Behavioral interviewing presentation - st gabriel in transition (2)

  • 5,265 views
Uploaded on

 

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
5,265
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
120
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Behavioral Interviewing & Competency Development St. Gabriel in Transition Charlotte, NC Thursday, August 20th Kind invitation of: Bill Conwell Presenter: Mauro “MAC” Calcano www.getmyprofile.com/mcalcano www.facebook.com/MAC.Calcano
  • 2.
    • Definition: What is behavioral interviewing?
    • Behavioral interviewing is a style of interviewing that was developed in the 1970's by industrial psychologists. Behavioral interviewing asserts that the accurate predictor of future performance is past performance in a similar situation.
    • Renewed use of B.I. (behavioral interviewing) is due to employers wanting to achieve “right hire” in terms of cost to the company. It is estimated that ‘the wrong hire” cost approximate 4 times the annual salary of a prospective candidate ( i.e. recruiting , lost productivity, training and importantly effect on the organization).
    • Behavioral interviewing emphasizes past performance and behaviors. As a consequence, candidates unprepared for the rigor of behavioral interviewing have not fared well. In a traditional interview, you will be asked a series of questions which typically have straight forward answers like
    • Tell me about yourself. What are your strengths and weaknesses?
    • Why are you interested in working for us?
  • 3.
    • Behavioral interviewing
    • Companies that employ this technique have predetermined the skill sets (competencies) that are required for the position. Therefore behavioral based interviewing is interviewing based on discovering how the interviewee acted in specific employment-related situations. The logic is that how you behaved in the past (your skills) will predict how you will behave in the future i.e. past performance predicts future performance.
    • These skills could include: decision making and problem solving, leadership, motivation, communication, interpersonal skills, planning and organization, critical thinking skills, team building and the ability to influence others.
    • The company determines the skill sets by doing a detailed analysis of the position. As an example:
          • What are the necessary skills to do this job?
          • What does a successful candidate look like?
          • What would make an unsuccessful candidate in this company?
          • Why have people left this position previously?
          • What is the most difficult part of this job?
  • 4. Competency Development
    • Entrepreneurship
    • Strategic Thinking
    • Makes Money
    • Knows the Business
    • Leadership
    • People Skills
    • Corporate Values
    • Set Aggressive goals
      • Drives for results
      • demonstrates a strong commitment to organizational success
      • Works to do what is best for all stakeholders.
    • Financial Acumen
      • Understand the meaning and implications of key financial indicators
      • Manages overall financial performance
      • Leads sound financial processes tailored to maximize profitability
    • Driving Execution
      • Assigns clear authority and accountability
      • Manage change, while maintaining operating effectiveness
      • Integrates efforts across units and functions,
      • monitors results, tackles problems directly and with urgency
  • 5. The interview - Once you have landed the interview, keep in mind the following points. 1.) ALWAYS be detailed and specific. You should have developed three stories that illustrate your past performance for every question asked. Remember, it is about PERFORMACE in that the interviewer will be operating under the premise that "past performance in a similar setting is the best predictor of future performance." 2.) The best way to accomplish this is to use the three-step approach Explain the Situation or Task (Context) Action – what exactly did YOU do Result or outcome for the company (use figures, %, etc) The example - you might recount a time when communication within your work group had broken down (situation). To resolve the problem, you organized informal lunch meetings for people to discuss relevant issues (action). Morale then improved, as did the lines of communication (result).
  • 6. Preparation: Research the Company . 40% of recruiters cite “lack of company knowledge” as the most-common interview mistake. The pitfall is being unprepared and the behavior is that if you come to an interview unprepared, you will do the same on the job. Know yourself . Think about a time when you felt successful and the challenges you overcame. What were the behaviors? You can use this information to answer situational or behavioral questions. Your research should also help you determine company expectations, the environment (cultural fit) and the opportunities you are looking for – BE CAREFUL OF CANNED RESPONSES. Know what to ask . Develop a list of probing questions to ask the interviewer. The level of questions will reflect your own depth and what is important to you. You may want to ask what is the organization‘s strategic plan? What is the best reason to work there? What are the major challenges and priorities in the position? Why is the position open? What challenges does the company face? What characteristics would a successful person in this position have? How frequently is the position evaluated? When will a decision be made?
  • 7. Prepare answers to routine and common questions . Interviewers typically ask questions about your educational background, character traits, management ability, suitability for the job, salary history and requirements, experience and hobbies. Use your answers to these questions to enhance your abilities, skills and performance by emphasizing your work related experiences that match the employer’s needs and job fit. Rehearse your delivery. Practice interviewing with a friend or mentor. If possible, videotape your responses and review the result. Then, work to improve your performance. Rehearse before a mirror and check facial expressions, nervous gestures and body language. Smile confidently, hold your chin up, sit upright with your arms open and relaxed. Stick to your message . Choose major points (three good reasons why you are an outstanding candidate) that you want to communicate and stay on target. Be flexible to adapt to normal conversation. Jump in when appropriate and address the last speaker by name. Instead of “I guess I have a question,” use direct “who, what, when, where, why questions.” Use powerful succinct questions that demonstrate how you coach, analyze, solve, lead and listen. Always speak to the future. You didn’t leave a job because it offered little growth; rather, you’re moving on in search of new opportunities. Don’t blame others or criticize past supervisors or companies. Ask what happens next. Send a thank you note immediately after the interview.
  • 8. Behavioral Interviewing – In order to understand behavior, these are the types of probes you should prepare for. Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Leadership: 1.) Tell me about a time when you accomplished something significant that wouldn't have happened if you had not been there to make it happen. 2.) Tell me about a time when you were able to step into a situation, take charge, muster support and achieve good results. 3.) Describe for me a time when you may have been disappointed in your work. 4.) Tell me about a time when you had to discipline or fire a friend. 5.) Tell me about a time when you've had to develop leaders under you. Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Initiative and Follow-through: 1.) Give me an example of a situation where you had to overcome major obstacles to achieve your objectives. 2.) Tell me about a goal that you set that took a long time to achieve or that you are still working towards. 3.)Tell me about a time when you won (or lost) an important contract. 4.)Tell me about a time when you used your political savvy to push a program through that you really believed in. 5.) Tell me about a situation that you had significant impact on because of your follow-through.
  • 9.
    • If You're Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Work Quality:
    • ) Tell me about a time when you wrote a report that was well received. What do you attribute that to?
    • ) Tell me about a time when you wrote a report that was not well received. What do you attribute that to?
    • ) Tell me about a specific project or program that you were involved with that resulted in improvement in a major work area.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you set your sights too high (or too low).
    • If You're Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Creativity and Innovation:
    • ) Tell me about a situation in which you were able to find a new and better way of doing something significant.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you were creative in solving a problem.
    • ) Describe a time when you were able to come up with new ideas that were key to the success of some activity or project.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you had to bring out the creativity in others.
    • If You're Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Priority Setting:
    • ) Tell me about a time when you had to balance competing priorities and did so successfully.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you had to pick out the most important things in some activity and make sure those got done.
    • ) Tell me about a time that you prioritized the elements of a complicated project.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you got bogged down in the details of a project.
  • 10.
    • Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Thinking and Problem Solving:
    • ) Tell me about a time when you had to analyze facts quickly, define key issues, and respond immediately or develop a plan that produced good results.
    • ) If you had to do that activity over again, how would you do it differently?
    • ) Describe for me a situation where you may have missed an obvious solution to a problem.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you anticipated potential problems and developed preventative measures.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you surmounted a major obstacle.
    • Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Communication:
    • ) Tell me about a time when you had to present a proposal to a person in authority and were able to do this successfully.
    • ) Tell me about a situation where you had to be persuasive and sell your idea to someone else.
    • ) Describe for me a situation where you persuaded team members to do things your way. What was the effect?
    • ) Tell me about a time when you were tolerant of an opinion that was different from yours.
    • Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Working Effectively with Others:
    • ) Give me an example that would show that you've been able to develop and maintain productive relations with others, though there were differing points of view.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you were able to motivate others to get the desired results.
  • 11.
    • If You're Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Decision Making:
    • )Describe for me a time when you had to make an important decision with limited facts.
    • )Tell me about a time when you were forced to make an unpopular decision.
    • )Describe for me a time when you had to adapt to a difficult situation. What did you do?
    • )Tell me about a time when you made a bad decision
    • ) Tell me about a time when you hired (or fired) the wrong person.
    • If You're Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Ability to Work in Varying Work Conditions (stress, changing deadlines, etc.):
    • ) Tell me about a time when you worked effectively under pressure.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you were unable to complete a project on time.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you had to change work mid-stream because of changing organizational priorities.
    • ) Describe for me what you do to handle stressful situations.
    • If You're Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Delegation:
    • ) Tell me about a time when you delegated a project effectively.
    • ) Tell me about a time when you did a poor job of delegating.
    • ) Describe for me a time when you had to delegate to a person with a full workload, and how you went about doing it.
    • If You're Looking For Behaviors that Revolve Around Customer Service:
    • )Tell me about a time when you had to deal with an irate customer.
    • ) Tell me about one or two customer-service related programs that you've done that you're particularly proud of.
    • )Tell me about a time when you made a lasting, positive impression on a customer