Introduction to Connectivism

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Connectivism has been developed by George Siemens and Stephen Downes based on their analysis of the limitations of traditional learning theories to explain the effect technology has had on how we live, how we communicate, and how we learn.

Published in: Education, Technology

Introduction to Connectivism

  1. 1. Introduction to Connectivism Presentation by Michael Wilder
  2. 2. Contents • Overview • Video Presentation • Teaching & Learning Strategies • Internet Hotlist • Internet Treasure Hunt • Additional Resources • References
  3. 3. Overview Connectivism has been developed by George Siemens and Stephen Downes based on their analysis of the limitations of traditional learning theories to explain the effect technology has had on how we live, how we communicate, and how we learn. From Wikipedia
  4. 4. Overview According to co-developer Stephen Downes (2007), connectivism posits that “knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to construct and traverse those networks. From What Connectivism Is
  5. 5. Overview In connectivism, there is no real concept of transferring knowledge, making knowledge, or building knowledge. Rather, the activities we undertake when we conduct practices in order to learn are more like growing or developing ourselves and our society in certain (connected) ways.
  6. 6. Overview • Learning is a process of connecting specialized nodes or information sources. • Capacity to know is more crucial than what is currently known. • Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning. • Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill. From Stephen Downes
  7. 7. Video Presentation George Siemens, University of Manitoba http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5-Wk2cwb68
  8. 8. Teaching & Learning Strategies Often associated with online learning, connectivist approaches to pedagogy often emphasize modeling and demonstration as a teaching strategy and practice and reflection as a learning technique. Although not necessarily a connectivist strategy, some course content has involved threaded discussion, blog posts, and synchronous meetings. Image by Alec Couros
  9. 9. Internet Hotlist http://www.kn.att.com/wired/fil/pages/listconnectimi1.html
  10. 10. Internet Treasure Hunt http://www.kn.att.com/wired/fil/pages/huntconnectimi.html
  11. 11. Additional Resources • An Introduction to Connective Knowledge Article by Stephen Downes providing an overview of connective knowledge. • Connectivism and Connective Knowledge Online Course 2009 support wiki A twelve-week course that will explored the concepts of connectivism and connective knowledge and explored their application as a framework for theories of teaching and learning. • Connectivism: Learning conceptualized through the lens of today’s world Slideshare presentation by George Siemens
  12. 12. References Connectivism (learning theory). (2010, May 29). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved July 10, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connectivism_%28learning_theory%29 Downes, S. (2007). What Connectivism Is. Connectivism Conference forum. Retrieved June 13, 2010, from http://halfanhour.blogspot.com/2007/02/what-connectivism-is.html Siemens, G. (2005). Connectivism: Learning as Network-Creation. ASTD learningCircuits. Retrieved June 12, 2010, from http://www.astd.org/LC/2005/1105_seimens.htm Siemens, G. (2009). What is Connectivism? Connectivism and Connective Knowledge Online Course 2009 support wiki. Retrieved June 13, 2010, from http://docs.google.com/Doc?id=anw8wkk6fjc_14gpbqc2dt
  13. 13. Credits/Contacts This presentation made by: Michael Wilder Learning Technologies Specialist E-mail|Web Site

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