Chapter 10

337 views
284 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
337
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Use the reference interview to determine the resources needed to do the research. What is the subject area? How much information is needed and how in-depth? Is current or historical information needed? Are scholarly or popular resources required? From the information you garner during the reference interview, determine if initially you want to consult databases or the Web. Remember, you can always change your mind.
  • The following guidelines can help you determine if a Database is the appropriate choice. In general, database information has been vetted and the database vendors take responsibility for the quality of the material they are providing, therefore you can be confident that the material is credible. When articles or specific journals are requested databases are the reasonable choice because of the efficient searches they provide, their access to full text articles and the ease of tracking down citations. If your patron has book questions, WorldCat and Books in Print databases are invaluable resources, both can be used to find books on a topic, identify a title and verify a citation. If instead your patron is in need of a textbook, Amazon.com can be of help. Business questions, due to the nature of the question…which is probably worth money, will most likely require a database for a credible answer. Two popular business databases are Million Dollar database and Business and Company Resource Center. Law questions should be addressed using commercial legal databases because they provide the authority needed for this subject. Medical databases such as MEDLINE and PubMed are practical starting points for medical questions.
  • The following guidelines can help you determine if a Database is the appropriate choice. In general, database information has been vetted and the database vendors take responsibility for the quality of the material they are providing, therefore you can be confident that the material is credible. When articles or specific journals are requested databases are the reasonable choice because of the efficient searches they provide, their access to full text articles and the ease of tracking down citations. If your patron has book questions, WorldCat and Books in Print databases are invaluable resources, both can be used to find books on a topic, identify a title and verify a citation. If instead your patron is in need of a textbook, Amazon.com can be of help. Business questions, due to the nature of the question…which is probably worth money, will most likely require a database for a credible answer. Two popular business databases are Million Dollar database and Business and Company Resource Center. Law questions should be addressed using commercial legal databases because they provide the authority needed for this subject. Medical databases such as MEDLINE and PubMed are practical starting points for medical questions.
  • The following guidelines can help you determine if a Database is the appropriate choice. In general, database information has been vetted and the database vendors take responsibility for the quality of the material they are providing, therefore you can be confident that the material is credible. When articles or specific journals are requested databases are the reasonable choice because of the efficient searches they provide, their access to full text articles and the ease of tracking down citations. If your patron has book questions, WorldCat and Books in Print databases are invaluable resources, both can be used to find books on a topic, identify a title and verify a citation. If instead your patron is in need of a textbook, Amazon.com can be of help. Business questions, due to the nature of the question…which is probably worth money, will most likely require a database for a credible answer. Two popular business databases are Million Dollar database and Business and Company Resource Center. Law questions should be addressed using commercial legal databases because they provide the authority needed for this subject. Medical databases such as MEDLINE and PubMed are practical starting points for medical questions.
  • The following guidelines can help you determine if a Database is the appropriate choice. In general, database information has been vetted and the database vendors take responsibility for the quality of the material they are providing, therefore you can be confident that the material is credible. When articles or specific journals are requested databases are the reasonable choice because of the efficient searches they provide, their access to full text articles and the ease of tracking down citations. If your patron has book questions, WorldCat and Books in Print databases are invaluable resources, both can be used to find books on a topic, identify a title and verify a citation. If instead your patron is in need of a textbook, Amazon.com can be of help. Business questions, due to the nature of the question…which is probably worth money, will most likely require a database for a credible answer. Two popular business databases are Million Dollar database and Business and Company Resource Center. Law questions should be addressed using commercial legal databases because they provide the authority needed for this subject. Medical databases such as MEDLINE and PubMed are practical starting points for medical questions.
  • The following guidelines can help you determine if a Database is the appropriate choice. In general, database information has been vetted and the database vendors take responsibility for the quality of the material they are providing, therefore you can be confident that the material is credible. When articles or specific journals are requested databases are the reasonable choice because of the efficient searches they provide, their access to full text articles and the ease of tracking down citations. If your patron has book questions, WorldCat and Books in Print databases are invaluable resources, both can be used to find books on a topic, identify a title and verify a citation. If instead your patron is in need of a textbook, Amazon.com can be of help. Business questions, due to the nature of the question…which is probably worth money, will most likely require a database for a credible answer. Two popular business databases are Million Dollar database and Business and Company Resource Center. Law questions should be addressed using commercial legal databases because they provide the authority needed for this subject. Medical databases such as MEDLINE and PubMed are practical starting points for medical questions.
  • Chapter 10

    1. 1. Librarian’s Guide to Online Searching, Chapter 10<br />Choosing the Right Resource for the Question<br />LIS 7160<br />Lynn Roell<br />Annette Similuk<br />
    2. 2. <ul><li>Should you always try to use a database first? Not at all.
    3. 3. Is it “wrong” to use the Web? No.
    4. 4. Where do I start?</li></ul>Choosing the Right Resource for the Question:<br />
    5. 5. <ul><li>Subject area ?
    6. 6. What is the person looking for ?
    7. 7. Current of historical information ?
    8. 8. How much material is needed ?
    9. 9. Research level material or popular material ?</li></ul> Start with a good reference interview.<br />
    10. 10. <ul><li>Authority and credibility.
    11. 11. Databases are generally vetted
    12. 12. Vendor takes responsibility for content
    13. 13. Requests involving Articles, Citations.
    14. 14. Book questions
    15. 15. World Cat and Books in Print
    16. 16. Amazon.com good source for textbooks</li></ul>Questions for Databases:<br />
    17. 17. <ul><li>Business Questions
    18. 18. Million Dollar database
    19. 19. Business and Company Resource Center
    20. 20. Use the web for stock quotes and financial reports
    21. 21. Legal questions
    22. 22. LexisNexis
    23. 23. Medical Questions
    24. 24. MEDLINE
    25. 25. PubMed</li></ul>Questions for Databases:<br />
    26. 26. Recap<br /><ul><li>Use a Database when:</li></ul>Authority and credibility are required<br />There is a need for articles or journals<br />The research topic is business, law or medicine<br />
    27. 27. Choosing a Database<br /><ul><li>Subjects
    28. 28. Subject specific database
    29. 29. Multi-subject database:ProQuest's Research Library, EBSCO's Academic Search or MasterFILE.
    30. 30. Type of Material Needed
    31. 31. Journals, books, articles, videos
    32. 32. Level of Material
    33. 33. Popular
    34. 34. Scholarly</li></li></ul><li>Choosing a Database<br /><ul><li>Date Coverage
    35. 35. Current material
    36. 36. Historical material
    37. 37. Links to full text articles
    38. 38. Search-ability
    39. 39. Controlled vocabulary
    40. 40. Key word searching
    41. 41. Limiters</li></li></ul><li>Choosing a Database<br /><ul><li>Limited Databases
    42. 42. Special Libraries that cater to specific clientele
    43. 43. Free Databases
    44. 44. PubMed
    45. 45. ERIC
    46. 46. OCLC WorldCat
    47. 47. Google Scholar</li></li></ul><li>Questions for the Web:<br /><ul><li>Personal research
    48. 48. Popular culture, local information, and people.
    49. 49. Citation disambiguation.
    50. 50. Rare or obscure topics.
    51. 51. Medical questions for laypeople.
    52. 52. Standard facts and statistics.</li></li></ul><li>Questions for the Web:Personal Research<br /><ul><li>Examples:
    53. 53. Checking on flight arrival and departure times.
    54. 54. Getting weather reports.
    55. 55. Checking crossing delay times for bridges to Canada.
    56. 56. Checking movie times.
    57. 57. Buying anything online.
    58. 58. Finding an answer to your software or hardware question.</li></li></ul><li> Questions for the Web Popular Culture<br /><ul><li>Examples:
    59. 59. Who won the Golden Globe for Best Actress in 2011? For film questions, go to Internet Movie Database (IMDb).
    60. 60. Who is the highest paid player in the NFL?</li></li></ul><li>Questions for the WebLocal information, People<br /><ul><li>Where is the closest branch of the bank that I use?
    61. 61. Locations of Thai Restaurants in the area
    62. 62. Search for people you have lost touch with on the Web. </li></li></ul><li> Questions for the Web Citation Disambiguation <br />Use search engine such as google.<br />Find the citation on someone elses’s Web page that is correct and/or complete.<br />Find the author’s Web page.<br />
    63. 63. Questions for the Web Rare or obscure topics<br /><ul><li>Context.
    64. 64. Additional keywords for searching.</li></li></ul><li> Questions for the Web Medical questions for Laypeople<br /><ul><li>Recognize that medical information can be “incorrect, misleading, and outright dangerous, unless it comes from a reputable source.”
    65. 65. Direct patrons to reputable sites such as MedlinePlus.gov or WebMD.com.
    66. 66. It’s better to use databases such as Health Reference Center or the Virtual Reference Library, both from Gale.</li></li></ul><li>Questions for the Web Standard facts and statistics <br /><ul><li>Verify that it is a credible source.
    67. 67. Wikipedia just might be right!
    68. 68. Government statistics.</li></li></ul><li>Recap<br />Questions for the Web:<br />Daily life.<br />Popular culture.<br />People.<br />Connecting with other people’s knowledge, known as the “informal college,” for software questions, obscure topics, and “fragment questions,” or questions about lyrics, quotations, etc.<br />
    69. 69. Sorting through online systems by Carol Tenopir<br />There are “many choices of systems” and “much complexity in the library’s online environment.”<br />
    70. 70. What’s a librarian to do?<br /><ul><li>Recognize the similarities.
    71. 71. Focus on a few important differences.</li></li></ul><li>Similarities in interfaces:<br /><ul><li>The Web and Web browsers dominate.
    72. 72. Use the back button if you get lost.
    73. 73. Look for
    74. 74. a system with a simple interface as the default. (Use more advanced features once you get to know the system.)</li></li></ul><li>Similarities in Search Features:<br /><ul><li>Standards
    75. 75. Boolean logic
    76. 76. Set building
    77. 77. Proximity operators
    78. 78. Truncation
    79. 79. Record/field structure.
    80. 80. “You don’t need to memorize all the ways systems can implement AND and OR, just know how to find them.”</li></li></ul><li>Good Advice:<br /> “Don’t be ashamed to check help screens, because if you don’t search a specific system very often, you’ll soon forget its syntax for proximity operators (and standardization isn’t likely to happen anytime soon.”<br />
    81. 81. Database structure is standard<br />“a collection of records, each made up of fields each field of which comprises words and/or phrases.”<br />Core fields:<br />Author<br />Title<br />Journal name<br />Corporate source<br />Date fields<br />
    82. 82. Be aware of Differences<br />Output: Relevancy ranking<br />Content: Full text <br /> Scholarly articles<br />
    83. 83. “There are many choices and much complexity in the library’s online environment, but if you recognize the similarities when possible, you can put more effort into being mindful of the most important differences.”<br />Tenopir, Carol. “Sorting Through Online Systems.” Library Journal (May 1, 2002): 32,34.<br />

    ×