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Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
Designing games for change for wicked problems
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Designing games for change for wicked problems

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Spring CTU Doctoral Symposium Workshop and EM Workshop Activities held on April 17-18, 2014 by Dr. Cynthia Calongne.

Spring CTU Doctoral Symposium Workshop and EM Workshop Activities held on April 17-18, 2014 by Dr. Cynthia Calongne.

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  • You draw an interesting correlation between 'Wicked Problems' and forces ( *al ). It certainly makes sense that games for change would be centered on one or more aspects of these forces. Thank you for sharing this!
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  • 1. Wicked Problems and Designing Games for Change Dr. Cynthia Calongne CTU Doctoral Symposium, April 17-19, 2014
  • 2. Wicked Problems • Hard to characterize • No simple solution • Ambiguous or complex • Diverse perspectives • Changing conditions • Global impact
  • 3. Wicked Problem Examples • Public Planning and Policy – Global climate change – Human trafficking – Drug trafficking – Natural hazards – Social injustice – Healthcare – Pandemics – Nuclear
  • 4. Addressing Wicked Problems • Novel solutions for unique problems – Normal tactics will fail – Exploration by trial and error – Solution defines the problem • Potential steps lead to consequences • Solutions are neither right or wrong • A symptom of another problem • Reciprocal cause and effect
  • 5. Types of Wicked Problems • Environmental • Economic • Spiritual • Political • Medical • Social • Moral
  • 6. How Can Emerging Media Help? Global Communication Global Argument Social Media Presencing Diversity Games
  • 7. MIT’s Action Research Global Wellbeing and Gross National Happiness Lab Presencing and Emerging Media
  • 8. Virtual- Physioception Motivation Intersubjective Presencing Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs) Transdisciplinarity Body awareness (Mehling, Gopisetty, Daubenmier, Price, Hecht & Stewart) Virtual Self (Fox & Bailenson; Ratan; McCreery) Social Presence (Biocca et al.; Blascovich) Player Identification (Van Looy) Supermorphic Persona (Young) Metacognition Theory (Flavell) Being (Maslow) Grit (Duckworth) Generativity (McAdams ) Intrinsic (Dickey) Intrinsic v. Extrinsic (Finkelstien) Volunteerism (Shye) Avatar appearance (Baylor) Presencing- (Senge et. Al; Scharmer) Transformed Social Interaction (Bailenson, Beall, Loomis, Blascovich &Turk; Bailenson) Presence in VWs – (Allmendinger, Suter) Dialogue (Bohm) Transformed Social Interaction in CVEs- (Bailenson) CVEs- (Montoya) WoW- (Yee) 3D Visualization (Siau, Nah, Mennecke & Schiller; Sonnewald) Manifesto (Nicolescu, Montuori) Team Science (Stokols) Team cognition (Salas & Fiore) Complexity Theory (Morin) Wicked Problems- (Rittel; Conklin) Courtesy of Dr. Barbara Truman, research in presencing and transdisciplinarity
  • 9. Presencing Sharing the Social Space within the Mind Space thru Games & Simulations Everyone Matters
  • 10. Benefits of Games Games can stimulate • Problem solving • Critical thinking • Digital literacy • Strategy & tactics • Motor skill development • Collaboration • Leadership & courage • Socialization Game-based learning • Vision & creativity • Sustainability • Immersion • Learning retention • Heutagogy • Knowledge networks • Socio-technical skills • Entrepreneurship
  • 11. Game Design and Prototyping Roleplay, Social Games and Simulations
  • 12. Leveraging a Game-Based Culture • Alternate reality games • Augmented reality • Games for change • Serious games • Gamification • Social games • MMORPGs • MMOGs
  • 13. Design Games for Change • Define the problem and desired outcomes • Identify the possible genres and tactics • Explore the story and game mechanics • Identify the EM tools, technology and resources • Design the quests • Integrate the story, quests and game mechanics • Play the game • Evaluate the desired outcomes and aesthetics
  • 14. Design Goals, Game Elements and Outcomes
  • 15. By Jane McGonigal http://janemcgonigal.com/learn-me/
  • 16. Game Genres and Play Styles Types of games • Word, trivia or puzzle • Scavenger or Treasure Hunt • Action or adventure • Real Time Strategy (RTS) • Roleplay game (RPG) • MMORPGs • Arcade or Video games • First Person Shooter (FPS) • Simulations (Sims) • Board or card games • Mobile and social games Play styles • Individual or social • Multiplayer cooperative • Multiplayer competitive • Everyone is a winner! • Last man standing – PvP • Player vs Environment • Roleplay • Capture the flag • Team wins • High score • Social and free play games
  • 17. Designing the Game Components
  • 18. Design Concepts Game Mechanics • Rules • Objectives • Environment • Setting • Win Conditions • Challenges • Treasure, Loot or Gold • Badges • Reputation Roleplay Games • Story • Terrain • 2D or 3D Graphics • Strategies • Conflict • Players • Non-Player Character (NPC) • Enemies or Monsters • Competition
  • 19. Game Controls and Observation
  • 20. Game Scoreboard
  • 21. A Few Design Distinctions Strategy Game • Game engine • Modeling – 2D diagrams and 3D objects • Character Creation • Level & Strategy Design • System Integration • Game Events • Win Strategy - Objectives • Quality Assurance – Unit & Integration Tests – Play and Usability Tests Virtual World Game • Virtual World Simulator • Rapid Prototyping – 3D Game Objects • Bots (NPCs) and Avatars • Linking Object Models – Designing Holodecks • Multimedia & Animations • Rubrics - Objectives & Outcomes • QA - Change Management – Object Behavior Tests – Integration, Play & Usability Tests
  • 22. Requirements for the Environment & Aesthetics
  • 23. Activity • In groups of 3-5 –Identify a problem –Identify a game genre for investigating it »Explore the problem »Explore possible solutions • Discuss the forces at work –The mnemonic = the words that end in –al
  • 24. Prototyping the Game’s Design
  • 25. A Game Designer Demos Her Game Badge
  • 26. Emerging Media Tactics • Global conversation – Social networks • Social media • Semantic Web • Mobile technology • Cloud computing • Game-based culture
  • 27. Designing Collectible Card Games
  • 28. Crowdsourcing the problem Trial and error Willingness to fail
  • 29. Game Activity • Using games for change –Identify the EM strategies for your game –Review its features and behavior »How it uses the Web »How it leverages socialization & collaboration »How it supports individual play • Describe the game mechanics –How do the players “win” at the game?
  • 30. Mayan Temple Game Simulation
  • 31. Non-Player Characters (NPCs)
  • 32. Players and NPCs Story, characterization and aesthetics Development of quality models and game prototypes
  • 33. Collaboration, Communication and Transdisciplinarity Scene from a CTU Emerging Media Sick Bay
  • 34. Immersive and Mobile Games Courtesy of Dr. Andrew Stricker
  • 35. Designing a Game Inside a Game Photo by C. Calongne Game Design by AgileBill Firehawk
  • 36. Wicked Problems and Designing Games for Change Dr. Cynthia Calongne CTU Doctoral Symposium, April 17-19, 2014 Game Activities

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