Opening up government for outcomes (14DEC11 webcast)

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Presentation from our December 14, 2011 webcast with a distinguished panel of public sector leaders: Jose Alonso (Open Data Program leader, World Wide Web Foundation); Dr. Bitange Ndemo (Permanent …

Presentation from our December 14, 2011 webcast with a distinguished panel of public sector leaders: Jose Alonso (Open Data Program leader, World Wide Web Foundation); Dr. Bitange Ndemo (Permanent Secretary, Kenya Ministry of Information & Communications) and Chris Vein (U.S. Deputy CTO, Executive Office of the President). Onward to outcomes ...

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  • 1. IBM Institute for Business ValueGlobal Public SectorOpening Up GovernmentHow to unleash the power of information for neweconomic growthDecember 14, 2011 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 2. Welcome to today’s briefing on“Opening up government for outcomes” Agenda Report highlights Sietze Dijkstra Global Government Industry Leader Panel discussion: Perspectives from IBM Global Services Government Questions and Answers We will discuss how “open” has evolved yet again toward greater engagement for shared outcomes such as new economic growth2 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 3. Today’s speakers Lynn Reyes Dr. Bitange Chris Vein Jose M. Alonso Ndemo Public Sector Leader, Permanent Secretary Deputy U.S. Chief Program Manager, IBM Institute for Ministry of Information Technology Officer, Open Data Program Business Value and Communications Executive Office of the World Wide Web Government of Kenya President Foundation Panel moderator3 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 4. Senior officials are telling us that they are faced withchanging circumstances Big data: Still collecting a great deal of data, persistent data paradox* Experimenting with Open Data, Open Government initiatives, compounding ( + )* = Complexity from national to local govts, from one agency to another They report three other realities about government information Governments are Touchpoints to that Rising pressures for not going to stop data are expanding far data access by citizens collecting data beyond government and businesses (central strategic asset) (people, systems, and devices) (uses, users of data skyrocketing)* The management dilemma of having too much data and too little insight4 Source: The power of analytics for public sector: Building analytics competency to accelerate outcomes, IBM Institute for Business Value, 2011 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 5. Open government embodies different principles andbehaviors – open data is part of the picture – but perhapsthe easier part Intent Their definitions have evolved5 Source: IBM Institute for Business Value © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 6. Open government and open data – distinct but intertwined Open government requires open data Open data does NOT mean “all data” Open data does NOT mean “no management”, it means different management Open government does NOT mean “no government”, it means different government6 Source: IBM Institute for Business Value © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 7. Meanwhile, economic and fiscal uncertainty is intensifying;new jobs from new and smarter economic developmentmust occur General Govt Gross Debt v. GDP Growth Rates General gross debt GDP growth rate (% GDP) (%, constant prices)7 Source: IMF World Economic Outlook Database April 2011, Eurostat © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 8. A variety of initiatives are already underway that involvesharing data for economic development outcomes Types of open practices for economic development  Providing raw data  “Seeding” innovation  Enabling collective problem solving  Creating the “bazaar” Rule of thumb: The most used are the most valuable … for now8 Source: IBM Institute for Business Value © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 9. RecommendationsThe potential benefitsare compelling … Citizens and businesses Government… sensible, sustainable models are key!9 Source: IBM Institute for Business Value © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 10. To sustain the benefits and potential of open, it must bemanaged Sustainability Gap – the difference between intent and real change Open paradigm With adaptation Momentum Sustainability MIND THE GAP Gap Inflection point: Open Govt 2.0 paradigm Strategic “Closed” recognition Without paradigm adaptation “Lock-in” ~2000 Today New “lock- Time ins”10 Source: IBM Institute for Business Value © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 11. One of the best places to start / continue with – informationyou already have to spur economic development outcomes Spectrum of Public Sector Information (PSI) and Public Content Domains (neither mutually exclusive nor collectively exhaustive) Public Content Public Sector Information Key objective = content availability / diffusion, Key objective = commercial, non-commercial11 preservation reuse © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 12. Opening up is incremental, additive and experiential withexpectations are shifting toward more engaged interactions Open government is a journey • desired shared outcomes • relevant information areas • degree of openness • usage Start simply • experience • challenge and evolve, • progress • opportunityapplying open • impact • challengeprinciples and • opportunity standards12 Source: IBM Institute for Business Value © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 13. “Opening up government” panel Dr. Bitange Chris Vein Jose M. Ndemo Alsonso Permanent Secretary Deputy U.S. Chief Program Manager, Ministry of Information Technology Officer, Open Data Program and Communications Executive Office of the World Wide Web Government of Kenya President Foundation13 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 14. Dr. Bitange Ndemo, Permanent SecretaryKenya Ministry of Information and Communications Built several open access platforms including the TEAMS Undersea Cable, the National Optic Fibre Broadband Infrastructure and the Last Mile Infrastructure Currently promoting Open Government Initiative in the East Africa Region Instrumental in developing Kenyas Open Government Portal and Kenyas Shared Services platform Building Africas first Green, Smart and Open City – Konza Technology Park Some practical lessons learned – Expect resistance even where it is least expected. – Data is not information – we need to analyze it further and market it – Apply patience and persuasiveness in any system implementation14 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 15. Chris Vein, Deputy U.S. Chief Technology OfficerExecutive Office of the President Innovation = Renewal … there really is an opportunity to co-create by opening up government Currently defining ways to take ideas and turning them into repeatable, scalable approaches; strategies include: – Convene: Building communities – people with ideas, expertise – Collaborate: Developing new collaborative models with the private sector, citizens, government – Showcase: Promoting the market for open data and encouraging its use, celebrating successes Some practical lessons learned – Look at challenges in “chunks” and address them – they add up to answering the big challenge – Minimum viable solution components – The only way to change is to be involved15 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 16. Jose M. Alonso, Open Data Program ManagerWorld Wide Web Foundation Managed several Open Data projects, including national Spanish gov’t (datos.gob.es); studies in Ghana and Chile Established and led global W3C eGovernment initiative (working with data.gov.* people since 2008) Some practical lessons learned: – Excuses for not opening up are many • Start simply and with low-hanging fruits, scale-up – Open Data is not a technical issue alone • Dimensions: political, legal, organizational, technical, social, economic – Impact assessment is yet to be properly done • Need to go beyond the hype, towards sustainability16 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 17. “Opening up government” panel Dr. Bitange Chris Vein Jose M. Ndemo Alsonso Permanent Secretary Deputy U.S. Chief Program Manager, Ministry of Information Technology Officer, Open Data Program and Communications Executive Office of the World Wide Web Government of Kenya President Foundation17 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 18. Sietze Dijkstra Global Government Industry Leader IBM Global Services18 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 19. 19 IBM Institute for Business Value (www.ibm.com/ibv) © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 20. IBM Institute for Business ValueGlobal Public SectorBACKUPSOpening up governmentThe following have more detail on selected slides ofthe main presentation © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 21. A variety of initiatives are already underway around the world thatinvolve sharing data with citizens for economic development Types of open practices for economic development  Providing “raw”, raw material (data) Providing raw  Providing usable raw data (usable formats) data  Aggregating sources (originators of “open” datasets) of datasets into data catalogues (to promote data discovery) “Seeding”  Sponsoring free form contests for innovative uses of data innovation  Awarding prize monies Enabling  Issue driven; providing issue-based content, selected collective problem analyses and support solving  Galvanizing a “network” around an issue to address  Loose integration of all of the above into a community Creating the  Developing an “engaged community” and a strong brand “bazaar”*  Monitoring and analyzing usage and applying insights * A takeoff from the Eric Raymond’s seminal essay, The Cathedral and the Bazaar, Rule of thumb: The most used are the most valuable21 © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 22. One of the best places to start or continue with is information youalready have to spur economic development outcomes Public Sector Information (PSI) and Public Content Domains* Public Content Public Sector Information Key objective = content availability / diffusion, preservation Key objective = commercial and non-commercial reuse * A spectrum; neither mutually exclusive nor collectively exhaustive Source: [Adapted] Digital Broadband Content: Public Sector Information and Content, Working Party on the Information Economy, Committee for22 Information, Computer and Communications Policy, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, OECD report declassified March, 2006. © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 23. The potential benefits are compelling ... to realize them, strategically integrate, execute on and measure four areas Recommendations and potential benefits In the process, Benefits to citizens Governments can …• Allows citizens to use the • Collect new revenues data in ways – even generated by new create new services – that economic development are important to them propelled by citizens• Encourages creation of • Demonstrate open new jobs through principles in practical ways innovative uses of data • Gain insights into what• Enables citizens to really matters engage meaningfully with government and • Avoid costs associated experience “open” with new services • Improve the way government works 23 Source: IBM Institute for Business Value © 2011 IBM Corporation
  • 24. To sustain the benefits and potential of open, it must be managed Sustainability Gap – the difference between intent and real change * * As interconnectedness and instrumentation increases, big data will become even bigger, presenting more complex policy issues that will need to be addressed such as security, privacy, intellectual property24 © 2011 IBM Corporation