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women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
women in the media
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women in the media

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  • 1. The Roaring 20s A new woman was invented: she cut her hair, wore short skirts and makeup, smoked, drank, voted and went to petting parties. She was independent and often rebellious - she was the flapper
  • 2.
    • Pre 20's
    • 20's Advertising/Media
    • Fashion
    • Attitude
    • Sexual Revolution
    • Women in the workforce
  • 3. Pre 20s
    • Gibson Girl - the pre flapper
    • WWI- “eat, drink and be merry lifestyle” - new attitude towards appropriate lifestyles
    • Fashion- economic situations effect on fashion
    • Propaganda- first type of advertising
  • 4. Advertising/Media
    • Era of Consumerism: average purchasing power of American’s rose 40%
    • Magazines
    • Placement of ad’s shifts
    • Color
    • Vanity Fair, Ladies Home Journal, American Home Magazine, Woman’s Home Companion, daughters of the American Revolution
    • Reading percent of American’s highest ever
    • Picture show - has sound for the first time
  • 5. Advertising/Media
    • Radio - no tv yet - first radio broadcast came out November of 1920
    • Using empowerment/suffrage to sell products
    • Ads were contradictory - independence and freedom while perpetuating domestic role
    • Brand names become popular for the first time
    • Commercialization of sex- Hollywood and Madison Ave
    • Ad’s told not only how to look - but how to act too - reflected what personality traits were desirable
    • Cultural identity shaped through media
  • 6. Fashion
    • Gibson Girl
    • WWI influence on fashion
    • Origination of Flapper - 1926
    • Flapper fashion- Mary Jane shoes, short wave and curtain hair cut, clouche hats, application of make up in public, dull drab colors, 1st patented bra, smoked, partied and drank
    • Chanel - Fair isle - unisex
    • Not all women were flappers in the 20's, but all women’s styles were affected to a degree with flapper fashion
  • 7. Attitude
    • Contradictory - 19th amendment passed
    • Flapper: “young, smart, sophisticated, unafraid, powerful individual with sexual allure” - all lively illustrations of flappers used in advertisements
    • Entertainment and free time encouraged for the first time
  • 8. “ Sexual Revolution” - “sexual liberation” - “sexual freedom”
    • Phrase invented by advertising industry
    • Petting Parties
    • Women still expected to be virgins until married/engaged
    • Margaret Sanger - Birth Control Controversy
  • 9. Women in the Workforce
    • Women in the workforce still few and far between
    • 400,000 more women receive college educations from 1900 - 1930
    • Domestic life still reinforced by advertising industry
    • Work only acceptable between college and marriage
    • Almost all jobs women held during the war went back to men after its end
    • Nellie Tayloe Ross of Wyoming becomes the first women elected governor of a State
  • 10. Nifty 50s Clean and proper, the all-American homemaker stereotype of women was imposed like never before. Television was born, as public figures endorsed and advertisers promoted the views of a woman’s “true” role.
  • 11.
    • Pre 50s
    • Golden Age of Television
    • Portrayal of Women
    • Fashion
  • 12. Pre 50s
    • WWII
    • “ Rosie the Riveter”
    • TV nonexistent
  • 13. Golden Age of Television
    • Became a national medium
    • New way for information to be spread
    • Pedagogic tool
    • Encouraged ideology through motion picture
  • 14. Portrayal of Women
    • Stereotypical housewives
      • Post WWII and the Baby Boom
      • Gender specific roles
      • June Cleaver in Leave it to Beaver
      • I Love Lucy
    • Innocent, proper, good girls
      • Sandra Dee
      • Doris Day
    • Working woman
      • Frowned upon
  • 15.
    • Conservative and proper
      • Stiff dresses with pinched-in wastes, gloves, heels, short hair/neat up-do
    • Rock n roll
      • Teenage rebellion
      • Poodle skirt, tight fitting blouses, pedal pushers, saddle shoes
    • American Bandstand
    • Movie Stars
    Fashion
  • 16. Bitchin’ 60s
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  • 17.
    • Early 1960s
    • Music – Girl Groups
    • Gender Boundaries - Mid 1960s
  • 18. Early 1960s
    • nation’s sexual revolution
      • happened to coincide with the advent of puberty for millions of girls in the baby boom generation
    • Media’s mixed messages for girls
  • 19. Music - Girl Groups
    • Music’s ability to voice contradictory messages
      • girls were received messages and pushed to shape into some sort of solid identity for themselves
    • Songs
      • Either about getting away from the male-centered culture and /or being more autonomous and sexually librated
  • 20. Gender Boundaries - Mid 1960s
    • Girls and boys were beginning to look and act a bit more like each other all the time
    • Models
      • Beatles unisex clothes
      • Women in the media such as Jackie Kennedy and Katherine Hepburn
  • 21. Radical 80s
    • Welcome to the 1980s. A decade where women were more focused on themselves, stopped taking crap from men, and had an attitude all their own which they carried with them in the workforce, at home, and in their appearance. Oprah had the hottest talk show and everyone ditched the disco flare and the farah fawcett hair of the 70s. We rolled into the 80s looking like Madonna with teased hair, or Olivia Newton John with skin tight leggings and legwarmers.
  • 22.
    • Fashion/Appearance
    • Careers/Workforce
    • Advertising/Media
    • Liberation/Homelife
  • 23. Fashion/Appearance
    • Farah to Madonna
    • Madonna wanna-be’s or preppy career women
    • Major turning point in fashion
    • Butts- the tighter the better
    • Karen Carpenter
    • L'Oreal free hold styling mousse
    • Guess/Jordache jeans
    • Girly athleticism
    • Aerobics as the “it” workout
  • 24. Careers/Workforce
    • Education
    • Sandra Day O’Conner and Sally Ride
    • Hottest talk show in America
  • 25. Advertising/Media
    • Valley Girl handbook takes junior high schools by storm
    • Most intriguing people include women
    • Top TV sitcoms and movies
    • Madonna’s Pepsi commercial
    • Secret deodorant
    • Condom commercials seen on TV for the first time
    • Playboy and Penthouse
    • MTV and HBO have their premiers
  • 26. Liberation/Homelife
    • Head of household
    • Newsweeks news of the single woman in the 80s
    • Vanna white becomes a household name
    • The center for woman’s policy alternatives
    • Perrick Bell leaves Harvard Law School for lack of African-American female professors
    • Mark Lapine shooting incident
    • Mothers with children in the 80s
  • 27.
    • An independent women arises. She is self sufficient, wears designer clothing, and helps support her family
    A New Millennium
  • 28.
    • Fashion
    • Attitude
    • Sexual Revolution
    • Advertising/Media
    • Women in the workforce
  • 29. Fashion
    • Anything goes? emerges as fashion credo
    • Not worrying about what other people think
    • Not dressing your age
    • Experiencing more
    • Thousands of women are defying the fashion experts, and are determined to continue exposing their bodies and showing their legs
    • The Paris Hilton look- Straight hair, big earrings, miniskirts, tight tops, lots of color and animal prints, designer hand bags and large framed sunglasses.
    • Tattoos go mainstream. Has become an international fashion statement
    • In 2000, Britney Spears gets her naval pierced in Hawaii
  • 30. Attitude
    • Every possible way of making life more worthwhile has been promoted, awakening the spirit of adventure, even into outer space
    • Attitudes of mind have changed in business, politics, and social life
    • Old standards have been left behind
  • 31. Sexual Revolution
    • Women have premarital sex is common.
    • Plastic surgery is a trend
    • Sex is talked about more openly
    • San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom really started something on February 12, 2004, when he ordered city clerks to begin issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples
    • AIDS is at its highest. In 2000, 2.6 million worldwide died from the disease
    • An estimated 65 million people have an STD in America
  • 32. Advertising/Media
    • Women get the ?look? from Magazines, television, internet and movie stars
    • Allure, Cosmopolitan, Glamour, Good Housekeeping, Redbook, Vanity Fair, Seventeen, Vogue are popular
    • In 2002, camera phones were invented
    • TV show ?Sex in the City?
  • 33. Women in the Workforce
    • More independent, is not depending on a man?s support
    • Feminism has dramatically expanded women?s job opportunities
    • Over half of the work force is now composed of women
    • Attained positions of prestige
    • Women have doubled their responsibilities, taking care of a family and having a career (Compared to women in the 50?s who only had a domestic job)
    • The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) celebrates the achievements of the world?s women on 8 March 2000, the first International Women?s Day of the new millennium

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