Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Arvai Cc

236
views

Published on

Published in: Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
236
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. ma ny) (o f Five Obstacles to Effective  Climate Decisions:  A Decision Science Perspective  Dr. Joseph Arvai  Environmental Science & Policy Program  Michigan State University  East Lansing, MI  Decision Research  Eugene, OR 
  • 2. Acknowledgements  National Science Foundation  SES 0350777  University of British Columbia  Natural Resources Canada  The Government of Nunavut
  • 3. Introduction  •  The following  discussion stems  from decision aiding  work carried out in  two contexts;  adaptation to  climate change in:  –  Coastal British  Columbia  –  Nunavut Territory
  • 4. Introduction  •  Though quite different  in terms of the levels of  development and  infrastructure, both  study sites shared a  common complaint:  –  Despite years of  research (and millions of  dollars spent) people  were seeing very little in  the way of adaptation  action.  –  “You can’t study our  problems away…”
  • 5. Introduction  •  Five common concerns:  1.  The data used to describe the problems associated with  climate change are frequently not meaningful or helpful.  2.  The objectives and concerns of affected stakeholders  are not receiving sufficient attention.  3.  The attributes and measures used to characterize  climate change impacts, and the anticipated  consequences of alternative management plans, are  often inadequate.  4.  Ongoing research is often only loosely tied to the  decisions that need to be made.  5.  There seems to be very little learning from past success  stories as well as mistakes.
  • 6. Data
  • 7. Numeracy Issues  •  Probabilistic information, even in the absence of  uncertainty, proves to be difficult for most people.
  • 8. Dual Processing  •  SYSTEM 1 is fast,  intuitive, highly  inductive, and based  heavily on our  instinctive emotional  (affective) responses to  stimuli.  •  SYSTEM 2, is slower,  based on rules of logic  and rationality, highly  deductive, and based  heavily on effortful  calculation.
  • 9. Numeracy Issues  9% Red Beans  10% Red Beans  A  B  •  5% of high­numerate individuals select from Bowl B.  •  37% of low­numerate individuals select from Bowl A.  Peters, E., D. Vastfjall, P. Slovic, C.K. Mertz, K. Mazzocco, and S. Dickert. 2006.  Numeracy and decision making.  Psychological Science, 17: 407­413.
  • 10. Numbers and Nerves  15  13.6  12.9  11.7  10.9  10.4  10  5  0  150  98%  95%  90%  85%  Number and Percent of 150 Lives Saved  Slovic, P., M. Finucane, E. Peters, and D.G. MacGregor. 2004.  Risk as analysis and risk as  feelings: Some thoughts about affect, reason, risk, and rationality.  Risk Analysis, 24: 1­12.
  • 11. Psychophysical Numbing
  • 12. Psychophysical Numbing  “I am deeply moved if I see one man  suffering and would risk my life for him.  Then I talk impersonally about the possible  pulverization of our big cities, with a  hundred million dead. I am unable multiply  Value of Life Saving  one man’s suffering by a hundred million.”  ­ Albert Szent Gyorgi 0   1  2  N  Number of Lives at Risk 
  • 13. Psychophysical Numbing
  • 14. Objectives  •  The objectives of stakeholders and decision  makers are the basis for considering any  decision.  •  Therefore, the first step in any decision process  is for those involved to carefully consider their  objectives by clearly defining what it is they want  to achieve in a given decision context.  •  This objectives­focus is in contrast to an  alternatives­focus, which involves analyzing the  available alternatives and selecting the ‘best’ one  from a set of implied, and often poorly defined,  criteria.
  • 15. Objectives  •  Despite their importance during decision making,  a thoughtful and thorough exploration of  objectives that will guide a decision is only  seldom undertaken.  •  Decision makers and stakeholders seldom  differentiate between means and ends  objectives.  –  This is important because decisions about climate  change are also linked to other areas of concern.
  • 16. Attributes & Measures  •  World Summit on Sustainable Development,  Johannesburg 2002  •  Indicators in Integrated Coastal Management,  Ottawa 2002  •  Much of the focus has been on the  identification of natural processes that require  further scientific study and/or should be  closely monitored in response to climate  drivers.  •  Inventories with an emphasis on establishing  changes relative to some baseline.
  • 17. Attributes & Measures  •  Inventory data frequently does not provide  the kinds of insights that decision makers  desire (but they end up “using” it anyway):  –  …because they often remove focus from what  matters to stakeholders and decision makers (i.e.,  their objectives).  –  …because they are not presented at the  appropriate temporal or geographic scale.  –  …because they fail to expose key tradeoffs that  will need to be addressed.
  • 18. Attributes & Measures  Inventory  Attribute  Measure  Option 1  Option 2  Option 3  Option 4  Sea level rise  cm/100 yr.  ­  ­  ­  ­  No. of flood  Flood frequency  ­  ­  ­  ­  days  Degree of erosion  Ha  ­  ­  ­  ­  Fraser River freshet 1  Timing  ­  ­  ­  ­  Fraser River freshet 2  Duration  ­  ­  ­  ­  Inventory Data Fraser River freshet 3  Volume  ­  ­  ­  ­  Fraser River freshet 4  Max. Flow  ­  ­  ­  ­  Water Quality  Several  ­  ­  ­  ­  No. of Surge  Storm Surge  ­  ­  ­  ­  Days  Rate of  Subsidence  ­  ­  ­  ­  Compaction 
  • 19. Attributes & Measures  Objective  Attribute  Measure  Option 1  Option 2  Option 3  Option 4  Area of shorebird habitat  Ha  ­  ­  ­  ­  Biofilm exposure  Ha  ­  ­  ­  ­  % Change in key indicator  spp. (Dunlin, Western  %  ­  ­  ­  ­  Sandpiper)  Maintain/Improve  Environmental Health Extent of eelgrass beds  Ha  ­  ­  ­  ­  Constructed  Marsh stability  ­  ­  ­  ­  Index  2  Benthic biomass  gC/m  ­  ­  ­  ­  TEK­based  TEK  ­  ­  ­  ­ 
  • 20. Attributes & Measures  Objective  Attribute  Measure  Option 1  Option 2  Option 3  Option 4  Flood damge (property  $  ­  ­  ­  ­  and structures) 1  Flood damge (property  No. High  ­  ­  ­  ­  and structures) 2  Water Days  Weighted User  Reacreational activities  ­  ­  ­  ­  Days  Socioeconomic  Dependability of BC  % On­Time  ­  ­  ­  ­  (Quality of Life) Ferries  Sailings  Heritage and First Nation  Constructed  ­  ­  ­  ­  SItes  Index  Citizen confidence in  Constructed  ­  ­  ­  ­  protection measures  Index  Annual adaptation costs  $  ­  ­  ­  ­  (municipailties) 
  • 21. Attributes & Measures  Objective  Attribute  Measure  Option 1  Option 2  Option 3  Option 4  Flood damge (property  $  A  B  C  D  and structures) 1  Flood damge (property  No. High  E  F  G  H  and structures) 2  Water Days  Weighted User  Reacreational activities  I  J  K  L  Days  Socioeconomic  Dependability of BC  % On­Time  M  N  O  P  (Quality of Life) Ferries  Sailings  Heritage and First Nation  Constructed  Q  R  S  T  SItes  Index  Citizen confidence in  Constructed  U  V  W  X  protection measures  Index  Annual adaptation costs  $  $25 Mil. (CAD)  $24 Mil. (CAD)  $25 Mil. (CAD)  $26 Mil. (CAD)  (municipailties) 
  • 22. Attributes & Measures  Objective  Attribute  Measure  Option 1  Option 2  Option 3  Option 4  Flood damge (property  $  A  B  C  D  and structures) 1  Flood damge (property  No. High  E  F  G  H  and structures) 2  Water Days  Weighted User  Reacreational activities  I  J  K  L  Days  Socioeconomic  Dependability of BC  % On­Time  85% 91% 78% 93%  (Quality of Life) Ferries  Sailings Heritage and First Nation  Constructed  Q  R  S  T  SItes  Index  Citizen confidence in  Constructed  U  V  W  X  protection measures  Index  Annual adaptation costs  $ $25 Mil. (CAD) $24 Mil. (CAD) $25 Mil. (CAD) $26 Mil. (CAD)  (municipailties) 
  • 23. Research & Monitoring Needs  •  Analytic­Deliberative Process.  –  Several successive rounds of deliberation by  stakeholders and analysis by technical experts  as part of a deliberate march towards a risk  management decision.  •  Each successive round of analysis and  deliberation is meant to yield an improved  understanding on the part of both the  stakeholders and experts regarding the  various attributes that are “at risk” in an  ecological system.  •  The analytic­deliberative process is not  simply a means for synthesizing the  information obtained through a set of  unrelated and predominantly expert­driven  risk assessments; it is an important shaper of  a long­range risk assessment and decision  making process.
  • 24. Learning Over Time  •  Climate decisions are questions  masquerading as answers.  •  If we view decisions as  questions, then the outcomes of  these decisions become  treatments, in an experimental  sense.  •  Adaptive management has two  key parts:  1.  Implementing varied climate  “treatments” (e.g., across space and  time).  2.  Monitoring, learning, and adjusting.
  • 25. Learning Over Time  RESILIENCE  •  Many would argue that,  globally speaking, we’ve  already done serious  damage to the climate.  •  Decisions aimed at  reducing and responding  to the effects of climate  change should help (vs.  hurt).
  • 26. Learning Over Time  SCALE  •  There is often a need to  focus narrowly, in terms  of time and space, during  decision making.  •  Spatially varied climate  management  “treatments” are already  in place.  –  e.g., forestry projects in  India; energy projects in  Europe, fuel taxes in  Canada, Daylight Saving  Time in Australia (2000).
  • 27. Learning Over Time  ETHICAL CONCERNS  •  Sadly, the global  economy in concert with  regional variability  in  climate already  inequitably distributes  costs and vulnerability  across communities and  places.
  • 28. Learning Over Time  COMPLEXITY  •  Overall, the basic  framework for carrying  out adaptive climate  management is already  in place.  •  What’s missing is a  system for monitoring  and learning.
  • 29. Recommendations  Time  Not (Necessarily) Software  Commitment  Expertise
  • 30. Contact Information  Dr. Joe Arvai  E­Mail: arvai@msu.edu  Telephone: 517­353­0694  Facsimile: 517­353­8994  Web: http://www.msu.edu/~sknkwrks