygiene includes many behaviors that can help patients get better sleep:
      • Don’t go to bed unless you are sleepy.
      • Begin rituals that help you relax each night before bed.
      • Get up at the same time every morning, even on weekends and holidays.
      • Don’t read, write, eat, watch TV, talk on the phone, or play cards in bed.
      • Do not have any caffeine after lunch.
      • Make your bedroom quiet, dark, and a little bit cool.
    • http://www.sleepeducation.com/Hygiene.aspx
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • One form of CBT considers sleep hygiene, or the habits people form around the behavior of sleep.
    • Sleep hygiene includes many behaviors that can help patients get better sleep:
      • Don’t go to bed unless you are sleepy.
      • Begin rituals that help you relax each night before bed.
      • Get up at the same time every morning, even on weekends and holidays.
      • Don’t read, write, eat, watch TV, talk on the phone, or play cards in bed.
      • Do not have any caffeine after lunch.
      • Make your bedroom quiet, dark, and a little bit cool.
      • http://www.sleepeducation.com/Hygiene.aspx
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • One form of CBT considers sleep hygiene, or the habits people form around the behavior of sleep.
    • Sleep hygiene includes many behaviors that can help patients get better sleep:
      • Don’t go to bed unless you are sleepy.
      • Begin rituals that help you relax each night before bed.
      • Get up at the same time every morning, even on weekends and holidays.
      • Don’t read, write, eat, watch TV, talk on the phone, or play cards in bed.
      • Do not have any caffeine after lunch.
      • Make your bedroom quiet, dark, and a little bit cool.
      • http://www.sleepeducation.com/Hygiene.aspx
    One aspect of getting up at the same time every morning is setting an alarm clock for the same time every night. How does this behavior become a habit as part of sleep hygiene training?
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • Step 1: Choose a daily wake up time during the first session with a sleep counselor. Green Dot
      • Trigger
        • Counselor prompts the decision-making.
      • Ability
        • Counselor is trained and can help in the process. Appointment time pre-allocated. Possibly the patient's daily schedule is on hand.
      • Motivation
        • Patient wants to sleep better.
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • Step 2: Set an alarm clock for the chosen time each night for the first week of CBT. Green Span
      • Trigger
        • Going to sleep.
      • Ability
        • Setting alarm clock is quick, patient has done it before.
      • Motivation
        • Patient wants to sleep better. Also wants to please the sleep counselor and not miss any morning commitments.
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • Step 3: Report back to the sleep counselor after the first week. Green Dot
      • Trigger
        • Sleep counselor solicits patient's feedback
      • Ability
        • Patient is already in the appointment, not a hard question if it's just about the events of one week. Maybe the counselor asks the patient to keep a log of what time they woke up to make it easier to remember.
      • Motivation
        • Social acceptance requires answering the question. Still want to get better sleep.
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • Step 4: Set an alarm clock for the chosen time each night for the remainder of CBT. Blue Span
      • Trigger
        • Going to sleep
      • Ability
        • Setting the alarm is still the quick, easy, and now routine part
      • Motivation
        • Patient still wants to sleep better.
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • Step 5: Report back to the sleep counselor each week for the remainder of CBT. Blue Span
      • Trigger
        • Sleep counselor solicits patient's feedback
      • Ability
        • Patient is already in the appointment, not a hard question if it's just about the events of one week. Maybe the counselor asks the patient to keep a log of what time they woke up to make it easier to remember.
      • Motivation
        • Social acceptance requires answering the question. Still want to get better sleep.
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010
    • Step 6: When CBT is over, set alarm clock for the same time each night from then on. Blue Path
      • Trigger
        • Going to bed.
      • Ability
        • By now, this is highly routine. Little thought is required, since the patient knows the time to set the alarm will always be the same.
      • Motivation
        • Now that the counselor is out of the picture, the motivation is focused on getting good sleep, and keeping morning appointments the next day.
  • Andrew Hershberger  |  habits.stanford.edu  |  13 May 2010 How proven are these steps? CBT as a whole has proven to be highly effective in helping insomnia patients, but it usually includes many different behaviors. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_behavioral_therapy The steps described here are only one example of how the set-alarm-clock behavior might be established as part of sleep hygiene training, but it is easy to see how counseling of many different kinds or even a coach more generally (perhaps a parent in the case of a school-aged child who is being taught good sleep habits) could help this behavior to form.