Civil War Curriculum

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Civil War Curriculum

  1. 1. THE Civil War Curriculum by the Civilwar.org/curriculum Elementary March 2011 Endorsed by
  2. 2. Dear Civil War Educator, We are pleased to present The Civil War Curriculum, a set of nine standards-based lessons. Created by classroom teachers and our education department, The Civil War Curriculum is an easy-to-use, interdisciplinary, resource-rich guide for teaching the American Civil War. Each lesson plan follows one of the nine goals laid out in the Scope and Sequence. The entire curriculum should take approximately two-weeks or ten classroom meetings to complete. The goals have all been aligned with the National Council for Social Studies Standards and should fit easily within your state Social Studies standards, as well as many of your state Language Arts standards. The final assessment is a multiple choice exam with a document based question. The exam asks questions related to the material in all nine lessons. The document based question asks students to use their knowledge of the Civil War and their ability to analyze primary sources to think critically about some of the major Civil War issues. While each of the lessons in The Civil War Curriculum matches a goal, if you decide that you would like to spend more time on a certain topic, there are many more lessons available online at Civilwar.org/education. Thank you for using our educational resources. We look forward to your feedback on Civilwar.org/curriculum. Sincerely, CIVIL WAR TRUST Saving America s Civil War Battlefields
  3. 3. Acknowledgements The Civil War Trust would like to thank the following educators for their efforts in helping to create The Civil War Curriculum. Their combined experience of more than a century in education helped shape the final product into a teacher and student friendly educational resource. Paula Gidjunis Retired Social Studies Teacher Cheryle Hodges 5th Grade Social Studies and Science Teacher Courthouse Road Elementary, Virginia Robert Housch Social Studies Teacher South Western School District, Pennsylvania Carolyn Ivanoff Housemaster Shelton Intermediate School, Connecticut Jon J. Lehman 7th Grade Civics Teacher A.G. Wright Middle School, Virginia Sheralyn Morehouse 5th Grade Teacher Mt. Tipton Elementary School, Arizona Bob Rinehart 8th Grade Social Studies, American History Teacher Southhampton Middle School, Maryland Rosanne Zajko Teacher Librarian Ancillae Assumpta Academy, Pennsylvania
  4. 4. ELEMENTARY OVERALL GOAL: Students will identify the cause and effects of the American Civil War politically, economically, militarily, and culturally. GOAL 1 Pre-1860: Disunion GOAL 2 1861: The Country Goes to War GOAL 3 1862: Antietam & Emancipation GOAL 4 Life at War GOAL 5 The Home Front Students will be able to identify the causes of the American Civil War. Students will be able to describe the state of the nation and sequence the first events of the Civil War. Students will be able to state the meaning and impact of the Emancipation Proclamation. Students will be able to describe the day-to-day life of a Civil War soldier. Students will be able to list examples of work done on the home front and describe how news traveled to the home front. NCSS I, II, III, V, VI, VII, X NCSS I, II, III, V, VI, VIII NCSS I, V, VI, X NCSS I, II, IV, V, VI NCSS I, II, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII GOAL 6 1863: Shifting Tides GOAL 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End GOAL 8 Post-1865: Effects of the War GOAL 9 Preserving the Memory ASSESSMENT Students will be able to discuss the effects of the battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg, paying particular attention to the Gettysburg Address. Students will be able to list and discuss the sequence of events leading to the end of the Civil War, paying special attention to the election of 1864. Students will be able to discuss the effects of the Civil War. Students will be able to illustrate ways in which they can preserve the memory of the war. Students will complete a standardized test with document based question. NCSS II, V, VI, X NCSS II, III, V, VI NCSS I, II, V, VI, X NCSS II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, X
  5. 5. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum GOAL 1 | LESSON PLAN | ELEMENTARY Pre-1861: Disunion GRADES: Elementary APPROXIMATE LENGTH OF TIME: 50 min. GOAL: Students will be able to identify the causes of the American Civil War. OBJECTIVES: 1. Students will be able to compare the cultures and economies of the Northern and Southern states. 2. Students will be able to summarize the main points of the Missouri Compromise, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and the Declaration of Causes of the Seceding States. 3. Students will be able to discuss the actions of John Brown at Harpers Ferry and the reaction of the country. MATERIALS: 1. Chart Paper 2. Sticky notes 3. Comparing Cultures and Economies Chart 4. Drawing Paper 5. Crayons 6. Scissors 7. Glue 8. Disunion Information Cards (with questions) 9. John Brown PowerPoint 10. Comparing Cultures and Economies Essay ANTICIPATORY SET/HOOK: 1. Ask: What is your favorite thing to do? Have students their response on a sticky note and put the note on a sheet of chart paper labeled Our Favorite Things.
  6. 6. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre 1860: Disunion The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 2. Read aloud a few of these items. 3. Tell students to consider no longer being able to do the things they like the most. 4. On a new sticky note, have students write how losing things makes them feel. 5. Put these on a separate sheet of chart paper labeled Losing Our Favorite Things, and have several students discuss their feelings. 6. Ask the students to think about what it might be like to never have the opportunity to do a favorite activity again- or how their lives may be different if they could no longer play with or use something they love. Example: What might it be like to never be able to play with your best friend again, or how would you feel if there were no more television shows to watch or video games to play? 7. Now we are going to learn about a time when some people felt they were losing their way of life, while others who never had the opportunity to experience certain things were able to for the first time. PROCEDURE: Activity 1 1. Hand out a Comparing Cultures and Economies Chart to each child. 2. Read over the information as a class and discuss. 3. Ask for suggestions as to how you could illustrate the information on the chart. 4. Work in small groups, using the information on the chart to draw an illustration of life in the North and life in the South. 5. Display these pictures around the classroom or in the hallway. Activity 2 1. Place students into small groups of 3 or 4. 2. Give each group a set of Disunion Information Cards. 3. Have students cut out the cards and place them in chronological order. 4. Ask each small group to read the information on the cards. 5. Have each small group use the cards to answer the associated questions as a group. Activity 3 1. Print the John Brown PowerPoint with the notes for yourself and the students. 2. Hand out copies of the John Brown PowerPoint with those notes. 3. Present the John Brown PowerPoint. 4. Complete the discussion questions on the last slide, either discussing as a class or having students write their answers.
  7. 7. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre 1860: Disunion The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum CLOSURE: 1. Ask: Based on what we learned today, do you think people knew a war was coming? Do you think they could have worked harder to solve their problems without violence? What else do you think they could have done before going to war? 2. Using the Comparing Cultural and Economies Essay, discuss the differences between the Northern and Southern states. ASSESSMENT IN THIS LESSON: 1. Illustration of life in the North and life in the South. 2. Disunion Information Cards and question sheet. 3. Informal assessment during John Brown presentation questions. 4. A Written paragraph comparing the cultural and economic differences between the Northern and Southern states.
  8. 8. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary School Civilwar.org/curriculum The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre-1860: Disunion Comparing Cultures and Economies Chart Name: _________________ Date: _________________ North South Slavery Opposed For the most part, Northerners did not support slave labor. Some Northerners called themselves abolitionists and worked to end slavery. Generally Supported While most Southerners did not own slaves, for the most part Southerners supported the practice of slavery. Many relied on slavery for social, economic, and political reasons. Cultural Urban While there were plenty of farms, large cities such as New York and Boston existed in the North as well as many smaller cities. Rural While large cities existed, homes and farms tended to be spread apart. Economic Manufacturing While there were factories throughout the country, most were in the North. Free citizens were paid to work in these factories. Agricultural While there was farming throughout the country, the large plantation farms were in the South. Slaves worked on the plantations. Constitutional Federal Many in the North felt strongly that the United States should remain a union of states with a supportive federal government. States Rights Many in the South supported states rights and, believed that the federal government should have less power.
  9. 9. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre- 1860: Disunion Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Disunion Information Cards 1820 Missouri Compromise In 1818, Missouri sought admission to the Union as a slave-holding state. After two years of bitter debate, the Missouri Compromise was agreed upon. This compromise admitted Missouri to the Union as a slave state and admitted Maine as a free state to maintain the balance in the Senate. The compromise prohibited slavery north of latitude 36° 30 in the Louisiana Purchase territory, with the exception of Missouri, and allowed it south of that line. 1831 Nat Turner s Rebellion Nat Turner, a slave, along with 60 other slaves, led a violent rebellion that resulted in the deaths of more than 50 Virginians. Nat and many others were executed for their part, or suspected part, in the revolt. Nat Turner s Rebellion struck long-term fear in the hearts of slave owners, who placed new restrictions on slaves, and it prompted a national debate on the slavery question.
  10. 10. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre- 1860: Disunion The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 1852 Declaration of Causes, South Carolina In April of 1852 South Carolina declared that the federal government has violated the state s rights under the U.S. Constitution. South Carolina, however, did not secede at this time. 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe s Uncle Tom s Cabin This book was published in response to the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, Uncle Tom s Cabin sold two million copies worldwide within its first two years. After the Bible, Uncle Tom s Cabin was the highest selling book of the 19th century. President Lincoln read Uncle Tom s Cabin before announcing the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862, and when he met Stowe, he exclaimed, So this is the little woman who started this great war!
  11. 11. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre- 1860: Disunion The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 1860186018601860 Presidential Election Abraham Lincoln was elected President. Lincoln was a member of the Republican Party, which wanted to ban slavery in the territories. Many Southerners feared that Lincoln would ban slavery not only in the territories, but also try to abolish it nationwide. 1861 The Civil War Begins On April 12 at 4:30 a.m., the Civil War began when the Confederates fired on Union-held Fort Sumter (South Carolina). Our Southern brethren have done grievously wrong, they have rebelled and have attacked their father s house and their loyal brothers. They must be punished and brought back, but this necessity breaks my heart. Major Robert Anderson, commanding officer at Fort Sumter
  12. 12. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre- 1860: Disunion The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act This act repealed the Missouri Compromise, which stated that states north of latitude 36° 30 would be free states. This allowed settlers in the territories of Kansas and Nebraska to decide whether they would allow slavery within their borders when they applied for statehood. The Kansas-Nebraska Act split the Democratic Party and virtually destroyed the Whig Party. The northern Whigs joined the antislavery Democrats to form the Republican Party. 1857 Dred Scott Decision Dred Scott, a slave, sued for his freedom on the grounds that since his master had taken him to live in free territories, he should be free. The controversial decision of the U.S. Supreme Court stated that no slave or descendant of a slave could be a U.S. citizen. As a non-citizen and a slave viewed as property, Scott was not entitled to file suit. The Court also ruled that Congress had no power to exclude slavery from the territories; therefore, the Missouri Compromise and other legislation limiting slavery were unconstitutional.
  13. 13. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre- 1860: Disunion The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 1850 Compromise of 1850 Disagreements erupted over whether land acquired from Mexico after the Mexican-American War would become slave or free states. The compromise admitted California as a free state, and the inhabitants of the territories of New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, and Utah would be allowed to decide whether or not to permit slavery in their territories when they applied for statehood. The compromise included the Fugitive Slave Act, which denied captured blacks legal power to prove their status as free persons and required U.S. marshals and deputies to help slave owners recapture their property. The compromise also ended the slave trade in the District of Columbia. 1859 John Brown s Raid John Brown, an abolitionist, and his followers seized the U.S. armory and arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia killing civilians and taking hostages in the process. Brown hoped his actions would inspire slaves to rise up. Brown and his followers were quickly killed or captured and later hanged for their actions. While the slaves did not rise up and follow Brown, his raid sparked debate. Northern abolitionists viewed Brown as a martyr, while many Southerners viewed Brown as a murderer.
  14. 14. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre- 1860: Disunion The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Pre- 1861: Disunion In your group, put your event cards in chronological order. Then use the cards to answer the following questions. 1. The Missouri Compromise of 1850 admitted the state of ____________ as a slave state and the state of _____________ as a free state. 2. In 1831 Nat Turner led a slave revolt in Virginia. He was captured and _____________. 3. In the ______________ of 1850, the territories of New Mexico, ______________, ________________, and Utah would be allowed to decide for themselves whether to enter as free or slave states. 4. The South benefitted from the ___________ _________ ______, which required U.S. marshalls to assist in the recapture and return of runaway slaves. 5. A document similar to the Declaration of Independence, the _______________ of Causes for South Carolina, said that states could function as individual countries. 6. Harriet Beecher Stowe s book __________ ________ _____________ sold more than two million copies in two years. Written in response to the Fugitive Slave Law, Lincoln read this book before issuing the Emancipation Proclamation. 7. The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 stated that the states could decide for themselves to enter the Union as a _______ state or a free state. 8. Dred Scott was a slave who sued the United States for his freedom based on his master taking him to a free territory. The Court denied his suit, saying that Scott was not a ______ and considered _______; therefore; he had no right to sue. 9. ___________ ___________ led a raid on the armory and arsenal at Harper s Ferry, Virginia in hopes of causing _________ to rebel. 10. Abraham Lincoln was elected _____________ of the United States in 1860. The Southern states feared he would ____________ slavery in the South. 11. Early in the morning on April 12, 1861, Confederate forces fired on ________ ______________ in South Carolina.
  15. 15. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 1 Pre 1860: Disunion Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Comparing Culture and Economies Essay Compare the culture and economies of the Northern and Southern regions of the United States. Be sure to include: 1. What work people tended to do in the North and South 2. Where people tended to live 3. How people tended to feel about slavery and the federal government ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________
  16. 16. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum GOAL 2 | LESSON PLAN | ELEMENTARY 1861: The Country Goes to War GRADES: Elementary APPROXIMATE LENGTH OF TIME: 55 minutes GOAL: Students will be able to describe the state of the nation and sequence the first events of the Civil War. OBJECTIVES: 1. Students will be able to create a timeline of events from the election of Lincoln to the First Battle of Manassas. 2. Students will be able to complete a map identifying the Southern states, Northern states, and border states. 3. Students will be able to read and summarize portions of Abraham Lincoln s and Jefferson Davis s first inaugural addresses. MATERIALS: 1. The Country Goes to War PowerPoint 2. Timeline Activity Sheet 3. Blank Map of the U.S. in 1860 4. Labeled Map of U.S. in 1860 (for teacher use) 5. Presidential Inaugural Addresses 6. Exit Passes PROCEDURE: Print out the PowerPoint with notes prior to class. There are notes included with the slides that can be on the printed slides, but won t be seen by your students during the presentation. Activity 1 1. Using The Country Goes to War PowerPoint, review events leading up to the bombardment of Fort Sumter.
  17. 17. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 2 1861: The Country Goes to War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 2. Have students complete the Timeline Activity Sheet, filling in events as they appear in the PowerPoint. Activity 2 1. Using the Blank Map of the U.S. in 1860, create an overhead or project the blank map for classroom viewing. 2. Hand out the Blank Map of U.S. in 1860. 3. As a group, color the Union states blue, the Confederate states grey, and the border states green. 4. Draw in or highlight major physical features such as the Mississippi River and the Appalachian Mountain Range. Activity 3 1. Hand out the Presidential Inaugural Addresses to each student. 2. Read through the excerpts as a class. 3. Go over the questions as a group, and have students answer independently or as a group. CLOSURE: 1. On an Exit Pass, have students write how they think citizens felt as the country approached going to war. ASSESSMENT IN THIS LESSON: 1. A completed timeline of the events leading up to the Civil War. 2. The presidential inaugural addresses have been read and summarized and the related questions are answered. 3. An Exit Pass discussing how citizens felt about the approaching war has been completed.
  18. 18. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 2 1861: The Country Goes To War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Timeline Activity Sheet Cut out the pictures and text. Then glue the pictures and text in the correct order on the timeline of events leading up to the Civil War. South Carolina secedes Lincoln elected president of the United States Shots fired at Fort Sumter Shots fired at the Star of the West Jefferson Davis chosen as president of the Confederate States of America The Confederate Constitution is approved
  19. 19. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 2 1861: The Country Goes to War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum
  20. 20. T 1 T E o U I c m G h t i I " The Civil War C 1861: The Coun The Civil War C Excerpt fr of Abraha United Sta In your han countrymen momentous Governmen have no con the aggresso in heaven to I shall have "preserve, p Curriculum, Go ntry Goes To W Curriculum Ele rom the In am Lincoln ates of Am nds, my diss n, and not i s issue of ci nt will not a nflict withou ors. You ha o destroy th the most s protect, and oal 2 War ementary naugural A n, Preside merica satisfied fel n mine, is t vil war. The assail you. Y ut being yo ave no oath he Governm olemn one d defend it." Pre Inaugur Address ent of the llow the e You can urselves registered ment, while to " esidentia ral Addr Exc of J Con I en I ha begi may to o and and to m achi hist idea con righ gove dest esta al esses cerpt from Jefferson nfederate nter upon th ave been ch inning of ou y not be obs our enjoyme d independe d, with the b maintain. O ieved in a m tory of natio a that gover sent of the ht of the peo ernments w tructive of t ablished. Nam Da m the Inau Davis, Pr States of he duties of osen with t ur career as structed by ent of the se ence which blessing of P Our present manner unp ons, illustra rnments res governed, a ople to alter whenever th the ends fo me: _________ ate: _________ Civilwar.org/ ugural Add esident of America f the office t the hope tha s a Confede y hostile opp eparate exi we have as Providence condition, precedented ates the Am st upon the and that it r or abolish hey become r which the _________ _________ curriculum dress f the to which at the eracy position stence sserted, e, intend d in the merican e is the h e ey were
  21. 21. T 1 T The Civil War C 1861: The Coun The Civil War C 1. The are a ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ 2. Wha ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ Curriculum, Go ntry Goes To W Curriculum Ele e war has n aware that ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ at do both ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ oal 2 War ementary not yet star t a war is co ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ men seem ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ rted when b oming? ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ m to want? ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ both of the ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ Peace or W ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ese men sp _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ War? _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ Nam Da peak. Do y ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ me: _________ ate: _________ Civilwar.org/ you think p ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ _________ _________ curriculum people ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______
  22. 22. The Civil W The Civil W 1861: The War Curriculum E War Curriculum, G e Country Goes to W Elementary School Goal 2 War 18660 US Maap Workksheet C Name Date ivilwar.org/curricu e: ______________ e: ______________ ulum ____ ____
  23. 23. The Civil W The Civil W 1861: The War Curriculum E War Curriculum, G e Country Goes to W Elementary School Goal 2 War 1860 Labeledd US Mapp Workshheet C Name Date ivilwar.org/curricu e: ______________ e: ______________ ulum ____ ____
  24. 24. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 2 1861: The Country Goes To War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum How did many citizens feel as the war was about to begin? How did many citizens feelas the war was about to begin? How did many citizens feel as the war was about to begin? How did many citizens feel as the war was about to begin? Exit Pass
  25. 25. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum GOAL 3 | LESSON PLAN | ELEMENTARY 1862: Antietam and Emancipation GRADES: Elementary APPROXIMATE LENGTH OF TIME: 50 minutes GOAL: Students will be able to state the meaning and impact of the Emancipation Proclamation. OBJECTIVES: 1. Students will be able to list the events leading up to the Emancipation Proclamation. 2. Students will be able to discuss the events leading to the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation and General Order 143. 3. After reading the documents, students will be able to discuss the meaning and significance of the Emancipation Proclamation and General Order 143. MATERIALS: 1. Sticky Notes 2. Antietam and Emancipation PowerPoint 3. Battle of Antietam Summary 4. Emancipation Proclamation Excerpt 5. General Order 143 Excerpt 6. Emancipation Proclamation Activity 7. Emancipation Essay VOCABULARY: Emancipation The act of freeing Proclamation a public announcement Contraband a slave from the Confederate states who left their owner to escape to Union lines or a Union state.
  26. 26. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 3 1862: Antietam and Emancipation The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum ANTICIPATORY SET/HOOK: 1. Write on the board or use slide three: What does emancipation mean? 2. As students enter the room, they will take a sticky note and write their answer on it. 3. Have students place the sticky note on the top corner of their desk or work space. This will be revisited at the end of class. PROCEDURE: Print out the Antietam and Emancipation PowerPoint with notes prior to class. There are notes included with the slides that can be on the printed slides, but won t be seen by your students during the presentation. Activity 1 1. Use the Antietam and Emancipation PowerPoint to guide the lesson. a. Hand out the Antietam Summary, Emancipation Proclamation Excerpt, General Order 143 Excerpt, and the Emancipation Activity. b. These pages will be referred to in the PowerPoint. When they are, read and discuss at that time. Activity 2 2. As a class, discuss how the Emancipation Proclamation was important at the time, as well as why it was important to the future of African Americans throughout America. 3. Discuss why it is important today and if it still has meaning today both in the United States and throughout the world. CLOSURE: 1. Hand out the Emancipation Essay, and have students answer the question: Why do you think the Emancipation Proclamation is important today? ASSESSMENT IN THIS LESSON: 1. Informal assessment through discussion questions within PowerPoint. 2. The statements from the Emancipation Proclamation placed in the correct order by students during the Antietam and Emancipation Activity. 3. Students will have written a paragraph describing the importance of the Emancipation Proclamation today on the Emancipation Essay.
  27. 27. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 3 1862: Antietam and Emancipation Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Battle of Antietam Summary LOCATION: Washington County, Maryland DATE(S): September 17, 1862 COMMANDERS: Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan [United States] versus Gen. Robert E. Lee [Confederate States] ESTIMATED CASUALTIES (DIED, INJURED, OR CAPTURED: 22,700 total SUMMARY: In September 1862, Confederate general Robert E. Lee left the South and moved his army into Maryland. No one could be sure exactly what he planned to do, but in an incredible stroke of luck, a copy of Lee s plans (which had been wrapped around three cigars) was discovered by Union soldiers and given to Union general George B. McClellan. Knowing Lee s plan, on September 17, 1862, McClellan s army attacked Lee s army at Antietam Creek in Maryland. The Battle of Antietam (also called the Battle of Sharpsburg) was the bloodiest single day in American history. Lee lost 10,300 men to death, injury, or capture, and McClellan lost 12,400. However, having limited reinforcements and supplies, Lee was forced to retreat, and the North declared the battle a Union victory. Even though the Union won, it did not continue to chase and fight Lee s army. Since Lee and his army got away, the war did not end here; more battles were to come.
  28. 28. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 3 1862: Antietam and Emancipation Name: _________________ Date: _________________ Emancipation Proclamation SEPTEMBER 22, 1862 | ABRAHAM LINCOLN The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum VOCABULARY: 1. Year of our Lord counting years from the birth of Christ another way of saying A.D. or C.E. 2. Designated a specific part 3. Thenceforward from that time on 4. Authority power 5. Repress to keep under control 6. Suitable appropriate or fitting 7. Condition a life situation or state of being 8. Contraband slave who escaped to the Union lines 9. Garrison to man a fort 10. Vessel floating naval transport such as a boat, or ship. 11. Virtue because of 12. Aforesaid already stated EXCERPT: Paragraph Two: "That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. Paragraph Six: And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. Paragraph Eight: And I further declare and make known, that such persons of suitable condition [freed contraband], will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.
  29. 29. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 3 1862: Antietam and Emancipation Name: _________________ Date: _________________ General Order 143 MAY 22, 1863 | WAR DEPARTMENT The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum VOCABULARY: 1. Bureau government department 2. Adjutant general the chief administrative officer of the U.S. Army 3. Consolidated to bring together in a single unified whole 4. Battalions and regiments groups of enlisted soldiers from the same town, county, or state 5. Seriatim in consecutive order; the order in which they were raised 6. Determined decided 7. Designated to mark or name EXCERPT: I -- A Bureau is established in the Adjutant General's Office for the record of all matters relating to the organization of Colored Troops . VI -- Colored troops may be accepted by companies, to be afterward consolidated in battalions and regiments by the Adjutant General. The regiments will be numbered seriatim, in the order in which they are raised, the numbers to be determined by the Adjutant General. They will be designated Regiment of U. S. Colored Troops." (U.S.C.T.) Other Unknown Words: ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________
  30. 30. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 3 1862: Antietam and Emancipation Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Emancipation Proclamation Activity Cut out each of the following statements. Put the statements in the correct order and paste on a sheet of paper. And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. The executive government will enforce the freeing of enslaved individuals. That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; On the first day of January, 1862, all slaves in states in rebellion are free. And I further declare and make known, that such persons of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. Freed slaves will be allowed into the military.
  31. 31. T 1 T W P _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ The Civil War C 1862: Antietam The Civil War C Why do you Proclamatio ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ Curriculum, Go m and Emancip Curriculum Ele u think the E on is impor __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ oal 3 ation ementary Emancipati rtant today? ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ Emanci ion ? __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ ipation E __ __ __ __ __ __ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ Essay __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ Nam Da ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ me: _________ ate: _________ Civilwar.org/ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ __________ _________ _________ curriculum ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________ ________
  32. 32. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum GOAL 4 | LESSON PLAN | ELEMENTARY Life at War GRADES: Elementary APPROXIMATE LENGTH OF TIME: 50 minutes GOAL: The student will describe the day-to-day life of a Civil War soldier OBJECTIVES: 1. Students will be able to describe the use of the equipment, uniforms, weapons, and other items that soldiers would have carried. 2. Students will be able to identify three reasons why battles happened in a certain location. 3. After reading portions of soldiers letters, students will be able to identify and discuss hardships soldiers faced. 4. Students will be able to discuss the role of the African American and immigrant soldier using primary and secondary sources. MATERIALS: 1. Life at War PowerPoint 2. Anticipatory Questions 3. Anticipatory Questions Teacher s Key 4. Life at War Worksheet 5. Where Battles Happen 6. Samuel Cabble s Letter Home 7. John Sweet s Letter Home 8. Analyzing a Primary Source Letter 9. Journey of a Slave Lithograph 10. Exit Ticket ANTICIPATORY SET/HOOK:
  33. 33. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 1. Distribute Anticipatory Questions to each student 2. Have students complete their observations and answer questions with a partner. PROCEDURE Print out the PowerPoint with notes prior to class. There are notes included with the slides that can be on the printed slides, but won t be seen by your students during the presentation. Activity 1 1. Pass out the Life at War Worksheet to each student. 2. Read and discuss the Life at War PowerPoint with your class, discussing different aspects of soldiering. 3. Have students complete the Life at War Worksheet during the presentation. Activity 2 1. Pass out Where Battles Happen and discuss as a class why battles happen in relation to railroads, waterways, and capitals, filling in the boxes. 2. Discuss the second question, Where else might a battle occur? Activity 3 1. As a class, read Samuel Cabble s and John Sweet s letters home. 2. Analyze their letters using the Analyzing a Primary Source Letter. Activity 4 1. Pass out the Journey of a Slave Lithograph and have the students write a new caption under each scene to describe the action occurring in each picture. CLOSURE: 1. Have each student complete the Exit Ticket that discusses hardships faced by Civil War soldiers. ASSESSMENT IN THIS LESSON: 1. Completed the Life at War Worksheet 2. Responses to the Anticipatory Questions 3. Informal assessment through questions during the PowerPoint presentation
  34. 34. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 4. Primary source letter analysis 5. New captions for the Journey of a Slave Lithograph 6. Completed the Exit Ticket in which students list two hardships a Civil War soldier faced
  35. 35. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Anticipatory Questions What does this picture remind you of? ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________
  36. 36. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Describe the way the item looks. ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ What do you think this item was used for? ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________
  37. 37. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Anticipatory Questions, Teacher s Guide What does this picture remind you of? Describe the way the item looks. What do you think this item was used for? Hardtack was a biscuit made of flour, water, and salt. Issued to Union soldiers during the Civil War, hardtack crackers made up a significant portion of a soldier's daily food supply. It was normally square in shape with small holes baked into it, similar to a soda cracker.
  38. 38. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Life at War Worksheet Directions: While viewing the PowerPoint, use the words in the work bank to fill in the blanks. The age of the average Civil War soldier was between _________ and ___________ years of age. One reason why someone might sign up to fight in the Civil War would be: _______________________ Hardtack and salt pork are examples of ___________________ eaten by Civil War soldiers. Civil War soldiers kept in touch with family by writing ___________________. The majority of a soldier s time was spent ____________________ in camp, not fighting on the battlefield. _________________ men died in the Civil War. Word Bank: drilling 620,000 food adventure 16 23 letters sickness available Women memories
  39. 39. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Most men died of ___________________, not war wounds. Hospitals were set up in any ____________ structure, including houses and barns. ______________ came to help nurse the men back to health. Soldiers faced __________________ of the war for the rest of their lives.
  40. 40. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum All of a soldier s personal possessions were carried by the soldier, often in his haversack. Identify and briefly write about five items in the table below: Number Name What it was used for
  41. 41. T L T The Civil War C Life at War The Civil War C Curriculum, Go Curriculum Ele Near Ra Richmo oal 4 ementary W ailroads ond, VA Where Baattles HHappen Nea Was Nam Da ar Waterw shington, me: _________ ate: _________ Civilwar.org/ ways D.C. _________ _________ curriculum
  42. 42. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Why did Civil War battles occur near or around these areas? Railroads & Waterways Capitals Where else might a battle occur? Why?
  43. 43. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Samuel Cabble s Letter Home Samuel Cabble, a Private in the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts Infantry (colored), was a slave before he joined the U.S. Army. He was twenty-one years old. Massachusetts 1863 Dear Wife i have enlisted in the army i am now in the state of Massachusetts but before this letter reaches you i will be in North Carlinia and though great is the present national dificulties yet i look forward to a brighter day When i shall have the opertunity of seeing you in the full enjoyment of fredom i would like to no if you are still in slavery if you are it will not be long before we shall have crushed the system that now opreses you for in the course of three months you shall have your liberty. great is the outpouring of the colered peopl that is now rallying with the hearts of lions against that very curse that has seperated you an me yet we shall meet again and oh what a happy time that will be when this ungodly rebellion shall be put down and the curses of our land is trampled under our feet i am a soldier now and i shall use my utmost endeavor to strike at the rebellion and the heart of this system that so long has kept us in chains . . . remain your own afectionate husband until death Samuel Cabble Samuel Cabble returned to Missouri for his wife, and together they moved to Denver, Colorado.
  44. 44. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum John Sweet s Letter Home Letter from John Sweet, Confederate Soldier, to His Parents Tennessee November 1863 We have just returned from a trip into East Tenn where we got big amounts of everything to eat and everything we eat is so good to me as I had been starved out so long on some bread & beef, all that we got while we were here besieging Chattanooga. up there we got sweet and Irish potatoes, chickens, molassas, wheat bread and everything that was good for a poor soldier. Oh, how I do wish that I could be at home now, for it is getting late in the evening and I have had nothing to eat since breakfast and no telling when we will get rations for our rations are out, since we left our ration wagons behind in coming here to this place, for I know you have all had a good & plentiful dinner. I know you will say poor John, but this is only a chapter in military service which we often read, but I am content and will be more so when we get rations. The independence of the bounty is what I want and I am willing to suffer for something to eat many, many days if it will only send me to my dear parents, a full and independent boy. John H. Sweet
  45. 45. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Analyzing a Primary Source Letter Samuel Cabble - 1. When was Samuel s letter written? ____________________________________________________________ 2. Where was Samuel when he wrote his letter? ____________________________________________________________ 3. Was Samuel a Union soldier, Confederate soldier, or civilian? ____________________________________________________________ 4. What was Samuel s background (that is, was he a native born white, a slave, a freeman, or an immigrant)? ____________________________________________________________ 5. What is Samuel s relationship to the recipient of this letter? ____________________________________________________________ 6. Why do you think Samuel wrote this letter? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 7. What questions do you have about this letter, Samuel, or the people he was writing to? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________
  46. 46. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum John Sweet 1. When was John s letter written? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 2. Where was John when he wrote this letter? ____________________________________________________________ 3. Was John a Union soldier, Confederate soldier, or civilian? ____________________________________________________________ 4. What was John s background (that is, was he a native born white, a slave, a freeman, or an immigrant)? ____________________________________________________________ 5. What is John s relationship to the recipients of this letter? ____________________________________________________________ 6. Why do you think John wrote this letter? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ 7. What questions do you have about this letter, John, or the people he was writing to? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________
  47. 47. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Journey of a Slave Lithograph The following images depict the experience of an African American during the Civil War. Write a brief caption for each image. 1. 2. 3.
  48. 48. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 4. 5. 6. 7.
  49. 49. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 8. 9. 10.
  50. 50. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 11. 12. How do you think African Americans felt about fighting for the United States? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________
  51. 51. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 4 Life at War Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Exit Ticket Name: ____________________________________ Describe two hardships experienced by Civil War soldiers. • • _________________________________________________________________ Exit Ticket Name: _____________________________________ Describe two hardships experienced by Civil War Soldiers. • •
  52. 52. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum GOAL 5 | LESSON PLAN | ELEMENTARY The Home Front GRADES: Elementary APPROXIMATE LENGTH OF TIME: 50 Minutes GOAL: Students will be able to list examples of work done on the home front and describe how news traveled to the home front. OBJECTIVES: 1. Students will be able to discuss the role of women, children, and slaves on the farm and in the home. 2. Students will be able to discuss how women and slaves supported the soldiers at war. 3. Students will be able to identify ways news of the war traveled to the home front, using primary sources such as newspapers, photographs, and letters. MATERIALS: 1. Children s Voices from the Civil War 2. The Civil War Home Front PowerPoint 3. Absolom Harrison Letter I 4. Absolom Harrison Letter II 5. Letty Barnes Letter 6. Rebecca Barrett Letter 7. Sarah S. Sampson Letter 8. Analyzing a Primary Source Letter 9. My Life in the Civil War VOCABULARY: Civilian-a person who is not a soldier or member of the armed forces
  53. 53. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum ANTICIPATORY SET/HOOK: 1. Read excerpts of Children's Voices from the Civil War aloud to the class. 2. Ask students why they think children had these types of experiences. 3. Tell students that today they will determine how the Civil War impacted civilians. PROCEDURE: Print out the PowerPoint with notes prior to class. There are notes included with the slides that can be on the printed slides, but won t be seen by your students during the presentation. Print out and give a copy of The Home Front PowerPoint to each student. Four slides per page leaves room for note taking. Activity 1 1. Present The Home Front PowerPoint presentation, following the discussion questions in the notes section. Activity 2 1. Divide students into 5 groups. 2. Pass out one of the following primary source letters to each group. a. Absolom Harrison Letter I b. Absolom Harrison Letter II c. Letty Barnes Letter d. Rebecca Barrett Letter e. Sarah S. Sampson Letter 3. Pass out a copy of Analyzing a Primary Source Letter to each group 4. Have each group read its primary source letter and analyze it using the Analyzing a Primary Source Letter. CLOSURE: 1. Read some quotes from Children s Voices from the Civil War as a group. 2. Ask students to then write a paragraph discussing their life as a child during the Civil War using My Life in The Civil War. ASSESSMENT IN THIS LESSON: 1. Notes taken during PowerPoint presentation.
  54. 54. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 2. Informal assessment of responses to questions during PowerPoint presentation. 3. Analysis of primary source letters. 4. Completion of My Life in the Civil War.
  55. 55. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Children s Voices from the Civil War I have seen little of the light heartedness and exuberant joy that people talk about as the natural heritage of youth. It is a hard school to be bred up in and I often wonder if I will ever have my share of fun and happiness. Emma Le Conte, age 17 The church yard was strewn with arms and legs that had been amputated and thrown out the windows, and all around were wounded men for whom no place had yet been found. Charles McCurdy, age 10 It wasn t nothing to find a dead man in the woods. James Goings, formerly enslaved, age 6 Cornelia Peake McDonald remembered her three-year-old daughter clinging to her doll, Fanny, and crying that the Yankees are coming to our house and they will capture me and Fanny. A Southern girl My daddy go away to the war bout this time, and my mammy and me stay in our cabin alone. She cry and wonder where he be, if he is well or he be killed, and one day we hear he is dead. My mammy, too, pass in a short time. Amie Lumpkin, former slave, South Carolina I went to the armory of the Hiberian Guards. They seemed to like me, and I liked them. So together with Jim Butler and Jim O Reilly, I enlisted with them. My name was first on the company s roll to enlist. I didn t tell them that I was only fifteen. So I became a soldier. Thomas Galway, Ohio, Union Army We are starving. As soon as enough of us get together we are going to take the bakeries and each of us will take a loaf of bread. This is little enough for the government to give us after it has taken all our men. A young Southern girl, Richmond, Virginia
  56. 56. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum The house was full of the wounded. They had taken our sitting room as an operating room, and our piano served as an amputating table .The surgeons brought my mother a bottle of whiskey and told her that she must take some and so must we all. We did Upstairs they were bringing in the wounded, and we could hear their screams of pain. Sue Chancellor, a Southern girl whose house provided the name for the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia. Early the next morning, the 16 women and children who were hiding in the basement during the battle were brought upstairs. Sue saw the chairs riddled with bullets, the piles of amputated arms and legs, and the rows of dead bodies covered with canvas. The house suddenly caught fire probably from a shell burst and the terrified women and children stumbled out of the building as the pillars collapsed. Her home was completely engulfed in flames, and Sue, her mother, and her five young sisters became homeless refugees. I passed the corpse of a beautiful boy in gray who lay with his blond curls scattered about his face and his hand folded peacefully across his breast. He was clad in a bright and neat uniform, well garnished with gold, which seemed to tell the story of a loving mother and sisters who had sent their household pet to the field of war. His neat little hat lying beside him bore the number of a Georgia regiment He was about my age At the sight of the poor boy s corpse, I burst into a regular boo-hoo and started on. John A Cockerill, Sixteen-year-old regimental musician, Union Army Day after day and night after night did we tramp along the rough and dusty roads, neath the most broiling sun with which the month of August ever afflicted a soldier; thro rivers and their rocky valleys, over mountains scarcely stopping to gather the green corn from the fields to serve as rations During these marches the men are sometimes unrecognizable on account of the thick coverings of dust which settle upon the hair, eye-brows and beard, filling likewise the mouth, nose, eyes, and ears. John Dehaney, Sixteen years old I wanted to fight the Rebs. But I was very small and they would not give me a musket. The next day I went back and the man behind the desk said I looked as if I could hold a drum and if I wanted I could join that way. I did, but I was not happy to change a musket for a stick. Twelve-year-old drummer boy, Union Army
  57. 57. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Fifteen-year-old Tillie Pierce lived in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and was caught up in the three-day battle that raged around the town and nearby farms. Her parents sent her to a farm three miles south of town, thinking Tillie would be safer there. On the way, Tillie and her companions passed soldiers preparing for battle and came under artillery fire. Suddenly we behold an explosion; it is that of a caisson [a carriage carrying ammunition]. We see a man thrown high in the air and come down in a wheat field close by. He is picked up and carried into the house. As they pass by I see his eyes are blown out and his whole person seems to be one black mass... Now the wounded began to come in greater numbers. Some limping, some with their heads and arms in bandages, some crawling, others carried on stretchers or brought in ambulances it was a truly pitiable gathering. Before night the barn was filled with the shattered and dying heroes of this day s struggles . Tillie takes bread and water to the wounded soldiers. After the last day of battle, Tillie walks back to town to rejoin her family. She described what she saw. Horses, swollen to almost twice their natural size, lay in all directions .Fences had disappeared, some buildings were gone, others ruined. The whole landscape had been changed, and I felt as though we were in a strange and blighted land .We reached our homes. Everything seemed to be in confusion, and my home did not look exactly as it did when I left At first glance even my mother did not recognize me, so dilapidated was my general appearance. The only clothes I had along had by this time become covered with mud As soon as I spoke my mother ran to me, and clasping me in her arms, said: Why my dear child, is that you? How glad I am to have you home again without any harm having befallen you! For months afterward, Tillie and her family nursed soldiers in their home and in the field hospitals that sprang up around the town.
  58. 58. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Absolom A. Harrison s Civil War Letter I Camp Morton Near Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky Jan. 19, 1862 Dear Wife, I take my pen in hand to write you a few lines. I am tolerable well at present and I hope these few lines may find you and the children and all the rest of the folks well. I started to write to you the other day but I had only time to write a few lines. I had to expedition and I had been out two days so I concluded to write again. There is a good many of our men sick and there will be a good sick yet for we have been laying on the wet ground ever since we have been here without any straw under us. And the water runs under us every time it rains. There is only about two thirds of the men fit for duty at this time. The boys from Hardin are all well but David ________. He is at the hospital sick with measles. There is some talk of being disbanded but I don't know whether there is any such good luck for us or not. If we are not disbanded I reckon I will stay here until March. Our camp is four miles from Bardstown on the turnpike leading to New Haven. It was very nice in a woods pasture place when we first came here. But it is knee deep in mud now. You must write as soon as you get this if you have not already wrote. I would like to know how mother is and how you and the children are and if folks are getting along. I would like to be at home but I have got myself in this scrape and I will have to stand it. But if I live to get out of this I will never be caught soldiering again that is certain. We did not know what hard times was until we come to this place. We don't get more than half enough to eat and our horses are not half fed and everything goes wrong. I will tell you what we have to do so you will know how much idle time we have. We get up at 6 o'clock and answer roll call. Then we feed and curry our horses and wash which takes up the time till 7 when we eat our breakfast. Then we water our horses. Then drill on foot until dinner. Then at 1- 1/2 o'clock we go out and drill on horseback until four. Then water, feed and curry our horses. Then get wood for the night. By this time it is after dark. So you see they keep us pretty busy. When you write direct your letter to Camp Morton near Bardstown, Nelson Cty., Ky Cal, Boyles Reg., Company D. So nothing more at present but remaining your affectionate husband until death. A. A. Harrison P.S. Tell Martha, Jo is well.
  59. 59. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Absolom A. Harrison's Civil War Letter II Nashville Tenn. April 9th, 1862 Dear Wife, I take my pen in hand to inform you that I am tolerable well at present and hope these few lines may find you are enjoying the same blessing. We have got to this place after a long and tedious march. We got here last Sunday. The country through which we have passed is the worst torn up country I ever saw. The fences are nearly all burnt along the road and lots of the houses deserted and some of these torn all to pieces. We find some Union men down here but they are very scarce in this part of the world. This is a fine country about Nashville. There is some of the finest houses here that I ever saw and plenty of Negroes. We have had two or three insurrections in the regiment. When we fixed to start from Bardstown all the regiment except our company refused to go until they were paid off. But our company took the lead and the rest followed after. Then when we got to Munfordville and got our money they refused to go any further until we got arms and the Colonel went and got some guns that had been refused by several other regiments and told us when we got to Gallatin we should have better arms but we come to this place and this morning the Colonel ordered us to march on to Columbus 45 miles from here and selected our company to take the lead. But they told him plainly they would not go any further without better arms and I have heard that there is no more arms to give out to cavalry. I do not know what will be the result. I have not heard from you since I sent you that money but I hope you have got it. I would like to be at home with you all but I don't know when I can come. There is no chance to get a furlough now. You must write as often as you can and direct your letters to Nashville, Tenn. until I write again. You must be contented as you can and stay where you are until I can get back again and trust to Providence. So nothing more at present but remaining your affectionate husband until death. A. A. Harrison
  60. 60. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Letty Barnes Letter Letter from Letty Barnes to her husband, Joshua, of the Thirty-eighth United States Colored Infantry My dear husband I have just this evening received your letter sent me by Fredrick Finich you can imagine how anxious and worry I had become about you. And so it seems that all can get home once in awhile to see and attend to their family but you I do really think it looks hard your poor old Mother is hear delving and working like a dog to try to keep soul and body together and here am I with two little children and myself to support and not one soul or one dollar to help us I do think if your officers could see us they would certainly let you come home and bring us a little money. She continues in this vein enumerating the various hardships the family is enduring. At the end of her letter she writes lovingly: I have sent you a little keepsake in this letter which you must prize for my sake it is a set of Shirt Bossom Buttons whenever you look at them think of me and know that I am always looking and wishing for you write to me as soon as you receive this let me know how you like them and when you are coming home and beleave me as ever Your devoted wife Letty Barnes Joshua Barnes received his buttons and was granted leave to visit his family.
  61. 61. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Rebecca Barrett Letter Letter written by Rebecca Barrett to her son, William, of the Seventy-fourth United States Colored Infantry My Dear Son It is with pleasure I now embrace the opportunity of penning you a few lines to inform you that I am received your most welcomed letter for I had despaired of your writing. We are both sick pap is prostrated on his bed and has been so for three months and three weeks he got a little better but it did not last long I am very sorry that you have enlisted again for I wanted to see you once more You say you will send me some money do my son for God sake for I am needy at this time the Doctors are so dear that it takes all you can make to pay thier bill I work when I am able but that is so seldom God only knows what I will [do] this winter for I dont. Everything is two prices and one meal cost as much a[s] three used to cost when the rich grumble God help the poor for it is a true saying that (poverty is no disgrace but very unhandy) and I find it very unhandy for if ever a poor soul was poverty stricken I am one and My son if you ever thought of your poor old mother God Grant you may think of her now for this is a needy time. No more but remain Your mother Rebecca Barrat William Barrett did send his mother some money.
  62. 62. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Sarah S. Sampson Letter Nurse, 3rd Maine Volunteer Infantry Agent, Maine State Soldier's Relief Agency Maine Soldiers Relief Association. 973 F Street, Washington, D.C. September 15th, 1863 Gov. Coburn Dear Sir: I am rather late in sending you this list of "soldiers in our hospitals the first of the month" but have done so with as little delay as possible, as it seemed necessary for me to attend to other duties while obtaining the Report. My daily mail has been so heavy since the Battle at Gettysburg that I have not been able to make the copies myself. I spent four weeks with our wounded at Gettysburg and returned to Washington only reluctantly though there were others here who had a claim on my attention. From frequent letters in reference to some of our soldiers who are still unable to be moved from Gettysburg, I am thinking to go on again for a short time, in a few days. The agent from New Hampshire has returned and reports that the boards that mark the graves of our soldiers, are many of them displaced by the heavy rains, etc. and need attention. He had carefully replaced all those from his State. I shall be glad when all the members of our association return so that a meeting may be called to make these & other arrangements. I shall visit all the burial grounds & report while I am there. There is a vacancy at Fairfax Seminary Hospital for Miss Owen of whom you wrote if she desires it. Very Respectfully &c. Mrs. Charles A.L. Sampson
  63. 63. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Analyzing a Primary Source Letter Group Member Names: ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ Directions: 1. Read your group s letter independently and silently. 2. Draw a line down the center of your chart paper to create two columns. 3. In the left column, write the following questions. In the right column, write your answers to these questions. 4. Choose one person to be the main speaker for your group. When we are done your group will present your chart to the class. Questions: What is the name of the person who wrote the letter? Was the author a Union soldier, Confederate soldier, or civilian? (If you cannot tell, explain why you cannot.) How does the person writing the letter know the person the letter was sent to? What events, battles, or other details were discussed in the letter? How does the letter make you feel, and why?
  64. 64. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 5 The Home Front Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum My Life in the Civil War You are a child your age during the American Civil War. Write a paragraph about what your life is like on the lines below. Be sure to include: 1. How old you are 2. Where you live 3. What you have to do around the house, farm, or factory 4. How you feel about the war ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________
  65. 65. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum GOAL 6 | LESSON PLAN | ELEMENTARY 1863: Shifting Tides GRADES: Elementary APPROXIMATE LENGTH OF TIME: 50 minutes GOAL: Students will be able to discuss the effects of the battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg, paying particular attention to the Gettysburg Address. OBJECTIVES: 1. Students will list the sequence of events leading to the battles of Vicksburg and Gettysburg and highlight each event on a map. 2. Students will engage in group discussion about the meaning and significance of the Gettysburg Address. MATERIALS USED: 1. Shifting Tides PowerPoint 2. Shifting Tides Timeline and Map 3. Shifting Tides Timeline Answer Key 4. Two Highlighters of Different Colors 5. Gettysburg Address 6. The Gettysburg Address in Your Own Words PROCEDURE: Print out the PowerPoint with notes prior to class. There are notes included with the slides that can be on the printed slides, but won t be seen by your students during the presentation. Activity 1 1. Use the Shifting Tides PowerPoint to guide the lesson. 2. Hand out the Shifting Tides Timeline and Map, copied back to back.
  66. 66. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 6 1863: Shifting Tides The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 3. Allow students a few minutes to fill in the timeline. 4. As you discuss the events on the PowerPoint, students should highlight each battle on their maps according to whether it was won by the Union or Confederacy. They may create their own key using the boxes located on the Shifting Tides Timeline and Map worksheet. Students should also keep a tally of the winners for each battle. 5. When you arrive at the Gettysburg Address in the PowerPoint, pass out the Gettysburg Address, read it as a group, and discuss its meaning as a class. Activity 2 Partner students and hand out The Gettysburg Address in Your Own Words. Review the discussion questions on the worksheet. Students should use the questions to help them work out the meaning of the Address. CLOSURE: 1. Allow one or two groups of students to share their completed The Gettysburg Address in Your Own Words. ASSESSMENT IN THIS LESSON: 1. Completed Shifting Tides Timeline and Map 2. Completed The Gettysburg Address in Your Own Words 3. A written paragraph about why the Gettysburg Address is still important today. As a homework assignment.
  67. 67. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 6 1863: The Shifting Tides Shifting Tides Timeline & Map Name: _________________ Date: _________________ TIMELINE: Put these events in chronological order along the following timeline. 1861 _______________________________________________________________________________________________ 1863 DATE BATTLE NAME WINNER Sept 17, 1862 Antietam, a.k.a. Sharpsburg, MD USA April 12-13, 1861 Attack on Fort Sumter, SC CSA April 30-May 6, 1863 Chancellorsville, VA CSA Feb 6-16 ,1862 Fort Henry/Fort Donelson, TN USA Dec 13, 1862 Fredericksburg, VA CSA July 1-3, 1863 Gettysburg, PA USA March-June, 1862 Jackson s Valley Campaign, VA CSA July 21, 1861 First Manassas, a.k.a. Bull Run, VA CSA August 28-30, 1862 Second Manassas, a.k.a. Second Bull Run, VA USA Oct 8, 1862 Perryville, KY USA April 6-7, 1862 Shiloh, a.k.a. Pittsburg Landing, TN USA May 18 July 4, 1863 Siege of Vicksburg, MS USA Dec 31, 1862-Jan 2, 1863 Stones River, a.k.a. Murfreesboro, TN USA TALLY THE BATTLE VICTORIES: Union Confederate_ MAP KEY: Highlight the squares with the colors you use. U.S.A. Victory C.S.A Victory
  68. 68. The Civil WWar Curriculum EElementary Civilwar.org/curricuulum
  69. 69. Goal6|Elementary|1863:Shifting Tides civilwar.org/education Name __________________________________________________________________ Date_________________ Put these events in chronological order along the timeline given below. 1861 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___1863 Date Battle Name Winner Sept 17, 1862 Antietam a.k.a. Sharpsburg, MD USA April 12-13, 1861 Attack on Fort Sumter, SC CSA April 30-May 6, 1863 Chancellorsville, VA CSA Feb 6-16 ,1862 Fort Henry/Fort Donelson, TN USA Dec 13, 1862 Fredericksburg, VA CSA July 1-3, 1863 Gettysburg, PA USA March-June, 1862 Jackson s Valley Campaign, VA CSA July 21, 1861 1st Manassas a.k.a. Bull Run, VA CSA August 28-30, 1862 2nd Manassas a.k.a. 2nd Bull Run, VA USA Oct 8, 1862 Perryville, KY USA April 6-7, 1862 Shiloh a.k.a. Pittsburg Landing, TN USA May 18 July 4 1863 Siege of Vicksburg, MS USA Dec 31, 1862-Jan 2, 1863 Stones River a.k.a. Murfreesboro, TN USA Tally the battle victories:Tally the battle victories:Tally the battle victories:Tally the battle victories: Union VictoryConfederateVictory IIIII IIIII III Map Key: Highlightthesquares withthe colorsyou willbeusing. U.S.A. Victory C.S.A Victory
  70. 70. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 6 1863: The Shifting Tides Name: _________________ Date: _________________ Gettysburg Address NOVEMBER 19, 1863 | ABRAHAM LINCOLN The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum VOCABULARY 1. Score-a group or set of 20 2. Conceive-to form a notion or idea 3. Dedicate-to devote to a purpose or person 4. Proposition-an offer or suggestion that something be considered 5. Engage-to occupy the attention or efforts of 6. Portion-a part 7. Consecrate-to make or declare sacred 8. Hallow-to make holy; to honor as holy; to consider sacred 9. Detract-to take or draw away from.; to divert or distract 10. Devotion-attachment to a cause or person 11. Resolve-to come to a definitive decision 12. Vain-without real significance 13. Perish-to die or be destroyed Abraham Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address during the dedication of the cemetery for Union soldiers who fought and died in the Battle of Gettysburg. In the address, Lincoln expressed the great need for Americans to remember the sacrifice made by these soldiers. Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation under God shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.
  71. 71. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 6 1863: The Shifting Tides Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum The Gettysburg Address in Your Own Words Re-read the Address with a partner. Write the Address in your own words on the lines below. Ask yourself the following questions to help guide your discussion: 1. What do you think Abraham Lincoln was trying to accomplish with the Gettysburg Address? 2. Who was he talking to? 3. Who were these dead that he is talking about? 4. What did the American people have to do to make sure that the U.S. soldiers killed in the War had not died in vain ? 5. What do you think Lincoln meant by the phrase government of the people, by the people, for the people ? _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________
  72. 72. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 6 1863: The Shifting Tides The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________
  73. 73. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum GOAL 7 | LESSON PLAN | ELEMENTARY 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End GRADES: Elementary APPROXIMATE LENGTH OF TIME: 50 minutes GOAL: Students will be able to list the sequence of events leading to the end of the Civil War, paying special attention to the election of 1864. OBJECTIVES: 1. Students will list the sequence of events leading to the end of the war and place each event on a map. 2. Students will engage in group and class debates over the issues of the 1864 election and write a paragraph explaining both Lincoln s and McClellan s views on the war prior to the election of 1864. 3. After reading a portion of The Last Salute of the Army of Northern Virginia, students will discuss U.S. soldier s feelings toward Confederate soldiers. MATERIALS: 1. Bringing the War to an End PowerPoint 2. Timeline and Map Worksheet 3. Lincoln & McClellan Cards 4. The Chicago Platform 5. The Baltimore Platform 6. What Do You Think? 7. The Last Salute of the Army of Northern Virginia ANTICIPATORY SET/HOOK: By 1864 the situation is looking up for the United States, with victories at Vicksburg and Gettysburg; however, some people are tired of war and are looking for a way to end it soon.
  74. 74. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 Bringing the War to an End The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Lincoln will soon complete one four-year term as president. How do you think the election is going to go? Do you think Lincoln will be reelected or will someone else become president? While Lincoln believes that it is important to keep fighting to bring the Southern states back into the Union, what do you think his opponent believes? PROCEDURE: Print out the PowerPoint with notes prior to class. There are notes included with the slides that can be on the printed slides, but won t be seen by your students during the presentation. Activity 1 1. Throughout the lesson, follow the Bringing the War to an End PowerPoint. 2. Hand out Timeline and Map Worksheet, copied back to back. 3. Have students fill in the Timeline. 4. As you go through the events in the PowerPoint, have students place the events on the map and write in the dates. Activity 2 5. Hand out the Lincoln & McClellan Cards to students; there should be roughly the same number of Lincolns and McClellans. 6. Hand out the Baltimore Platform to all of the Lincolns and the Chicago Platform to all of the McClellans. 7. Begin the Bringing the War to an End PowerPoint presentation. 8. Read the bolded information of each platform together as a class. 9. Put all of the Lincolns in one group and all of the McClellan in another. 10. Hand out the What Do You Think? Worksheet, and have students work together to gather their ideas for a debate, filling out the note sheet as they go. CLOSURE: As a class, read the excerpt from U.S. brigadier general Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain s Last Salute of the Army of Northern Virginia and discuss. ASSESSMENT IN THIS LESSON: 1. Completed timeline 2. Completed map
  75. 75. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 Bringing the War to an End The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum 3. Informal evaluation during the Lincoln/McClellan debate. 4. Notes on the What Do You Think? worksheet. 5. Informal evaluation through the discussion questions on the Last Salute of the Army of Northern Virginia.
  76. 76. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End Timeline and Map Worksheet Name: _________________ Date: _________________ Put these events in chronological order along the following timeline. 1864 1865 Date Battle Name Location May-Sept, 1864 Atlanta Campaign From Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Atlanta, Georgia April 26, 1865 Joseph Johnston s army surrenders Durham, North Carolina April 9, 1865 Lee s army surrenders Appomattox, Virginia April 14, 1865 Lincoln is assassinated Washington, DC Sept-Dec 1864 March to the Sea From Atlanta, Georgia, to Savannah, Georgia May-June 1864 Overland Virginia Campaign Wilderness, Virginia, to Petersburg, Virginia Nov. 1864 Reelection of Lincoln Washington, DC July 1864-April 1865 Siege of Petersburg Petersburg, Virginia
  77. 77. The Civil WWar Curriculum EElementary Civilwar.org/curricuulum
  78. 78. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum Lincoln & McClellan Cards Cut out the cards and hand one to each student as they enter the room. Each Lincoln will pair with a McClellan for the partner activity. Lincoln Lincoln Lincoln McClellan McClellan McClellan Lincoln Lincoln Lincoln McClellan McClellan McClellan Lincoln Lincoln Lincoln McClellan McClellan McClellan Lincoln Lincoln Lincoln McClellan McClellan McClellan Lincoln Lincoln Lincoln McClellan McClellan McClellan
  79. 79. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum The Chicago Platform Created/Published: 1864 The Democratic National Convention which gathered at Chicago on the 29th of August, and presented the names of GEORGE B. McCLELLAN for President, and GEORGE H. PENDLETON for Vice-President, agreed on and adopted the following platform. Resolved, That in the future, as in the past, we will adhere with unswerving fidelity to the Union under the Constitution, as the only solid foundation of our strength, security, and happiness as a people, and as a frame-work of government equally conducive to the welfare and prosperity of all the States, both Northern, and Southern. Resolved, That this Convention does explicitly declare, as 'the sense of the American People, that, after four years of failure to restore the Union by the experiment of war, during which, under the pretense of a military necessity of a war power higher than the Constitution, the Constitution itself has been disregarded in every part, and public liberty and private right alike trodden down, and the material prosperity of the country essentially impaired, justice, humanity, liberty, and the public welfare, demand that immediate efforts be made for a cessation of hostilities, with a view to an ultimate Convention of all the States, or other peaceable means to the end that at the earliest practicable moment peace may be restored on the basis of the Federal Union of the States. Resolved, That the direct interference of the military authority of the United States in the recent elections held in Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri and Delaware; was a shameful violation of the Constitution, and the repetition of such acts in the approaching election will be held as revolutionary, and resisted with all the means and power under our control. Resolved, That the aim and object of the Democratic party is to preserve the federal Union and the rights of the States unimpaired; and they hereby declare that they consider the Administrative usurpation of extraordinary and dangerous powers not granted by the Constitution, the subversion of the civil by military law in States not in insurrection, the arbitrary military arrest, imprisonment, trial and sentence of American citizens in States where civil law exists in full force, the suppression of freedom of speech and of the press, the denial of the right of asylum, the open and avowed disregard of State rights, the employment of unusual test-oaths, and the interference with and denial of the right of the people to bear arms, as calculated to prevent a restoration of the Union and the perpetuation of a government deriving its just powers from the consent of the governed. Resolved, that the shameful disregard of the Administration to its duty in respect to our fellow citizens who now and long have been prisoners of war in a suffering condition, deserves the severest reprobation, on the score alike of public interest and common humanity. Resolved, That the sympathy of the Democratic party is heartily and earnestly extended to the soldiery of our army, who are and have been in the field under, the flag of
  80. 80. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum our country; and, in the event of our attaining power, they will receive all the care and protection, regard and kindness, that the brave soldiers of the Republic have so nobly earned.
  81. 81. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum The Baltimore Platform The National Convention which assembled at Baltimore on the 7th of last June and there nominated ABRAHAM LINCOLN for re-election as President, with ANDREW JOHNSON as Vice-President, adopted and presented to the American People the following platform. Resolved, That it is the highest duty of every American citizen to maintain against all their enemies the integrity of the Union, and the paramount authority of the Constitution and laws of the United States; and that, laying aside all differences of political opinion, we pledge ourselves as Union men, animated by a common sentiment, and aiming at a common object, to do everything in our power to aid the Government in quelling by force of arms the rebellion now raging against its authority, and in bringing to the punishment due to their crimes the rebels and traitors arrayed against it. Resolved, That we approve the determination of the Government of the United States not to compromise with rebels, nor to offer any terms of peace except such as may be based upon an "unconditional surrender " of their hostility and a return to their just allegiance to the Constitution and laws of the United States, and that we call upon the Government to maintain this position and to prosecute the war with the utmost possible vigor to the complete, suppression of the Rebellion, in full reliance upon, the self-sacrifice, the patriotism, the heroic valor, and the undying devotion of the American people to their country and its free institutions. Resolved, That, as Slavery was the cause, and now constitutes the strength, of this rebellion, and as it must be always and everywhere hostile to the principles of republican government, justice and the national safety demand its utter and complete extirpation from the soil of the republic; and that we uphold and maintain the acts and proclamations by which the Government, in its own defense, has aimed a death-blow at this gigantic evil. - We are in favor, furthermore, of such an amendment to the Constitution, to be made by the people in conformity with its provisions, as shall terminate and forever prohibit the existence of Slavery within the limits of the jurisdiction of the United States. Resolved, That the thanks of the American People are due to the soldiers and sailors of the Army and Navy, who have periled their lives in defense of their country, and in vindication of the honor of the flag; that the nation owes to them sonic permanent recognition of their patriotism and valor, and ample and permanent provision for those of their survivors who have received disabling and honorable wounds in the service of the country; and that the memories of those who have fallen in its defense shall be held in grateful and everlasting remembrance. Resolved, That we approve and applaud the practical wisdom, the unselfish patriotism, and unswerving fidelity to the Constitution and the principles of American liberty, with which Abraham Lincoln has discharged, under circumstances
  82. 82. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum of unparalleled difficulty, the great duties and responsibilities of the presidential office; that we approve and indorse, as demanded by the emergency and essential to the preservation of the nation, and as within the Constitution, the measures and acts which he has adopted to defend the nation against its open and secret foes; that we approve especially the Proclamation of Emancipation, and the employment as Union soldiers of men heretofore held in Slavery; and that we have full confidence in his determination to carry these and all other constitutional measures essential to the salvation of the country into full and complete effect. Resolved, That we deem it essential to the general welfare that harmony should prevail in the National councils, and we regard as worthy of public confidence and official trust those only who cordially indorse the principles proclaimed in these resolutions, and which should characterize the administration of the Government. Resolved, That the Government owes to all men employed in its armies, without regard to distinction of color, the full protection of the laws of war; and that any violation of these laws or of the usages of civilized nations in the time of war by the Rebels now in arms, should be made the subject of full and prompt redress. Resolved, That the foreign migration, which in the past has added so much to the wealth and development of resources and increase of power to this nation, the asylum of the oppressed of all nations, should be fostered and encouraged by a liberal and just policy. Resolved, That we are in favor of the speedy construction of a Railroad to the Pacific. Resolved, That the National faith, pledged for the redemption of the Public Debt, must be kept inviolate; and that for this purpose we recommend economy and rigid responsibility in the public expenditures, and a vigorous and just system of taxation; that it is the duty of every loyal State to sustain the credit and promote the use of the National Currency. Resolved, That we approve the position taken by the Government that the people of the United States never regarded with indifference the attempt of any European power to overthrow by force, or to supplant by fraud, the institutions of any republican government on the western continent, and that they view with extreme jealousy, as menacing to the peace and independence of this our country, the efforts of any such power to obtain new footholds for monarchical governments, sustained by a foreign military force, in near proximity to the United States.
  83. 83. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum What Do You Think? With your partner, debate whether the United States should continue fighting the Confederacy in an effort to save the Union. Complete the note sheet as you address each question. Depending on the name you received at the beginning of class, you will either consider the question from the perspective of Abraham Lincoln or George B. McClellan, making sure to think about the military, political, and economic factors involved in your decision. If you choose to continue fighting the war How will you win? Will you continue to try and spare non-combatants as the war wages around them? Will you punish all of the people of the Confederacy or just those who took up arms against the United States? How will you persuade the Northern public to support the effort? How will you persuade Congress to financially support the war effort? If you choose NOT to continue fighting the war How will you defend your new southern border? How will you address the issue of runaway slaves from the South? Will you enact a law similar to the Fugitive Slave Act to appease the new southern Confederacy?
  84. 84. The Civil War Curriculum, Goal 7 1864-1865: Bringing the War to an End Name: _________________ Date: _________________ The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum The Last Salute of the Army of Northern Virginia Excerpt: "Bayonets were affixed to muskets, arms stacked, and cartridge boxes unslung and hung upon the stacks. Then, slowly and with a reluctance that was appealingly pathetic, the torn and tattered battleflags were either leaned against the stacks or laid upon the ground. The emotion of the conquered soldiery was really sad to witness. Some of the men who had carried and followed those ragged standards through the four long years of strife, rushed, regardless of all discipline, from the ranks, bent about their old flags, and pressed them to their lips with burning tears. "And it can well be imagined, too, that there was no lack of emotion on our side, but the Union men were held steady in their lines, without the least show of demonstration by word or by motion. There was, though, a twitching of the muscles of their faces, and, be it said, their battle-bronzed cheeks were not altogether dry. Our men felt the import of the occasion, and realized fully how they would have been affected if defeat and surrender had been their lot after such a fearful struggle. "But, as I was saying, every token of armed hostility having been laid aside, and the men having given their words of honor that they would never serve again against the flag, they were free to go whither they would and as best they could. In the meantime our army had been supplying them with rations. On the next morning, however, the morning of the 13th, we could see the men, singly or in squads, making their way slowly into the distance, in whichever direction was nearest home, and by nightfall we were left there at Appomattox Courthouse lonesome and alone." -Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain Discussion Questions: Does this scene seem to be full of hatred or kindness? How do the Union soldiers feel as they watch the Confederate soldiers put down their weapons and walk away?
  85. 85. The Civil War Curriculum | Elementary Civilwar.org/curriculum GOAL 8 | LESSON PLAN | ELEMENTARY Post-1865: Effects of the War GRADES: Elementary APPROXIMATE LENGTH OF TIME: 50 minutes GOAL: Students will be able to state the effects of the Civil War. OBJECTIVES: 1. Students will be able to discuss Lincoln s ideas on reunification and define Reconstruction. 2. Students will be able to discuss John Wilkes Booth s reasons for assassinating President Lincoln. 3. Students will be able to list the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments. 4. Students will be able to discuss the positive and negative outcomes of the Civil War. MATERIALS USED: 1. Grant from West Point to Appomattox 2. What Did Lincoln Want? 3. Booth s Original Plan & Questions 4. Amendments Note Sheet 5. Reconstruction Amendment Timeline 6. Positive and Negative Outcomes 7. The Effects of War Essay ANTICIPATORY SET/HOOK: 1. Put the engraving, Grant from West Point to Appomattox, either on your Smart Board or a transparency. 2. Have students review their knowledge of the Civil War by discussing the events from Grant s life pictured in the work.

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