secterian violence and banned militant organizations in pakistan

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this is what i think will be a brief introduction of those who want to know about the secterian violence and militant groups .. i think this is benificial for the students fo IR sociology as will

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secterian violence and banned militant organizations in pakistan

  1. 1. Scheme of presentation  Introduction  Increase in sectarian violence  Groups involved in sectarian violence  Anti Indian militant groups inside Pakistan  Recommendations for putting an end to sectarian violence  The list of banned military organization in Pakistan
  2. 2. Sectarian violence is among the critical threats to Pakistan’s internal security and stability. Besides sectarian-related attacks and targeted killings by violent sectarian groups, sectarian Discrimination is also increasingly penetrating individuals’ attitudes and behaviours in Pakistan.
  3. 3. Sectarian: Groups involved in the violence , or motivated groups such as the Sunni Organization, Sipah-e-Sahaba, LashkareJhangvi and the Shia Tehrik-e-Jafria that are engaged in violence within Pakistan
  4. 4. Increase in Sectarian Violence Despite the government’s repeated bans on sectarian groups, they are becoming more active and defiant across country, particularly in Karachi, Quetta and South Punjab.
  5. 5. According to Pak Institute for Peace Studies’ (PIPS) Pakistan Security Report 2012 the overall Incidents of Sectarian Violence, including sectarian-related terrorist attacks and clashes, increased significantly, by about 53 percent, in 2012
  6. 6. Many of the banned Sectarian Organizations wear Political hats and take part in electoral Politics, whether with different names and independent candidates or through making alliances with mainstream Political Parties PIPS
  7. 7. Groups involved in Sectarian Violence  The Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (Punjab) Area of operations: Countrywide Targets: Shea Muslims, non-Muslims, foreign nationals, state security forces Base of support: Sectarian groups in Punjab. It first emerged in the Punjab in the 1990s.
  8. 8. Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan Area of operations: Traditionally, the Mehsud group of the TTP, which operates from bases in the tribal territory of South Waziristan; operating mainly from Orakzai Agency. Other Taliban factions are based in the Khyber Agency and, according to media reports, in southern Punjab. Targets: Pakistani military personnel and civilians - typically suicide bombings in markets. Support base: The Mehsud tribe and other tribes loyal to it assisted by foreign militants.
  9. 9. Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (North) Area of operations: All tribal territories, but especially Kurram and Orakzai where there is a Shea population - a minority Muslim sect. Targets: Pakistani civilians, especially Shies, and military personnel. Attacks on Western nationals in Pakistan. Base of support: Mainly anti-Shea militant groups from Punjab.
  10. 10. Sipah-e-Sahaba Pakistan Area if operations: Countrywide with a concentration in the Punjab Targets: Non-Muslims and the Shea minority Base of support: Other sectarian groups and hardline Muslim factions.
  11. 11. Tehrik-e-Jafaria, Pakistan  It was formerly known as Tehrik-e Nefaz-e Fiqh-e Jafria  It is shia organization against Sunnis  Tehrik-e-Jafaria Pakistan (TJP) was banned again on 5 November 2011  whereas it was banned two times before by President Pervez Musharraf's government. Increased attacks on Shias since 2005 from the Pakistan Taliban, Sipah-eSahaba, Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, Jundullah and Jaish-eMohammed
  12. 12. Jaish-e-Mohammad Area of operations: Mainly Indian-held Kashmir and Afghanistan; some role in fighting in north. Headquartered in the southern Punjab Targets: Indian forces, Western nationals, non-Muslim Pakistanis Base of support: Backing from hard-line Muslim factions involved in violence in northwest Pakistan and across the border in Afghanistan.
  13. 13. Lashkar-e-Islam Area of operations: Khyber Agency Targets: Pakistani civilians Base of support: The hard-line Deobandi Muslim sect; locked in a battle against militant rivals for control in Khyber.
  14. 14. Tehrik-i-Nifaz-i-Shariat-iMohammadi Area of operations: Swat Valley, in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province; attempts to assert influence in Dir. Targets: Pakistani civilians - especially government figures, including teachers - and military personnel. Social roots and base of support: The group was set up in 1992. Its involvement in more widespread militancy began after 2002, when key leaders were imprisoned after participating in `jihad’ in Afghanistan. It has split into various factions since then.
  15. 15.  Anti-Indian: Groups focused on the kashmir dispute it is said that operate with the alleged support of the Pakistani military and the intelligence agency inter service intelligence (ISI), such as Lashkar-e-Taiba, Jaish-e-Muhammad, and Harakat ul-Mujahadeen  http://www.cfr.org/
  16. 16. Lashkar-e-Taiba Formed in 1990 the Lashkar-e-Toiba (also known as Jama’at-udDa’awa) is based in Muridke near Lahore in Pakistan and is headed by Hafiz Muhammad Saeed.  Its first presence in Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) was recorded in 1993 when 12 lashkar militants infiltrated across the Line of Control (LoC) in tandem with the Islami Inquilabi Mahaz, a terrorist outfit then active in the Poonch district of J&K.
  17. 17. Jaish-e-Mohammad  Area of operations: Mainly Indian-held Kashmir and Afghanistan; some role in fighting in north. Headquartered in the southern Punjab Targets: Indian forces, Western nationals, non-Muslim Pakistanis Base of support: Backing from hard-line Muslim factions involved in violence in northwest Pakistan and across the border in Afghanistan.
  18. 18. Harkat-ul-Mujahideen Alalami(HuMA)  Formation  The Harkat-ul-Mujahideen Al-alami (HuMA; Al-alami, meaning International) is an offshoot of the proscribed Deobandi terrorist group,  (and was formed sometime in the year 2002 after parting ways with the latter on a dispute over organizational affairs. According to The Friday  It is suspected to be involved in the failed attempts to assassinate President Pervez Musharraf and the former Interior Minister Moinuddin Haider.
  19. 19. Afghan Taliban  Afghan Taliban: The original Talibab movement and especially its Kandahari leadership centered around Mullah Mohammad Omar, believed to be based in Quetta  Mullah Muhammad Umar is never seen on media ,, and this is a question mark on the taliban leadership
  20. 20.  The Taliban emerged in the early 1990s in northern Pakistan following the withdrawal of Soviet troops from Afghanistan.  A predominantly Pashtun movement of it's time, the Taliban came to prominence in Afghanistan in the autumn of 1994.
  21. 21.  The Taliban's promise - in Pashtun areas straddling Pakistan and Afghanistan - was to restore peace and security and enforce their own austere version of Sharia, or Islamic law, once in power.  In both countries they introduced or supported Islamic punishments - such as public executions of convicted murderers and adulterers and amputations of those found guilty of theft.  Men were required to grow beards and women had to wear the all-covering burka.
  22. 22.  Pakistan was also one of only three countries, along with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), which recognised the Taliban when they were in power in Afghanistan from the mid-1990s until 2001.  Pakistan was also the last country to break diplomatic ties with the Taliban.
  23. 23.  Pakistan has repeatedly denied that it is the architect of the Taliban enterprise.  But there is little doubt that many Afghans who initially joined the movement were educated in madrassas (religious schools) in Pakistan.
  24. 24. Recommendations for putting an end point to Sectarian Violence  Interaction and dialogue among religious scholars and madrassa students and teachers belonging to all religious schools of thought  There should be zero tolerance for violent sectarian groups and their leaders  Government should strive in consultation with representatives of all madrassa boards
  25. 25.  The madrassa curriculum should emphasize religious Education and not Sectarian Education.  - Government should partner with representatives of all Wafaqs, or Madrassa education boards,  Opportunity to madrassas students to study viewpoints of different religious schools of thoughts.
  26. 26. The list of banned military organization in Pakistan                   Organisations 1. Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (Leek) 2. Sepah-e-Muhammad Pakistan (SMP) 3. Jaish-e-Muhammad (JeM) 4. Lakhar-e-Taeba (LeT) 5. Sepah-e-Sahaba Pakistan (SSP) 6. Tehreek-e-Jaafria Pakistan (TJP) 7. Tehreek-e-Nifaz-e-Shariat-e-Mohammad (TNSM) 8. Tehreek-e-Islami 9. AI Qaeda 10. Millat-e-Islamia Pakistan (Ex-SSP) 11. Khuddam-ul-Islam (Ex JeM) 12. Islami Tehreek Pakistan (Ex-TJP) 13. Jamiat-ul-Ansar 14. Jamiat-ul-Furqan 15. Hizbut Tehrir 16. Khair-un-Nas International Trust 17. Balochistan Liberation Armv (BLA) Proscription Date August 14, 2001 August 14, 2001 January 14, 2002 January 14, 2002 January 14, 2002 January 14, 2002 January 14, 2002 January 14, 2002 March 17, 2003 November 15, 2003 November 15, 2003 November 15, 2003 November 20, 2003 November 20, 2003 November 20, 2003 October 27, 2004 April 7, 2006
  27. 27.                  18. Islamic Students Movement of Pakistan 19. Lashkar-e-Islam 20. Ansar-ul-Islam 21. Haji Namdar Group 22. Tehreek-e- Taliban Pakistan (TTP) 23. Balochistan Republican Army (BRA) 24. Balochistan Liberation Front (BLF) 25. Laskhar-e-Balochistan (LeB) 26. Balochistan Liberation United Front (BLUF) 27. Balochistan Muslla Defa Tanzeem (BMDT) 28. Shia Tulaba Action Committee, Gilgit 29. Markaz sabeel Organisation, Gilgit 30. Tanzeem Naujawana-e-Ahle Sunnat (TNA), Gilgit 31. Peoples Aman Committee (Lyari), Karachi 32. Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat (ASWJ) Ex-banned organisation (SSP) 33. AI Harmain Foundation 34. Rabita Trust August 21, 2006 June 30, 2008 June 30, 2008 June 30, 2008 August 25, 2008 September 8, 2010 September 8, 2010 September 8, 2010 September 8, 2010 September 8, 2010 October 10, 2011 October 10, 2011 October 10, 2011 October 10, 2011 February 15, 2012 March 6, 2012 March 6, 2012
  28. 28.                     . 35. Anjuman-e- Imamia Gilgit Baltistan 36. Muslim Students Organisation(MSO) Gigit Baltistan 37. Balochistan Bunyad Parast Army 38. Tehreek Nafaz-e- Aman 39. Tahafuz Hadudullah 40. Balochisan Waja Liberation Army 41. Baloch Republican Party Azad 42. Balochistan United Army 43. Islam Mujahidin 44. Jaish-e- Islam 45. Balochistan National Liberation Army Enlisted under UNSCR 1267 46. AI-Akhtar Trust 47. AI-Rashid Trust 48. Jamaat-ud-Dawa (JuD) Under watch list / observation By WEB DESK Published: October 24, 2012 April 24, 2012 April 24, 2012 August 4, 2012 August 4, 2012 August 4, 2012 August 4, 2012 August 4, 2012 August 4, 2012 August 4, 2012 August 4, 2012 August 4, 2012 December 1, 2005 December 1, 2005 December 1, 2005
  29. 29. Conclusion

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