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How Social Networking is Changing How We Collaborate and Share Information

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The "social" factor in the way things really work and how we might think about it from discovery, strategic planning and design, execution, measurement and management. …

The "social" factor in the way things really work and how we might think about it from discovery, strategic planning and design, execution, measurement and management.

Presentation made at the Convurge Conference in June 2007.

Published in: Business, Technology, Education

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  • What is SNA? A group The population being studied e.g. the senior leadership across divisions, a delivery team A set of nodes The actors. They could be people or organizations or countries Attributes Nodes have attributes, e.g. tenure, geographical location, business unit A set of links that connect the nodes Links can have strength -- strong ties and weak ties. Relationships Each network represents a type of relationship e.g. Communication, Trust, Awareness, Turns-to We sometimes refers to these relationships as instrumental (e.g. Turns-To) or affective (e.g. Trusts)
  • A Social Network Analysis (SNA) is a set of methods and statistics that shows how people collaborate the current patterns of communication, information-sharing, decision-making and innovation within a particular organization or group The outcome of an SNA helps us to see where collaboration is breaking down, where talent and expertise could be better leveraged, where decisions are getting bogged down or where opportunities for innovation are being lost These data give us the picture we need to create a set of remedial actions for individuals, leaders and the enterprise to improve productivity, efficiency and innovation The importance of Social Network Analysis Trust is required for any institution to function Advances in communications technology have enabled a key pattern of social system development to play out in both the political and the corporate domains Recognizes the context and the community within which people discover, learn, share, make choices, work together Illuminates trust-based currencies (types of capital) that motivate, drive or influence behavior Social capital: Connections among individuals, communities and the networks and norms of reciprocity and trustworthiness that arise from them Confidence: Currency of government and other systems Ideas: Currency of innovation Social networks reveal opportunities to collaborate, problem-solve, respond, innovate, and function more effectively relevant to context or situation Surfaces unique voices and different points of view [so that government can readily identify the forefront emerging issues, ideas, passions, driving context; the receding tide before the tsunami hits] Social networks reveal opportunities to collaborate, problem-solve, respond, innovate, and function more effectively relevant to context or situation Where is collaboration is breaking down? Where could talent and expertise be better leveraged? Where are decisions getting bogged down or opportunities for innovation being lost? What is Social Network Analysis Basic concepts in Social Network Analysis Business value of Social Network Analysis
  • High Performers Bridging positions in a network; especially bridging sub-groups, levels, functions, distance Rising stars go wrong The person becomes a bottleneck Relying too much on the formal structure Disconnected expert – doesn’t use relationships to overcome skill gaps Biased networker – too much reliance on similar people Surface networker – doesn’t form trusted relationships Chameleon – constantly changing instead of promoting alignment
  • What are the characteristics of high performing teams Structure of team should fit the task High density communication to execute and coordinate on a task, but low density for innovation Bridging and bonding ties Strong and weak ties Connections with outside people for innovation
  • Navigating the triple paradox Relationships with constituents Culture and measurement systems Roles that people and organizations play Networked governance and leadership models Business and economic models Policy
  • Key questions What if these networks were visible? How could we enable, engage and leverage these networks to Define, focus and delivery “value”? Address and reconcile the Triple Paradox in the process? Given the socialization of information, how can we show / express that we’re making progress and that we’ve contributed meaningfully to the outcomes we share? Do the right things? Do things right? What does architecture have to do with it? How can we strike the balance between “elegant interactions and experiences” with “elegant design”?
  • Transcript

    • 1. How Social Networking is Changing How We Collaborate and Share Information Social Networks and Social Network Analysis Lynn Reyes IBM Corporation June 10, 2007
    • 2.
      •  Redefinition of “interaction” through the socialization of information
      •  Co-evolution of business, work and technology
      •  Shift in power structures from hierarchical to diffuse and horizontal
      •  Openness of business ecosystems, marketplaces and communities
      •  Emergence of 3D people into the global economy
      What’s going on?
      • "The way in which ideas are shared and formulated, opinions are developed and advocated, preferences created, awareness generated – all of those things, the world of ideas, the world of dialog – that world is changing ... It's one of the greatest things, most threatening things, most interesting things that has happened in our lifetimes,“
      • John Iwata,
      • Senior VP, IBM
      Avatar: Lynn Tizona
    • 3. What does this mean for government?
      • The social / human factor matters …
      • Constituents will continue to demand “more” because of the availability information and the “experiences” they have with it
        • The rise and sociotechnical fusion of the “persona”
        • Notions of time and space (collapsing)
      • Power and possibility of networks
        • Communities – social networks – become a reservoir of information as to what public outcomes truly matter
        • The patchwork of communication within these networks requires the mindset, attention and resources to turn information into societal intelligence
        • At the same time these networks are a resource for carrying out the business of government today …
        • … and shaping how the government needs to evolve tomorrow
    • 4. Social Networking applies to individuals, organizations, countries – it’s the way the world works
      • What is a social network?
      • A group
      • A set of nodes with roles and attributes
      • A set of links that connect the nodes that have strength
      • Relationships
      Nodes Links Who talks to whom
    • 5. What is Social Network Analysis (SNA) and why is it important?
      • What is it?
        • A Social Network Analysis (SNA) is a set of methods and statistics that shows how people and communities collaborate
      • Why is it important?
        • Explicitly recognizes how the world works – the context and the community within which people discover, learn, share, make choices, work together
        • Surfaces unique voices and different points of view
        • Illuminates trust-based currencies (types of capital) that motivate, drive or influence behavior
        • Facilitates problem-solving within the Triple Paradox
        • Reveals network-based opportunities to collaborate, problem-solve, respond, innovate, and function more effectively
    • 6. Social Networks Matter: The case of high performers
        • High performers occupy network positions that bridge otherwise disconnected clusters of people
      Cross et al How Top Talent Uses Networks and Where Rising Stars Get Trapped. Research Report Brian Uzzi and Shannon Dunlap. How To Build Your Network. HBR Dec 2005
    • 7. Social Networks Matter: The Case of High Performing Teams Low Performing Team High Performing Team Communication : How often do you communicate with this person about opportunities?
        • High performing teams have a richer set of connections and less centralization of communication and decision-making
    • 8. Social Networks Matter: The Structure Must Fit The Work
        • Networks are optimally structured differently for different kinds of work
      Rob Cross, Jeanne Liedtka, Leigh Weiss. A Practical Guide to Social Networks. HBR March 2005
    • 9. The socialization of information and social networking compels several key considerations
      • Navigating the Triple Paradox
        • “ Big – Small” … scope
        • “ Too much – Too little” … information
        • “ Individual – Collective” … transparency, accountability, reliability
      • Aligning culture and measurement systems
      • How the social networks shape the strategic “vocabulary”
      • How information is architected and “expressed” visually to enable
      • complex decision-making
        • Decoupling  from “IT” to “I & T”
      • Enabling collaboration while managing distributed knowledge
    • 10. Key questions
      • What if these networks were visible? Engaged differently?
      • How can we enable and leverage these networks to
        • Define, focus and deliver “value”?
        • Understand and address the Triple Paradox in the process?
      • Given the socialization of information, how can we integrate it into contributing meaningfully, making and expressing progress towards the outcomes we share?
      • What does “architecture” have to do with it?
        • How can we strike the balance between
        • “elegant interactions / experiences” and “elegant design”?