Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
© COPYRIGHT AND YOU!<br />
WHAT IS COPYRIGHT?<br />Laws created to protect authors and artists who create “original” works<br />Original works can on...
COPYRIGHT IN AUSTRALIA<br />Australian copyright law is contained in a piece of federal legislation called: <br />The Copy...
WHAT IS NOT PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT?<br />Works that have not been written or recorded (your stories, if they are not writt...
HOWEVER…<br />Students are exempted from some of this through the use of ”FAIR DEALING”for educational purposes<br />
WHAT IS FAIR DEALING?<br />“Fair Dealing” exceptions allow students to use copyright works for their studies, within limit...
FAIR DEALING GUIDELINES<br />Sometimes, it is hard to know how much of a copyrighted work you can use.<br />The following ...
FAIR DEALING GUIDELINES<br />Use the smallest amount of: <br />
FAIR DEALING AND THE INTERNET<br />If a work is published in electronic form, a reasonable portion is not more than 10% of...
PUBLIC DOMAIN WORKS<br />Some works are considered to be in the PUBLIC DOMAIN and therefore are able to be used without ga...
PUBLIC DOMAIN WORKS<br />Some PUBLIC DOMAIN WORKS include:<br />Shakespeare’s plays<br />Jane Austen novels<br />The Bible...
CREATIVE COMMONS<br />Provides an alternative to copyright licencing<br />Allows creators to grant rights for public use o...
CREATIVE COMMONS SYMBOLS<br />
Creative commons licenceD IMAGES - sources<br />
ATTRIBUTION OF AUTHOR -text<br />Always credit or “cite” the author:<br />On a “Bibliography” or “References” page of a re...
ATTRIBUTION OF AUTHOR -IMAGES<br />Always credit or “cite” the author:<br />List the copyright information underneath any ...
ATTRIBUTION OF AUTHOR -Internet resources<br />Always credit or “cite” the author of copyrighted works from a website:<br ...
REFERENCES<br />‘About the licences’ (n.d.) (Internet) http://creativecommons.org.au/learn-more/licences accessed 29 May 2...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Copyright and you!

343

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
343
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Copyright and you!"

  1. 1. © COPYRIGHT AND YOU!<br />
  2. 2. WHAT IS COPYRIGHT?<br />Laws created to protect authors and artists who create “original” works<br />Original works can only be copied, performed in public, or published by the creator unless they give permission to someone else to do this<br />That’s what it means to have the right to copy (copyright)<br />
  3. 3. COPYRIGHT IN AUSTRALIA<br />Australian copyright law is contained in a piece of federal legislation called: <br />The Copyright Act 1968<br />Amendments were made to this Act in 2000 to take into account the use of digital technologies<br />
  4. 4. WHAT IS NOT PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT?<br />Works that have not been written or recorded (your stories, if they are not written down, are not protected by copyright law)<br />Ideas, procedures, methods, discoveries<br />Works that contain no original authorship (for example: standard calendars, height and weight charts, tape measures and rulers, etc.)<br />Lists of data (such as the telephone book)<br />Items in the public domain – generally 70 years after the death of the creator<br />Facts<br />
  5. 5. HOWEVER…<br />Students are exempted from some of this through the use of ”FAIR DEALING”for educational purposes<br />
  6. 6. WHAT IS FAIR DEALING?<br />“Fair Dealing” exceptions allow students to use copyright works for their studies, within limits<br />That means that students can reproduce a limited amount of copyright material for the purposes of research or study<br />
  7. 7. FAIR DEALING GUIDELINES<br />Sometimes, it is hard to know how much of a copyrighted work you can use.<br />The following guidelines may help when knowing what is ‘fair dealing’<br />
  8. 8. FAIR DEALING GUIDELINES<br />Use the smallest amount of: <br />
  9. 9. FAIR DEALING AND THE INTERNET<br />If a work is published in electronic form, a reasonable portion is not more than 10% of the work, or one chapter if applicable<br />Images used should preferably be those with Creative Commons Licences and always cited<br />
  10. 10. PUBLIC DOMAIN WORKS<br />Some works are considered to be in the PUBLIC DOMAIN and therefore are able to be used without gaining permission under the following circumstances:<br />If it is more than 70 years since the creator’s death and copyright has expired<br />Copyright has been forfeited<br />Copyright does not apply<br /> However it must still be ‘cited’ and attributed to the creator within a bibliography<br />
  11. 11. PUBLIC DOMAIN WORKS<br />Some PUBLIC DOMAIN WORKS include:<br />Shakespeare’s plays<br />Jane Austen novels<br />The Bible<br />Music by classical composers such as Mozart, Beethoven, Bach<br />Project Gutenberg – source of books in the public domain<br />
  12. 12. CREATIVE COMMONS<br />Provides an alternative to copyright licencing<br />Allows creators to grant rights for public use of their work – usually images<br />Creative Commons work is identified by use of symbols assigned by the creator<br />
  13. 13. CREATIVE COMMONS SYMBOLS<br />
  14. 14. Creative commons licenceD IMAGES - sources<br />
  15. 15. ATTRIBUTION OF AUTHOR -text<br />Always credit or “cite” the author:<br />On a “Bibliography” or “References” page of a report or presentation, include (if available):<br />The author’s name<br />The date of publication<br />The title of the work<br />The publisher and place of publication <br />Example:<br />Reader, Ima (2011) “Reading is fun” Penguin, Melbourne.<br />
  16. 16. ATTRIBUTION OF AUTHOR -IMAGES<br />Always credit or “cite” the author:<br />List the copyright information underneath any copyrighted images used and include them in the ‘Bibliography’<br />Include<br />The date of publication<br /> The author’s name<br /> Example:<br />© 2006 Nick Hopgood<br />
  17. 17. ATTRIBUTION OF AUTHOR -Internet resources<br />Always credit or “cite” the author of copyrighted works from a website:<br />On a “Bibliography” or “references” page of a report or presentation, include (if available):<br />The Author’s name<br /> The Title of the Work<br /> The name of the Site<br /> The date it was posted on the Web or revised<br /> The date you obtained the work from the Web<br /> The Web site’s address (URL)<br />Example:<br />Kaemming, Laura ‘Copyright lesson plan’ (2001) accessed 28th May 2011 http://www.cyberbee.com/copyrpln.pdf<br />
  18. 18. REFERENCES<br />‘About the licences’ (n.d.) (Internet) http://creativecommons.org.au/learn-more/licences accessed 29 May 2011<br />‘Copyright – Cyberbee’ (n.d.) (Internet) http://www.cyberbee.com/cb_copyright.swf accessed 28 May 2011<br />‘Copyright information for students’ (2010) (Internet) http://www.education.vic.gov.au/management/governance/copyright/schools/infostudents.htm accessed 28 May 2011 <br />‘Copyright, privacy and cyber ethics’ (n.d.) (Interent) http://debsplace.wikispaces.com/Copyright,+Privacy+%26+Cyber+Ethics accessed 30 May 2011<br />‘Smart copying’ (n.d.) (Interent) http://www.smartcopying.edu.au/scw/go accessed 29 May 2011<br />

×